Global Information Terminals Sales Market 2017 – Diebold, IBM, KIOSK Information Systems, Slabb, Meridian Kiosks, Olea

To analyze the growth trajectory and present an industry overview of the global Information Terminals Sales market, the report titled Information Terminals Sales begins with definition, application, classification, industry chain analysis, news analysis and policy analysis of the market.

Source: techannouncer.com

another offshore report




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Photo Kiosk Feature – Is there a future in photo?

sony photo kiosk
click for full size

While the drugstore photo kiosk may be a mature sector, new developments in imaging technology promise to open the door to new opportunities.

By Richard Slawsky contributor

It seems like it was just yesterday that nearly every grocery store and strip mall featured a drive-up Fotomat film processing shop in the parking lot. Amateur photographers would drive up to the window, drop off their film or disposable camera, and stop back a few days later to pick up their pack of prints.

With the advent of digital photography, though, those shops quickly disappeared, with photo processing services moving inside the store to serve as a customer draw. In 1980 there were more than 4,000 Fotomat stores around the United States; today not a single one remains. Digital cameras began outselling film cameras in 2003, and the trend has continued ever since. Kodak stopped selling film cameras in 2004, and Nikon followed suite in 2006. What was probably the final nail in the film coffin came in 2012, when Kodak declared bankruptcy.

The move to digital did, though, open up opportunities for photo development kiosks as the customer touchpoint for photo processing services. The premise was that shoppers would bring in their camera’s memory card, insert it into the kiosk and select the number and size of the photos they’d like printed. And of course, do a bit of shopping while they waited for their photos to be ready.

While the veracity of the numbers is debatable, one of the many research reports that predict trends in the kiosk industry forecasts the size of the global photo kiosk market in 2017 will total $1.5 billion. Another one forecasts the market will total $1.9 billion by 2020, so apparently some amount of growth is likely.

kiosk market research
Click for full size

Does that mean kiosk manufacturers should consider adding photo kiosks to their portfolio? While that depends on the strengths and expertise of a particular company, the short answer is probably not. The capital investment required to make a go of photo kiosks is so large that it’s likely beyond the capabilities of all but the most established companies, and the multitude of changes occurring in the imaging industry means the direction of the market isn’t yet clear.

Following the trail

To get a sense of where the photo industry is going and what the opportunities for kiosk deployers might be, it helps to have a sense of where it’s been.

From the early 1960s, when Kodak first introduced its inexpensive Instamatic camera, on through the 1990s, most households likely owned a single camera or bought disposable cameras one at a time, processing two or three rolls of film a year. It wasn’t unusual to find a disposable camera with four or five shots left on it in the bottom of a drawer, snap off those photos and drop them off for processing with little or no recollection of what was on the earlier shots.

“The photo finishers used to joke they’d get a roll of film and there was a Christmas tree on each end,” said Gary Pageau, who formerly as an executive and communication consultant with the now-defunct industry trade group the Photo Marketing Association. At its peak, the annual PMA trade in Las Vegas boasted more than 50,000 attendees, but industry changes prompted a scheduling change in 2012 to coincide with the Consumer Electronics Show. In 2016, the PMA merged with the Photo Imaging Manufacturers and Distributors organization to form the Imaging Alliance.

“People in those days used to take pictures more for memories,” Pageau said. “And very few pictures were enlarged.”

Cameras were first paired with mobile phones in 2000, and today nearly everyone has a mobile phone camera in their pocket. In most cases, those cameras pack a resolution greater than the best film cameras.

And that has led to a staggering increase in the number of photos taken each year. Technology website TechCrunch estimates there will be 1.2 trillion photos taken around the world in 2017, nearly 14 times the 86 billion photos the news site Buzzfeed estimates were taken in 2000.

Although that would seem like a jackpot for the photo processing industry, it hasn’t quite worked out that way. Most photos aren’t ever printed, and photo paper is only one of several choices of media on which to print images.

“Metal prints are big right now, canvas prints are big and paper prints in weird sizes like square prints,” Pageau said.

“Printing on clothing, printing on fleece, throws and blankets and things like that are popular,” he said. “Now, when they do print pictures, people usually have a specific purpose in mind.”

