Tag Archives: antibacterial

Antibacterial Kiosks – CDC on Contaminated Surfaces

Excerpt and noted on Yahoo News 5/19/2020. Thanks to Qwick Media & Olea Kiosks crowdsource reporting.

CDC: Coronavirus spreads through person-to-person contact – not via contaminated surfaces

Korin Miller WriterYahoo Life

 

Even before COVID-19 officially had a name, public health officials said the virus could be transmitted through infected respiratory droplets and by touching infected surfaces and then touching your nose, mouth, and possibly your eyes. So, people began snatching up face masks, wearing gloves, and ramping up hand hygiene to try to protect themselves.

While touching infected surfaces has always been part of the messaging on how the virus spreads, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently shifted its stance online. The CDC now says that COVID-19 spreads from person to person contact, and then lists touching infected surfaces under a section titled, “The virus does not spread easily in other ways.” The CDC adds: “This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about this virus.” The language is a subtle change from the organization’s warning in early March, when it wrote simply that it “may be possible” to spread the virus through contaminated surfaces.

The CDC, which did not respond to Yahoo Life’s request for comment, still recommends that you wash your hands often with soap and water, and routinely clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces to protect yourself and others from the virus.

Read full article Noted on Yahoo News 5/19/2020.

Antibacterial Kiosk Touchscreen Wipes Coatings

Temperature Kiosks

 

Innovation Award for UV-C Disinfecting Light for Kiosks

Editors Note: Back in 2016, four years ago, we were given an award for developing UV-C technology embedded in a patient check-in kiosk. We looked at many potential solutions, and the final two candidates were UV-C and Copper. Copper has some real advantages, and it has the data and the approvals to go along with it. Like any other solution, though, it has its disadvantages. It kills bacteria, but the rate of kill is slower. It is safer, but it is more expensive. A targeted, comprehensive approach to battling bacteria is the best approach. In the end, for the kiosk, UV-C was the clear winner.

The question might be why were more not sold then. Good question. And we think the answer is again, a combination of factors. The two primary ones are 1st; there was no subsequent independent lab testing. That costs money, and a small company must be frugal—secondly, the cost premium. Too often, customers, even those in the public health sector, see the least price, and make the short term cheaper selection.

Four years later, they are maybe adding all types of antibacterial protection, and issuing press releases how they are “now” better serving their patients. They could have been sending out PRs that from the get-go, they have always cared. Plus they would’ve saved the additional money. And likely, fewer patients might have been infected at the hospital.

For a full wrap on antibacterial solutions, including Copper and UV-C, see the main Antibacterial page here onsite. We’ve included at the bottom of the article below, the useful UV-C links.

Our recommendations for these technologies at the current time?

  • Copper plodding on fixtures, handles in facilities is a good idea
  • Spot cleaning with handheld UV-C during maintenance cycles is good
  • There are now UV-C systems for ceiling lights which sanitize the air in the room (think sitting in a dentist office or chair e.g.)

The following is the originally posted press release from 4 years ago.


Original Source: was — http://www.latestsharenews.com/story/83966/connected-technology-solutions-takes-innovation-award-for-uvc-disinfecting-light-for-kiosks.html

 

MENOMONEE FALLS, WI – 11 May, 2016 – Connected Technology Solutions, a Menomonee Falls, Wis., based manufacturer of kiosks and related self-service technology, has been named a winner of the 2016 I.Q. Innovation Awards for CleanTouch™, its ultra-effective UV-C light surface sanitizing solution.

CleanTouch™ is available on the company’s Patient Passport Express®, which is marketed as part of the CTS Healthcare Services® division. The PPE is a robust kiosk that provides check-in, bill-pay and other patient-facing functions at many of the country’s leading healthcare facilities, such as Cleveland Clinic, Ohio State University Health Systems and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Antibacterial kiosk
Click for full image

By employing a continuous bath of UV-C light across the kiosk’s touch surfaces, CleanTouch™ rapidly kills up to 99.9-percent of bacteria and viruses, leaving the screen clean for subsequent users. After each transaction, when the user steps away, a quick 30-second wash of light disinfects the screen, making it clean and ready for the next patient.

IQ Award 01

The award ceremony was held in Milwaukee the week of May 17th.  Sharing the stage with CTS were such nationally known companies as Astronautics Corp. of America, Briggs & Stratton and Fiserv Inc.  Accepting the award for CTS were Jared Timm and Craig Keefner.

Note –  Another very cool company there in a speaking role was Scanalytics which does floor sensors for measuring footfall.  Impressive stuff.


UV-C Resources

Self-Service Kiosk Cleanliness – Before and After Deployment Considerations

Editors Note: This article was originally published on https://olea.com. We also recommend reviewing our section on AntiBacterial Kiosk Cleaners.


Clean Kiosks – Considerations Before and After Deployment

September 25, 2018

Kiosk cleanliness is a significant factor in ensuring peak performance and maximum uptime.

