Tag Archives: olea

New Outdoor Kiosk Model Released by Olea Kiosks for Outdoor Ticketing – the Geneva aka “the Swiss Army Knife”

New Outdoor Ticket Kiosk Design by Olea Kiosks

From LinkedIn Aug2020 – Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks announced on LinkedIn yesterday his new outdoor ticketing kiosk, Geneva.  Has some very nice engineered design features.  Olea is at the top of outdoor kiosk design so it isn’t surprising at all to see this very nice unit.

Frank Olea
Frank Olea CEO, Olea Kiosks Inc.

“I’m proud to announce our newest Kiosk model, the Geneva. This kiosk design is ultra-versatile and is available in Outdoor as well as Indoor versions. It’s our ‘Swiss Army Knife’ hence, Geneva.”

This new indoor / outdoor kiosk provides for printing tickets, wristbands, cards or even plain old receipts. The 27” high brite LCD display is sure to get the message out that you are open for business. This is also our first model to feature contactless touchscreen options as well.

A closer look

Outdoor ticketing kiosk
You can click the image and see a full screen image detailing the nice engineering touches Olea did.

Get more info on Geneva Outdoor Kiosk

 

Website Link


 

Kiosk Design 101 – How To Mount Epson desktop printer in a Kiosk

Frank Olea
Frank Olea CEO of Olea KIosks

Effective kiosk design comes over years of experience and here is a short video on one of the more common designs: integrating a common desktop POS printer like the Epson T88 into a kiosk. Providing the design tip is Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks, Inc. one of the largest, if not largest privately owned American kiosk companies.

The Epson is an extremely popular printer for Point-Of-Sale as it is very reliable, small and fits easily on a desktop. Normally in a kiosk a printer designed for kiosks is used typically known as an open-frame.

Here the equation is reversed.

Designing a POS printer into a kiosk can be tricky. They weren’t designed to be stuffed into a box. A little extra effort has to be made to make paper changes easy and for the paper to actually come out of the kiosk. If you must use a desktop product make sure you do it right.

Olea Printer from Kiosk Manufacturer Association on Vimeo.

The discussion and video with comments is available on LinkedIn

More Olea Kiosk Information

https://kioskindustry.org/olea-recruits-kiosk-industry-expert-rusty-gaynes-to-serve-as-director-of-strategic-alliances-and-partnerships/

https://kioskindustry.org/temperature-check-kiosks-available/

Olea Recruits Kiosk Industry Expert Rusty Gaynes to Serve as Director of Strategic Alliances and Partnerships

LOS ANGELESJuly 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Olea Kiosks, Inc., a leading provider of innovative self-service kiosk solutions, announces the hiring of channel sales and partnerships industry expert, Rusty Gaynes, as Director of Strategic Alliances and Partnerships. Olea Kiosks has more than 40 years of experience helping companies realize their ambitions deploying self-service solutions, and Gaynes was hired to further develop and expand the strategic direction of Olea’s software and hardware partners.

With more than 20 years of sales experience in technology and related industries, Gaynes most recently managed and developed channel sales and partnerships for Verifone as it acquired kiosk provider Zivelo.

“We’re excited about building on Rusty’s rich industry experience and his successful track record with those partnerships,” said Olea Kiosks, Inc. CEO Frank Olea. “With Olea’s in-house advanced design and manufacturing and our operational agility, we’re looking to further leverage technology to enhance the end-user experience. Rusty brings a depth and breadth of knowledge to help us continue to build an ecosystem centered around self-service delivery that allows Olea to attract and evolve with the most diverse and innovative partners to solve our client’s most difficult challenges,” added Olea.

“Throughout my career, I’ve witnessed how quality business relationships help achieve tremendous results,” said Gaynes. “Olea’s industry leadership and focus on the customer experience of the future puts a priority on convenience and I look forward to accelerating that across the various vertical markets,” added Gaynes.

While Olea has always leveraged its deep relationships with software and hardware partners, point-of-sale (POS) providers, back-end integrations, physical installation and support teams to deliver business value on its client’s behalf, the company is looking to make those relationships even stronger. Olea is eager to adapt new technology to drive innovation and improve the customer experience as it explores new opportunities including contactless technology, automation, artificial intelligence, and data analytics.

About Olea Kiosks, Inc.

Olea Kiosks is a self-service kiosk solution provider for the attractions and entertainment, healthcare and hospitality industries. Its technologically advanced, in-house manufacturing, design, and innovation have made it an industry leader.