Another change affecting the photography world is the advent of smartphones and wireless connectivity in the mid-to-late 2000s. Although there was a brief period where an in-store kiosk was the method of choice for choosing images to be printed, that has been supplanted by websites and apps. If a store does offer a photo kiosk, customers expect to be able to wirelessly transfer images from phone to kiosk.

And many customers are no longer expecting to have their prints ready in an hour or less.

“Although instant printing used to be a big thing, many people today really don’t expect to get their output right away,” Pageau said. “They understand that if you’re making a print on metal or canvas that it’s going to take a while; it may have to be shipped out or whatever.”

So while 10 years ago it may have been cost effective for a retailer to invest $250,000 or more in an in-store photo lab, today that may not be as worthwhile. While in the early days of digital photography that photo lab might have guaranteed two customer visits – one to drop off and one to pick up – today those customers may not even set foot in a store to have their images printed.

So where are things headed?

Obviously, the photo kiosk market faces stiff competition. Although there are still plenty of kiosks in the marketplace, anyone thinking about entering the market is likely to face some challenges.

“A new photo kiosk is a beautiful thing, but sadly the market is full of old photo kiosks,” said Murray Macdonald, president and chief technology officer at Vancouver-based Storefront.com, which specializes in creating customer-facing applications, imaging infrastructure and management systems for SMEs, global multinationals and Fortune 500 clients.

Storefront Neo photo kiosk. click for full size

“Retailers today don’t have the capex to change that,” Macdonald said. “They’re just kind of maintaining what they have.”

Consolidation in the retail and pharmacy sectors has left many companies with collections of disparate kiosk solutions, making it difficult to introduce new equipment and having it play well with legacy systems. And of course, kiosks have become just one of several channels by which customers get their images to the lab.

“Retailers today need a Web solution and a mobile app along with a kiosk,” Macdonald said. “So retailers really need three customer-facing interfaces and then the backend stuff. A kiosk is really just one of those three today. You’ve got to kind of stitch all that together as a retailer or buy it from a provider who can give you all those pieces.”

In addition, online photo processing sites such as Shutterfly and Snapfish, where customers upload their photos to a website and have the printed images shipped to their homes, are gaining in popularity and market share. Shutterfly, for example, serviced 10.1 million customers in 2016, a 4 percent increase over the previous year.

Still, that doesn’t mean that kiosks as part of a photo solution are a dying breed.

“We’ve been surprised by how strong the kiosks are, actually,” Macdonald said. “We’ve actually seen growth on ins store purchasing for certain types of products and depending on the retailer. “

A host of new technological developments promise to crack open new opportunities for both the kiosk industry and the imaging industry as well.

“I’m very excited right now about both industries,” Macdonald said.

“There is a lot of stuff happening right now,” he said. “Things like 3D printing and depth cameras are going to bring on a whole new rash of applications.”

Depth cameras, or range imaging time-of-flight cameras, can sense the time that it takes light to return from objects in a photograph. The camera takes that information and combines it with video data to create 3D images, enabling it to calculate the measurements of a room or remove or overlay 3D objects or backgrounds from an image.

“I think there’s a market for novelty kiosks and mobile applications that do fun stuff with people and their photos,” Macdonald said. “That will all be based on new types of cameras and some of the other new products coming on the market.”

Other new technologies promising to bring change to the industries include some that Macdonald’s company is developing, including artificial intelligence that can expand the size of an image while actually improving resolution. Potential applications include taking a 4” by 6” image and blowing it up for a large wall canvas.

“We can take your image and not just scale it up, but actually synthesize the detail that’s missing at that resolution,” Macdonald said. “The results are spectacular.”

 




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Vending kiosk machine Vicki could compete with Amazon Go

vending kioskApple has Siri. Amazon has Alexa. This summer Tom Murn will have Vicki, a vending machine endowed with artificial intelligence that will be popping up in college cafeterias, drugstores, hospital waiting rooms and offices around town, and could change the way New Yorkers shop. Shaped like an iPhone but as big as a refrigerator, the device will neither take coins or cash nor drop a bag of potato chips into a slot. Users will instead open its glass door by way of an iris scan, a fingerprint impression or a phone or a credit card swipe and take a product off a shelf. The price will immediately appear on a screen above the door—and disappear if the product is put back down.