All too often, deployers look at interactive kiosks as a sort of “set it and forget it” device, paying little attention to the units once they’ve been placed.

If the units are performing as expected, why rock the boat? A kiosk that’s doing its job can free staff up to perform more complicated tasks, speed up operations and result in increased revenue.

But failing to give a kiosk a bit of love every now and then can lead to heartbreak down the road. Left unattended, the units can get dirty, inadvertently turning off potential users and creating an impression that can transfer to other aspects of the business. If a self-order kiosk in a restaurant lobby is filthy, what does that say about the kitchen?

In addition, with every user interacting with the same touchscreen, is that device serving as a transfer point for all types of nasty bugs? Is it any wonder that major supermarkets always provide antibacterial wipes for their customers to wipe down their shopping carts?  It’s expected and it is the first impression walking into the store.

Keeping a kiosk clean isn’t just about creating a good impression. Regular attention can also go a long way to extending the life of the of the unit, keeping it doing its job for years to come.

At the drawing board

The process of keeping a kiosk clean and in good working order begins with the design of the unit itself.

Do enclosures include keyed access panels that make it easy for staff to clean the inside of the enclosure while preventing unauthorized people from tampering with the inner workings? Is the PC and other components plans in such a manner that they are easily accessible?

Have the designers taken into account where the device will be located? A kiosk located outdoors near the beach will likely require more robust filtration than one located in a doctor’s office, while a self-order kiosk in a fast-food restaurant might need filters that protect the inner workings from grease buildup as well as front-facing fluid ingression resistance (aka IP65).

If the kiosk will be located in a parking garage, the enclosure itself might need to incorporate a coating that will protect it from car exhaust in addition to the day-to-day dirt buildup.

Enclosures for outdoor kiosks will also need to include robust gaskets and seals to protect inner circuitry from the elements and be designed in a manner that prevents water from pooling anywhere on the unit.

And anywhere there is specific cooling or heating involved there is an air intake, which means there will be air filters that require regular maintenance.

Different paint treatments for enclosure color will make a difference as well.  A textured paint will show a lot less dirt than a stainless steel finish. Outdoor units will also need to include climate-proof coating to protect it from humidity and other environmental factors.
Dallas Fort-Worth Airport Customs Kiosks - Maintaining High-Traffic Kiosks

Kiosk Maintenance in the field

The real challenge in keeping a kiosk clean comes after the unit is placed into service.

Of course, the component that will need the most attention is the touchscreen. Depending on the use, the screen could interact with hundreds of users a day.

Touchscreen cleanliness can be of critical importance when deployed in health care facilities, where many of the users may be sick, or in an international airport, where users may be coming from all around the world.

A recent study conducted by Insurancequotes.com tested samples from a variety of surfaces at three different major U.S. airports and found that touchscreens harbored more than twice as many “colony-forming units” of bacteria and fungus as the toilet flush button in an airplane restroom. Although the study wasn’t large enough to draw a scientific conclusion, it did indicate that kiosk touchscreens require special attention when it comes to cleanliness.

Interactive Kiosk Cleaning and Maintenance

Still, deployers need to check and see what the manufacturer recommends when it comes to cleaning a touchscreen. Many screens have an “oleophobic” coating that is resistant to fingerprints; some cleaning chemicals can remove that coating. Fingers typically have a certain amount of body oil; just look at screen of your mobile device for proof. There are also a number of antimicrobial wipes on the market designed for cleaning touchscreens.

Before adopting any product making antimicrobial claims, deployers should seek out the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for that product. Most are available online. The Kiosk Industry website is also a good place to obtain information about cleaning products.

If a deployer does use cleaning products to clean a kiosk touchscreen, most deployers recommending spraying those chemicals on a cloth rather than spraying them on the screen itself.

For the enclosure itself, in many cases water and mild soap are sufficient for cleaning, taking care to ensure air vents are free of debris. A small handheld vacuum can be used to clean dust buildup from the inside of the enclosure (taking care not to damage circuit boards). That’s also a good time to check filters and replace them if needed.

A best practice example would be to adopt the same cleaning schedule as your customer counter.  In the morning wipe the kiosk touchscreen with something like Easy Screen and ideally at the end of business wipe it again.  Every day. Also any contact points, and while you are at it, do your mobile phone too!

Contracting the work

Unfortunately, in many businesses kiosk maintenance is close to the bottom when it comes to the list of priorities.

As kiosks have become more commonplace, though, a number of companies have sprung up to provide regular maintenance. For a deployer with dozens or hundreds of kiosks, farming out maintenance may be an option.

In addition to cleaning those kiosks on a regular basis, technicians can check fans, filters and other interior components for dust buildup and check connections to ensure they stay secure.

While hiring an outside company to conduct kiosk cleaning and perform preventive maintenance obviously comes with a cost, it may be negligible compared with costs of downtime and the impact of having customers see a dirty unit.

At the end of the day, the best way to ensure a fleet of kiosks achieve maximum uptime is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who can recommend the actions a deployer can take to keep a kiosk clean and operational. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.