Headquartered in Los Angeles, customers include The Habit Burger Grill, Kaiser Permanente, Empire State Building, Universal Studios, EVO Entertainment, Scientific Games, and Subway.

Information: https://www.olea.com/.

*VIDEO: https://vimeo.com/413109587

*PHOTO: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/20-0715s2p-Rusty-Gaynes-300dpi.jpg

This release was issued through Send2Press®, a unit of Neotrope®. For more information, visit Send2Press Newswire at https://www.Send2Press.com

SOURCE Olea Kiosks, Inc.

Related Links

https://www.olea.com

https://kioskindustry.org/temperature-check-kiosks-available/

https://kioskindustry.org/kiosk-about/charter-sponsors/olea-kiosk/

 

In the wild – Olea Kiosks at Scientific Games

Scientific Games Gaming Kiosk

gaming kiosk

Monte Carlo kiosk by Olea Kiosks at recent Scientific Games tradeshow in Las Vegas

From Olea Website

Versatile Kiosk for Ultimate Performance
A modern approach to the player experience

Our latest winning kiosk for casinos features card-printing and vibrant LED lighting that can be controlled remotely or programmed, and its sleek design fits in any décor.

The Monte Carlo boasts robust components that stand up to 24/7 use. Two large LCD panels create a rewarding touch experience for users, while the highly visible digital signage is perfect for advertising, wayfinding and more.

Temperature Check Kiosks – Olea

Temperature Kiosks Olea Kiosks –  Delivering

Temperature checks on employees and visitors is becoming commonplace for many businesses, hospitals, grocery stores, retailers and a host of others. Temperature sensing kiosks can help stem a crisis and optimize a return to business as employees and guests return to work and entertainment venues.

Olea Temperature Sensing Kiosk from Craig Keefner on Vimeo.

Reference page on Olea Kiosks Website

olea-temperature-kiosks from Kiosk Manufacturer Association on Vimeo.

Benefits of Temperature Check Kiosks

The Temperature Sensing Kiosk provides a number of benefits to allow businesses to protect their most valued assets–their employees.

  • Reduce risk of access by infected persons*
  • Maintain a safe work/business environment
  • More hygienic than thermometers that require physical contact
  • Safer and more efficient than using a human resource to screen temperatures
  • Reduce stress and anxiety for employees and guests.

Prevention is the Key

There are many activities happening simultaneously to ensure a safe work environment.  The Temperature Sensing Kiosk reduces the risk of infection to your employees and costly and time-consuming contamination clean-up efforts.  Give employees and visitors the confidence to know you’re doing all you can do to protect them.

How It Works

The Temperature Sensing Kiosk is equipped with an infrared temperature sensor/detector and the system provides an alert if an individual is running a fever. The system uses an algorithm for fast detection temperature accuracy.

Protect Your Investment

Your people are your most valuable investment. To help stem the crisis and optimize a return to business, hospitals, grocery stores, and retailers and a host of other companies will look to temperature screening as employees report to work and venues open up again. This first layer of screening can curb the spread of virus as well as prevent costly and time-consuming contamination clean-up. This solution is equipped with an infrared temperature sensor/detector and the system provides an alert if an individual is running a fever.

  • Stop infection at the door
  • Maintain a safe work/business environment
  • More hygienic than thermometers that require physical contact
  • Safer and more efficient than using a human resource to screen temperatures
  • Avoid costly contamination clean-up
  • Reduce stress and anxiety for employees and guests

Specifications:

  • Uses an algorithm for object heat and fast detection temperature accuracy • +/- 0.5 degrees Celsius
  • Android Operating System and Software included
  • 1 second refresh rate
  • Scans people from 20 to 39 inches from kiosk

Olea Kiosks. Redefining Self-Service Technology.

For more information email Olea Kiosks or send contact form.

 

More Information

Frank Olea – I believe that as we venture back out into public places we’re all going to want to see what has been put in place to make us feel safe. Something visual and useful like hand sanitizer in the right places is a good start. Standing next to a bank of kiosks or mounted directly to the kiosk means I can use this machine without fear because I can immediately clean my finger afterward. Sometimes it’s the simple solutions.

Additional Temp Check Kiosk Links

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes Olea Kiosks – Outdoor Kiosk Design

Olea Showing New Healthcare Offerings at HIMSS

Vista Cinema and Veezi Approve Olea for Self-Service Ticketing Kiosks

Moe’s Southwest Grill First Kiosk-Only Restaurant is Now Open

Moe’s Southwest Grill launched its first-ever kiosk-only restaurant this past weekend in Pittsburg, PA.