An ad for the item also might play on the screen. If shoppers have questions, Vicki will provide answers—as they try on sunglasses, wonder if a cookie is gluten-free or consider buying a high-tech toy they don’t know how to work. Vicki will even make hard-to-refuse offers, like suggesting a bottle of water—at half price—to go with a sandwich. Shutting the door completes the sale, with the customer being charged for the item(s).

“This is so much more than a vending machine,” said Murn, 51. “You can pick up [a product] and put it back. [The machine] can pull information from Facebook and say, ‘Happy birthday.’ It can do rewards. You can’t do any of that with a vending machine.”

Rest of article




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POP Design – ilumi® LED Smartbulbs, enlightens the IoT market at retail.

IoT MarketFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New product, ilumi® LED Smartbulbs, enlightens the IoT market at retail.

Grafton, WI, April 7, 2017 – ilumi® solutions, one of the fastest growing Internet of Things (IoT) companies, is introducing their LED Smartbulb technology with counter displays in electronics stores in both the U.S and Canada.

Within the rapidly expanding smart home product category at retail, this new brand showcases their newest smartbulb product while highlighting itself as a Shark Tank-funded company. The retail displays demonstrate their Bluetooth app controlled smart light bulbs within a concise counter-top footprint. Within the plex shroud the bulb transitions through different lighting hues and brightness effects as if controlled via the ilumi
smartphone app.

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. (www.frankmayer.com) is an industry leader in the creative design and manufacturing of branded in-store merchandising displays, interactive kiosks and store fixtures for leading consumer product companies and retailers. Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.’s headquarters are based in Grafton, Wisconsin with offices nationwide.

Contact:
Cheryl Lesniak
Integrated Marketing Manager
Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.
P: 262-377-4700
Cheryl.lesniak@frankmayer.com
www.frankmayer.com

###



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White Paper – Payment Processor for Kiosks

payment gateway
EMV Kiosk

The Value of Payment Gateways for Kiosks

When a merchant wants to accept payments through their unattended kiosk, they are faced with many processing choices and industry complexities.  Whether forming multiple direct integrations to processors or utilizing one-to-many processing solutions provided by middleware or gateways, kiosk operators and merchants have a lot to consider.

A payment integration to a gateway or processor can require a great deal of time and resources.  Kiosk operators also need to assess ongoing remote maintenance and how to support multiple integrations.  In addition, there are various industry, regulatory and compliance requirements (like EMV and PCI DSS) to follow, as well as value-added security features such as end-to-end encryption or tokenization for recurring payments to consider.  The payment process and user interface must attract and retain the customer through the entire payment process.  As most kiosk users are untrained, transaction abandonment is common with a slow or cumbersome user interface.

This whitepaper will evaluate the benefits and costs of integrating payments via a gateway versus via direct processor connections, plus explore the other potential value points a gateway partner can provide kiosk operators and merchants.

Gateways and Payment Processors Defined

With the payment landscape growing more complex every year, merchants are seeking more sophisticated technologies to help them accept diverse forms of payment and integrate payment data with their other systems, such as inventory management, accounting and more.  Kiosk operators need systems designed for ease of use, speed and security, and payment gateways and payment processors are two of the most widely used solutions for payment acceptance.

A gateway is essentially a secure cloud-based platform that connects credit card payments from merchant points of sale (POS) to their processors, thereby facilitating the authorization and settlement of payment transactions.  Why have a gateway in the middle of this important relationship?  The short answer is for security and flexibility, but the details and other benefits will be expanded below.

A payment processor is a company (often a third party) appointed by a merchant to handle transactions from various channels, such as credit cards and debit cards for merchant acquiring banks.  They are usually two types: front-end and back-end processors.  Front-end processors have connections to various card associations and supply authorization and settlement services to merchants.  Back-end processors accept settlements from front-end processors and move money from issuing bank to the merchant bank.

Pros and Cons of Leveraging a Gateway

Gateways provide several benefits to kiosk operators that are integrating payments into their offerings:

  • A single connection to a gateway leverages that gateway’s multiple connections to many processors, enabling kiosk operators to have more freedom to choose their processor partners and accommodate a broader customer base with very different payment needs.  Connecting once to access multiple payment processors is much more cost-effective and efficient than creating multiple direct processor connections.
  • Access to the gateway provider’s reseller base, which gives kiosk operators connections to potential channel partners and greatly increases growth opportunities.
  • PCI DSS compliance of each processor connection, securely routing card data from the POS system to the processor of choice—again all delivered via the single connection to the gateway.
  • Access to PCI scope-reduction tools, like end-to-end encryption, EMV and tokenization, which limit the kiosk operator’s exposure to handling sensitive card data and potential fraud.
  • Lower upkeep and maintenance costs due to the fact that the gateway provider handles the bi-annual card brand releases and enhancements required by card brands and processors.

The price of leveraging these gateway benefits is typically a gateway transaction fee—an expense in addition to the interchange fees charged by processors.  While the gateway fee is typically nominal, the expense can add up over time as transaction volumes grow.

Pros and Cons of Direct Connections

The main benefit of direct connections is that they eliminate incremental transaction fees typically associated with gateways, because direct processor connections cut out the “middle man” with a select processor.

However, there are additional costs in both funds and time accompanying direct processor connections:

  • Merchant have fewer choices for payment processors—typically only the one processor is directly connected.
  • Kiosk operators are personally responsible for PCI compliance, which is an ongoing and labor-intensive process.  Even when using a PCI DSS-compliant level one service provider, the kiosk operator will still need to adhere to any applicable PSI DSS obligations set forth by their acquirer, based on processing environment, volume of transactions and policies/procedures.
  • It takes a substantial amount of work (and, therefore, cost) to certify and maintain each individual connection, comply with PCI data security standards, and perform necessary updates for card brand and processor bi-annual releases.  This can result in a very expensive, time-consuming and resource-intensive effort for kiosk operators who wish to handle payments processing development themselves.

Integrating with direct connections and certifying EMV transactions for every chosen processor requires several steps, each of which can each take weeks or months to complete:

  1. Submitting and getting approval from the payment processors for an EMV Application Request
  2. Assigning a Certification Analyst and acquiring Magnetic Stripe Reader (MSR) Certification
  3. Completing pre-certification EMV Testing
  4. Completing subsequent EMV certification with individual card brands (These certifications are device- and processor-specific, and separate for Visa, MasterCard, Discover and AMEX)

Repeating this process for each connection is extremely costly to initiate and maintain.  Kiosk operators must certify each desired hardware to each desired processor, and any alterations to the payment application requires a new EMV certificate.

EMV for Kiosk Operators

With the implementation of EMV cards in the U.S., kiosk merchants are seeing improved security for consumers and decreased fraud for merchants.  With these benefits, come a few challenges, the first of which is that kiosks are usually unattended devices.  Since the kiosks are not using a basic POS terminal, an original equipment manufacturer approved for unattended use is needed for Level 1 EMV compliance.  Level 1 EMV compliance relates to the hardware housing the terminal, which must have a higher degree of security to prevent people from accessing the keys to the data.  The next stage of EMV compliance (Level 2) refers to the software. Transactions happen between the POS device and bank exclusively, removing liability from the kiosk operator.  

EMV compliance can be complicated and costly, but it marks a significant shift in liability in the U.S.  Using a secure payment gateway can help to streamline this process for kiosk operators and remove the burden of securing EMV certifications for each payment type.

Other Benefits of Gateways for Kiosk Operators

While direct integration can be time-consuming and expensive, integrating with a gateway provides kiosk operators with several key benefits that reduce ongoing operational costs, labor and maintenance.

  • More Options and Flexibility

Gateways typically enable the ability to connect to more processors than direct connections so merchants have the freedom to choose the partners that work best for their business.  The more connections and channel partners that your gateway provider offers, the more flexible payment options that are available for kiosk merchants.  With customer analytics growing quickly, kiosk merchants can provide a customized experience for their users, including user recognition through card number, email address and more.

  • Top-Notch Security

Be sure to select a gateway provider that has a reputation for top-notch safety and security.  Features to look for include advanced security features like end-to-end encryption, tokenization and hosted payment screens, in addition to EMV compliance for a comprehensive layered security approach.