The kiosk-only restaurant, owned and operated by Moe’s multi-unit franchisee, Mike Geiger, seats 16 and features Moe’s new brand design. The build took approximately 10 months to complete, with the final inspection scheduled for one day after the city shut down due to COVID-19 (March 13).

This timely launch provides a more contact-less ordering option in the time of Covid-19, as well as additional sanitation efforts have been put in place in accordance with CDC guidelines. This is just the latest in a string of new product offerings and technological advancements the brand has put into place since March of this year. Other examples include:

  • A completely revamped app which launched earlier this month
  • Launch of Taco Kits for easier family-style dining at home
  • The announcement of Moe’s Market, where stores would sell bulk ingredients that were in low stock at local markets.
  • Free delivery via the Moe’s app March 16-April 17
  • Ramped up curbside dining
  • Across Moe’s more than 700 restaurants, provided thousands of meals to healthcare workers and first responders

Background Summary

Restaurant kiosks and demographics

Restaurant kiosks

QSR kiosks are big these days and the poster child might be Paneras actually though for sure McDonalds “once again into the fray” efforts bring a lot of attention (ditto for Wendy’s and others). Good quote from Olea and good article.

Source: www.qsrweb.com

Here were the demographics

  • 18-24 year olds are more than 70 percent likely to visit a restaurant if it had a kiosk option;
  • 25-34 year olds are 65 percent more likely to visit;
  • 45-54 year olds are 60 percent more likely; and
  • 55+ year olds are 40 percent more likely.

Digital Signage Airport – in the Wild – Nice shot of Dallas DFW airport kiosk for Decaux

Airport Digital Signage Deployed Decaux in Dallas DFW Airport

Nice shot of unit in DFW for Decaux

Credit: this is a kiosk designed and built by Olea Kiosks. Deployed many of them across DFW in 2016 and 2017.

Casino Kiosks Prove to be a Sure Bet

Casino Kiosks

Casino operators are gambling that new kiosk functions will help them provide top-notch customer service to help them cater to existing customers and win new ones.

hooters_girl
Hooters Vegas kiosk by KIOSK in Colorado. Click for full size image

By Richard Slawsky, Contributor

Years ago, casino bosses were able to recognize their guests by sight, providing complementary rooms and other perks to high rollers to keep them playing.

Today, keeping track of customers’ playing habits and providing those comps by sight is impossible. In addition, most casinos depend far more on the retirees playing slots in the afternoons and on the weekends for their bread and butter than they do the whales dropping a few grand at the blackjack tables.

And with gaming revenue for US casino operators topping $183.8 billion in 2015, up 56 percent from $117.6 billion in 2010, keeping those core customers happy is of prime importance. Kiosk technology is helping to accomplish that task.

Beyond the slot club

These days, catering to a casino’s customers is as much a science as it is an art form.

Kiosks in the Casino

  • Self-service technology benefits both the player and the house

For the player

  • Look up points and “comps”
  • Enter daily promotions and giveaways
  • Check promotions and print coupons
  • Easily locate favorite machines
  • Easily locate restaurants, shops and other property amenities

For the house

  • Enroll new loyalty members
  • Print customized player’s club loyalty cards
  • Eliminate lines at customer service
  • Deploy manpower to more complicated tasks
  • Check-in/check-out at resort hotel
  • Print boarding basses for departing guests

When casinos made the transition from mechanical games to digital ones in the 1980s and 1990s, it opened to door to technology that helped them spot their most profitable patrons. Loyalty programs, originally called “slot clubs”, began appearing in many of the larger casinos. Customers would sign up for player cards, and in return for loyalty to a particular casino they would receive reduced-rate or complementary rooms, access to special events, free meals and more. Players would insert their cards into a slot machine or other gaming device, with their level of rewards dependent on their overall playing time (or money wagered).

The loyalty cards provided a flood of analytics for casino operators, allowing them to track the playing habits of individual patrons and reward them accordingly, as well as letting them see which games were the most popular and kept patrons playing the longest.

And because kiosk technology had long been a feature of casinos in the form of ATMs, it was only a small step to adapt the technology to loyalty cards, allowing a player to swipe their card to see what rewards they had earned.

“Certainly, I think part of the idea is to improve customer service,” said David McCracken, CEO of York, Pa.-based kiosk software provider Livewire Digital.

“The technology has allowed casinos to reduce the number of people lined up at a customer service desk,” McCracken said. “It’s good for the customer but it’s also good for the casino, by getting those customers out of the lines and back to the tables.”