  • Industry-Specific Solutions

Gateway technology can be tailored for a variety of niche markets like vending, parking, car washes, golf courses, and ticketing, plus a wide array of traditional payments terminals, so look for a provider that meets your specific vertical market needs.

  • Semi-Integrated Solutions to Save Time and Effort

Semi-integrated solutions allow kiosk operators to add EMV support quickly and easily using their existing payment solutions, saving significant time, effort and resources.  EMV reduces the liability for kiosk merchants, shifting more liability to the cardholder’s bank, significantly reducing risk to the kiosk merchant.

  • Increased Growth Potential

Gateway providers sometimes have a large reseller base.  For those that do, granting kiosk operators access to the gateway’s reseller base gives those kiosk operators connections to potential channel partners, greatly increasing growth opportunities.

  • Speed & Service

Gateways should provide a consistent level of service to enhance the payment process for the customer.  Speed of a transaction is especially important during heavy use.  A slow system can drive customers away during the payment process and reduce the sales volume. Kiosks must be able to function well at a high volume without the system slowing or shutting down.

  • Dynamic Routing for Fast and Easy Payment Device Management

Gateways should feature dynamic routing across platforms and services, meaning devices are boarded once and can send transactions anywhere.  This consolidates payments and data from different platforms into one simple, easy-to-use interface, and translates across reporting, risk management and billing for all devices, which dramatically reduces the work required to maintain these connections.  As kiosk users are generally untrained, a fast, reliable experience is required to maintain current users and gain new users. Sales are often abandoned due to system delays or an interface that is not user friendly. Look for a gateway provider that allows acquired portfolios of devices to easily be added, and supports functions like recurring billing.

  • Preferred Rates

Some gateways can convey preferred rates for small-ticket Visa and MasterCard transactions, further validating the ROI of connecting to a gateway, especially for kiosk markets with lower average sales tickets.

  • Flexibility to Support New Technology

Gateway providers continually add support for new payments technologies as they emerge, which helps future-proof solutions and keep them compliant with updated PCI regulations.  Ensuring the kiosk merchants can utilize the latest mobile options, such as Apple Pay, Wallet and more with a future-proof solution.

Which Integration Path is Right for You?

Establishing and maintaining individual connections with processors may seem more empowering and cost-effective at first glance, but it can be quite costly and resource-intensive over the long term.  Many payments solution providers are turning to gateways to provide their merchants (and customers) with more options.  However, each kiosk provider or merchant must weigh the pros and cons, and choose an integration path that works best for their business.

By Justin Passalaqua
Director of Sales at Apriva, LLC
jpassalaqua@apriva.com
(480) 423-7724

For more information on payment gateways and processors visit Apriva website.




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Telehealth Kiosk – KioWare Exhibiting at ATA show – free passes

Telehealth kioskWe will be showcasing KioCall Video Conferencing at Telehealth 2.0 in Orlando, Florida from April 23rd to the 25th at the Orange County Convention Center in Booth 1319.  If you are interested in visiting the showcase or meeting with our team, we have tickets available for your use. Please email sales@kioware.com for tickets to the show or to request a KioCall demo.

The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) invites you to Orlando, Florida, for its annual conference. The ATA 2017 International Conference & Tradeshow is the world’s premiere event in the telehealth industry that brings together professionals to share their expertise and knowledge with their peers. The conference provides an invaluable education experience and an opportunity to attend over 100 sessions that highlight the hottest topics in the telemedicine industry. Take advantage of the multitude of networking opportunities with telehealth professionals from across the industry.  Program information.

Free registration info

As a valued customer and friend we want to invite you to come see us at our booth at ATA 2017: Telehealth 2.0 / The Transformation Advantage – April 23-25, 2017at the Orlando Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. In fact, we want to provide you with free Exposition only admission to attend!

Exhibit hours are:
Sunday, April 23rd, 12:30pm-5:30pm
Monday, April 24th, 9:30am-6:30pm
Tuesday, April 25th, 10:00am-1:00 pm

The ATA 2017: Telehealth 2.0 | The Transformation Advantage has been bringing together healthcare executives involved in telemedicine for over 20 years. ATA’s Corporate Members and Exhibitors are recognized as industry leaders in the fields of telemedicine, telehealth and mHealth. Come and connect with the decision makers of the healthcare industry at ATA 2017 in Orlando! BUT DON’T DELAY! Register today and take advantage of this offer. This offer is only valid by using the link above.

Registration is quick & easy!

For more information, please visit: www.ata2017.org




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Sneaker Kiosk Vending Contest

MALVERN, Pa.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–USA Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ:USAT) (“USAT”), a payment technology provider of cashless and mobile transactions in self-serve retail, today announced that Sneaker Syndicate, a high-end athletic shoe boutique in Orlando, Florida, has launched a series of self-serve amusement kiosks that allow consumers to win sneakers, which leverage USAT’s ePort Connect® cashless payment systems.

According to AnythingResearch, the amusement arcades market is approaching being a $2 billion industry, and cashless payments represent a huge growth opportunity for the still largely cash-based market. With what we believe to be a low barrier to entry, this is an industry ripe with opportunity. Sneaker Syndicate has deployed USAT’s cashless payment technology on an amusement “Crane Game” as part of a marketing strategy for its retail location. For five dollars, shoppers could test their luck at winning high-end footwear such as Adidas Yeezy Boosts or Nike Air Jordans – sneakers that range in value between $300 and $2,000.

[Here is separate writeup on game site with pictures]

One month after installing USAT’s state-of-the-art ePort Connect cashless payment systems onto a small number of the store’s amusement machines, sales nearly doubled, with cashless transactions accounting for about 45 percent of the machines’ intake. Given the positive results, the company now plans to expand its business over the next two years with additional machines at a variety of East Coast locations.

sneaker vending kiosk“Because of USA Technologies, we are developing franchise agreements with companies across the East Coast for our popular high-end shoe amusement machines,” said Stewart Bryant, owner, Sneaker Syndicate. “The ability to easily accept payments using the ePort platform has made a critical difference for us. This technology has opened the door to a new world of amusement and vending games.”

Implementing ePort Connect on its kiosks has given Sneaker Syndicate the ability to track the acceptance of cash, credit/debit cards, NFC and mobile wallet payments such as Apple, Android and Samsung Pay. The connected nature of the devices also gives the growing company critical remote access to sales and payout data for all of its machine locations.

“The opportunity for the unattended retail market is greater than ever. In the amusement and gaming industry, going cashless not only enables more payment options, and increased revenue potential, but also allows for the sale of game credits. Additionally, the MORE loyalty program facilitates repeated sales of games,” says Maeve Duska, senior vice president of Sales and Marketing, USA Technologies. “More and more consumers are also going cashless simply recognizing that the convenience of paying with their mobile wallet is as simple as tap and go.”

Useful Links:
USA Technologies:
USA Technologies: https://usatech.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/usa_tech
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/USATechnologies
Resource Center: https://usatech.com/resource-center/the-benefits

Sneaker Syndicate:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sneakersyndicate

Sales and Partnership Inquiries:
Please contact USA Technologies, Inc. at +1 800.633.0340 or sales@usatech.com.

 




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DMV Kiosk – MVD offers time savings with self-service kiosk

DMV kiosk
DMV kiosk by Olea Kiosks. Click for full size image.

KINGMAN – Who doesn’t want to save time and avoid standing in line?

Fifty-one percent of all transactions done at the MVD can be completed at the self-service kiosk or the department’s online portal, ServiceArizona.com, said Douglas Nick, spokesman for the MVD.

Customers can take their vehicle registration notice and scan the bar code into the kiosk, then pay with either a credit or debit card, Nick said.

Getting a duplicate driver license or ID, change of address and specialty plates are all functions the kiosk can perform without the help of a customer service representative, according to the release.

Kiosk transactions increased across Arizona from 21,991 in February last year to 36,899 the same month this year, the release states.

Full article

 




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New self-service border kiosks launching at Ottawa airport; roll-out to continue across Canada this year

border kiosks
Click to see full image

OTTAWA, ONTARIO–(Marketwired – March 17, 2017) – Canada Border Services Agency

Today, the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, and Mark Laroche, Ottawa International Airport Authority President and CEO, announced that Primary Inspection Kiosks will be operating at the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport starting Monday, March 20, 2017. Minister Goodale also announced that “CanBorder – eDeclaration,” the Government of Canada’s mobile declaration application, will be ready for use with the new kiosks at Ottawa airport on Monday.