Stratosphere ticketing kiosk
Click for full-size image. Stratosphere ticketing kiosk

Today, it’s not uncommon the see players swipe their card at a loyalty kiosk, only to return to the gaming floor to play enough to reach the next level of rewards.

“There are many days when casino properties are getting busloads of people, and they can get pretty crowded,” McCracken said. “The self-service capabilities of kiosk technology have helped casinos reduce the manpower needed to provide a lot of the basic functions to take care of their guests, while improving customer service at the same time.”

Building on success

As the capabilities of kiosk technology have grown over the years, so have the services offered by those devices.

Livewire, for example, has worked with Foxwoods Resort Casino in Ledyard, Conn., for more than 10 years. Foxwoods is the largest casino in the world with more than 340,000 sq ft of gaming space serving more than 40,000 guests per day. The resort also features a hotel with 1,416 rooms and a two story arcade for children and teens.

foxwoods kiosk
Click to see full sized image

Because Foxwoods’ existing kiosks were becoming dated and offered limited functionality, in 2007 management tapped Livewire to update their machines to a more modern design while adding new functionality for members of the casino’s popular Wampum Rewards Program. Instead of having patrons wait in line at a customer service desk to do things such as redeem points for promotional rewards, Foxwoods wanted to make those services available at the kiosk.

Livewire ultimately developed a software solution that integrated the Wampum Rewards Program with Foxwoods’ Casino Management System and Slot Data System. In addition to being able to swipe their loyalty cards to view point balances, patrons can enter sweepstakes, sign up for events and obtain personalized rewards in the form of coupons and bonus slot tickets.

Digital signage mounted on the kiosks above the touch screen interfaces display advertising and other casino information such as drawing winners and jackpot payouts. Livewire has more than 80 kiosks deployed around the Foxwoods property.

Expanding functionality

ticketing kiosk
Click to see full-sized image

The features being incorporated into kiosks at the casino are being expanded on a regular basis. New functions include wayfinding, food and drink ordering and directing guests to their favorite gaming machines.

“I’m also seeing a little bit of interest in functions such as player registration, where people can register for slots tournaments and things like that,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Cerritas, Calif.-based Olea Kiosks Inc.

Olea Kiosks is a leading manufacturer of loyalty program kiosks for the gaming industry. The company also serves sectors including higher education, government, human resources, retail and hospitality.

“We’ve seen some new card printers come out that offer the ability for kiosks to hold multiple types of cards and have the ability to print a guest’s name on them,” Olea said. “That allows the casino to store different levels of player loyalty cards and then print on those, so the guest doesn’t have to go to customer service to get a new card.”

The appearance of the devices is changing as well.

“Look and feel is changing in the gaming world,” said Liz Messano, sales manager with Las Vegas-based SlabbKiosks. Along with casinos, SlabbKiosks’ customers include government organizations, universities, financial institutions and healthcare providers.

“Big and clunky is becoming a thing of the past, so casinos and such are looking to the kiosk industry to help them with this transition,”  Messano said.

And because many casinos are attached to hotels, companies are incorporating kiosk functions geared to guests spending their vacations on the property.

“At MGM Resorts, kiosks help us to enhance our service to guests,” said Mary Hynes, director of corporate communications with Las Vegas-based MGM Resorts International. “At our ARIA and Monte Carlo resorts in Las Vegas, we plan later this year to begin offering check-in and check-out at kiosks as an option for our guests. We also offer Internet kiosks where guests may print their boarding passes.”

Aria casino kiosk
Click to visit site

The ARIA Resort & Casino and the Monte Carlo are just two of the 14 properties MGM operates in Las Vegas. The company also operates resorts in Mississippi and Michigan, and holds interests in four other properties in Nevada, Illinois and Macau, China.

 

So with the gaming industry becoming increasingly competitive even as it grows and properties becoming ever more creative in their efforts to attract new patrons, the race is on to develop new self-service capabilities that can be incorporated into the kiosk. The capability of the technology is limited only by the imagination of the people developing those capabilities.