Primary Inspection Kiosks are next generation technology that will expand current self-service options for international air travellers arriving in Canada. The new kiosks will launch first at Ottawa airport, with select airports to follow later this year.

The new kiosks will allow travellers to verify their travel documents, complete an on-screen declaration, and confirm their identity using facial authentication (involving only a one-to-one photo comparison at the kiosk with the traveller’s passport). Those looking to save more time can complete their declaration in advance using the CanBorder – eDeclaration mobile app, which will give them a quick response (QR) code to scan at a kiosk upon arrival.

Primary Inspection Kiosks will be rolled out at Canada’s major airports this year, strengthening border security and simplifying the border experience. By moving towards digital declarations, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is capitalizing upon the experience and successes of other countries that have adopted automated border technology.

Quotes

“Smart border management includes leveraging technology to improve security and help reduce wait times at Canada’s busiest airports. The Government of Canada is committed to using digital tools to improve services to Canadians and international travellers, ensuring smooth and efficient airport experiences.”

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

“Using technology for more efficient border processing is welcome news for returning residents, and will enhance the passenger experience for arriving visitors. We thank the CBSA for allowing our airport to be the first to introduce the Primary Inspection Kiosks, and will continue to engage with our partners to make efficiency initiatives a recurring theme in all projects at the Ottawa International Airport.”

Mark Laroche, Ottawa International Airport Authority President and CEO

Quick Facts

  • Primary Inspection Kiosks will eventually replace the Automated Border Clearance program, streamline services for travellers arriving in Canada by air, and allow the CBSA to better manage increasing traveller volumes at airports.
  • The on-screen declaration and mobile app will allow the CBSA to phase out the standard distribution of declaration cards on board aircraft, reducing paper consumption and allowing for cost savings through digital service delivery.

Related Links

Primary Inspection Kiosks

CanBorder – eDeclaration app


Quote from Embross:  Ottowa is the first Airport that deployed the option last month using Embross V-APC Kiosks. http://www.embross.com/kiosks/

Toronto is also installing PIK before VVR installs their own version at Vancouver.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/kiosk-airport-cbsa-app-1.4031840

http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/new-self-service-border-kiosks-launching-ottawa-airport-roll-out-continue-across-canada-2203842.htm

Our first APC kiosks were delivered in 2003, I see information on YVR(BoarderXpress) and SITA, but nothing on our hundreds of Nexus and APC kiosks.

Embross North America, Ltd., a Canadian based organization founded upon the acquisition of IBM’s Travel & Transportation Kiosk group, including both its people and solutions, by Embross Holdings Pty Ltd. and represents more than 50% of airport kiosks in the market (Check-in, APC BagDrop, and software related etc..)

Embross’s history of being first to market:

  • First check-in kiosks in the mid-1990’s
  • First CUSS kiosks in 2002 (Our CUSS platform is the “IBM” and “ARINC” platform as many know those names more than “Embross”.)
  • First Biometric APC Kiosks in 2003
  • First ADA Accessible Kiosks in 2004
  • First RFID Bag Tag 2010…
  • First Mobile Check-in kiosk
  • most recently, first PIK Kiosk in 2017.



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Five Improvements for Dealer Display

Designing displays for dealer networks in the flooring, paint, and home improvement industries can be challenging. Here are five things you should consider, from David Anzia, Senior Vice President – Sales, Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.

Find the full blog here, named “Five improvements for successful dealer display programs”: http://www.frankmayer.com/blog/five-improvements-for-successful-dealer-display-programs/

Here is FMA_March-2017_5DevelopmentQuestions_Flooring.

Dealer display
Click for full size

 

Dealer display
Click for full size



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Border kiosk – YVR develops next-generation BorderXpress kiosks

Vancouver International Airport (YVR) today announced its proprietary line of self-serve border control solutions, BorderXpress, has been expanded to meet the requirements of Canada Border Service Agency’s (CBSA) new Primary Inspection Kiosk (PIK) program. YVR will roll out 90 new PIK configured BorderXpress Kiosks in spring 2017. YVR is proud to be an integral part of CBSA’s objective to modernize the border entry process for air travelers.

BorderXpress was developed by Innovative Travel Solutions, an independent business unit within YVR with more than a decade of experience in kiosk design, user experience, layout and flow analysis.  BorderXpress has proven to be a very efficient tool to reduce border line ups, while at the same time strengthening the safety and security of borders. More than 1,050 kiosks are currently in use at 34 airport and seaport locations, processing over 100 million passengers to-date – more than any other provider.

BorderXpress can be easily configured to meet the needs of governments around the world looking to implement technology solutions to reduce border line-ups and improve the safety, security and integrity of their borders.

The full press release is below and attached.

YVR develops next-generation BorderXpress kiosks to meet the needs of the Canada Border Services Agency’s new border clearance program

Automation offers expedited process for international arriving passengers

 Richmond, B.C. April 5, 2017: Vancouver International Airport (YVR) today announced its proprietary line of self-serve border control solutions, BorderXpress, has been expanded to meet the requirements of Canada Border Service Agency’s (CBSA) new Primary Inspection Kiosk (PIK) program. Under the PIK program, the CBSA is expanding its use of border kiosks at Canadian airports, and will now offer self-service options to an increased number of incoming international travelers.

“Border clearance kiosks are the way of the future and we applaud the CBSA’s continued efforts to expand the use of kiosks to reduce border wait times while meeting evolving security needs,” said Craig Richmond, President & CEO, Vancouver Airport Authority. “Not only do our BorderXpress solutions provide a modern and efficient experience for our passengers, they are also a smart choice for airports and government, as they help to reduce overall operating costs and free up border officers to focus more closely on enforcement and intelligence efforts.”

YVR will roll out 90 new PIK-configured BorderXpress kiosks in Spring 2017, extending the automated border clearance process to the majority of incoming international travelers. Using the new kiosks, passengers will scan their travel documents, complete their declaration and verify their identity and admissibility using facial recognition technology before proceeding to a CBSA officer for final inspection. This process will ultimately reduce time spent with the CBSA officers and decrease overall processing times. The addition of the new BorderXpress kiosks will help YVR meet its goal of handling 25 million passengers by 2025 while still providing exceptional customer experiences.

As part of the CBSA’s objective to modernize the border entry process for air travelers, the paper declaration card will be eliminated. BorderXpress PIK technology will now handle this function and passengers will complete paperless declarations directly at the kiosks. Passengers can save even more time by completing their declaration in advance using the eDeclaration (Beta) mobile app, and scan their quick response (QR) code at a BorderXpress kiosk upon arrival.

BorderXpress was developed by Innovative Travel Solutions, an independent business unit within YVR with more than a decade of experience in kiosk design, user experience, layout and flow analysis.  BorderXpress is marketed to airports around the world and more than 1,050 kiosks are currently in use at 34 airport and seaport locations — more than any other provider.

BorderXpress kiosks help immigration officers process up to four times more passengers per hour than through traditional clearance; and, as of March 1, 2017, BorderXpress kiosks have processed over 100 million passengers.  BorderXpress can be easily configured to meet the needs of governments around the world looking to implement technology solutions to reduce border line-ups and improve the safety, security and integrity of their borders.

-YVR-

About Vancouver Airport Authority

Vancouver Airport Authority is a community-based, not-for-profit organization that manages Vancouver International Airport (YVR). Canada’s second busiest airport, YVR served 22.3 million passengers in 2016. Fifty-five airlines serve YVR, connecting people and businesses to more than 125 non-stop destinations worldwide. In 2016, YVR received CAPA Centre for Aviation’s prestigious Airport of the Year Award and was voted Best Airport in North America for the eighth consecutive year in the Skytrax World Airport Awards in 2017. Vancouver Airport Authority is a dedicated community partner and in 2016 donated more than $1,000,000 to local organizations. We are committed to creating an airport that British Columbia can be proud of: a premier global gateway, local economic generator and community contributor. For more information, please visit www.yvr.ca.

 

For further information:

YVR Media Relations

604.880.9815; media_relations@yvr.ca

Twitter: @yvrairport

Innovative Travel Solutions

www.yvr.ca/inv

inv@yvr.ca

 

 

2017_04_05_PIK-Release_Trade_FINAL




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