“It’s a mature technology but we get requests all the time for new functions,” Olea said. “It’s probably time that we start looking at making the kiosk do things beyond what they already do. You’ve got the machine and you’ve got a captive audience but it’s time to start expanding their use.”


casino kiosk Editor Note:  Las Vegas and the casinos are a big market for the kiosk industry.  Some other iterations or examples we would offer would be hybrid player & dealer interactive tablets where the two-sided table offers one view to the player and one to the dealer. This one was for casino in Macao and designed by CTS of Wisconsin. FourWinds Interactive for interactive application.

kiosk-gaming-cropped
Some units by KIOSK

Some of the most demanding applications are ones like the M3T and others. For more information visit http://kiosk.com/market-solutions/gaming

Here is a gallery of Olea gaming kiosks. Click for full size. For more information visit http://www.olea.com/product/gaming-kiosk/

Finally if it is gaming, then we should mention Dave and Busters which is one of the longest running applications and has seen multiple iterations. See http://kioskindustry.org/interactive-kiosk-dave-busters/ interactive kiosk

DMV Kiosk – MVD offers time savings with self-service kiosk

KINGMAN – Who doesn’t want to save time and avoid standing in line?

Fifty-one percent of all transactions done at the MVD can be completed at the self-service kiosk or the department’s online portal, ServiceArizona.com, said Douglas Nick, spokesman for the MVD.

Customers can take their vehicle registration notice and scan the bar code into the kiosk, then pay with either a credit or debit card, Nick said.

Getting a duplicate driver license or ID, change of address and specialty plates are all functions the kiosk can perform without the help of a customer service representative, according to the release.

Kiosk transactions increased across Arizona from 21,991 in February last year to 36,899 the same month this year, the release states.

Full article

 

Self-Order Drive Thru Technology Overview

In February 2020, we helped create a presentation on current drive thru technology as used in self-order. As an information service to readers here is the presentation.

To Request More Information

  • For information specific to Olea Kiosks please email info@olea.com and mention KMA Drive Thru info
  • For general information on technology and application you can also contact Craig at craig@kma.global

Actual Presentation in PDF form

Drive-Thru-Intel Olea Overview-Outdoor-Rev4-compressed

Related Information

Self-Service Kiosks — Reducing Risk of Virus Transmission

Excerpt from Olea Kiosks website March 2020

Since the onset of COVID-19, there have been many questions posed about how to help mitigate the spread of the virus. How much worse the situation gets depends on our ability to contain and mitigate risk as it relates to the people and places we visit.

That being said, we’re all being encouraged to limit our exposure to large venues with vast numbers of people.  Public health officials are advising we limit our person-to-person interaction to reduce the probability of contact between persons with the virus, and the spread of airborne particles to minimize transmission from one individual to another.

As we limit human to human interaction to reduce the risk of transmission, we, as an industry, can talk about the value of continuing many day-to-day tasks by moving that interaction to a more preferable human to machine interface like kiosks.

Limit Person-to-Person Interaction

Self-service kiosks, in any environment, can help to limit person-to-person interaction, in turn, reducing the risk of transmission of disease or virus between staff and patients or guests. Because most person-to-person interactions occur within close proximity, and often entails talking, the passing back and forth of credit cards or some other form of payment, and a receipt, it escalates the chances of exposure.  The preference is for patients or guests to interact with a Kiosk rather than with staff at the reception desk.

At a reception desk, the risk escalates because lines are more likely, there is interaction between the staff and guest, and viruses can linger in the air and on the desk. While the desk can be cleaned between guests, it’s challenging to wipe the surface and maintain guest flow at the same time. However, this can be easily done with a kiosk.

Kiosks, used in any situation, can limit the contact between staff and guests.  This is true for Healthcare providers with check-in kiosks, ticketing kiosks at movie cinemas or amusement parks, food ordering kiosks, transportation, parking and just about any application you can think of.

Antibacterial and antimicrobial cleaning and disinfecting for self-service kiosks
o Place anti-bacterial wipes at the kiosks for users to perform a cleaning before/after their use.
o Having hand sanitizer to use before and after kiosk use will also help to mitigate the transfer of microbes from person to person via the kiosk glass touchscreen.
o Consider having a staff person come in periodically during the day/peak times to perform some of the activities listed below to instill additional confidence in users.

 

Read full article at Olea Kiosks website

Biometric Security Screening Kiosks by CLEAR

CLEAR Biometric Kiosks St. Louis
This is not the full image. Click on it to go to the original article — Anthony Sansone Jr., from St. Louis, gets instructions from Breanna Evans on the new scanners at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport on Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The new scanners from the Clear company scan either a person’s fingers or iris to make a positive identification. Airport travelers have to sign up for the service that will let them avoid showing any other identification. Photo by J.B. Forbes, jforbes@post-dispatch.com

From St. Louis Dispatch Feb 2020 — ST. LOUIS COUNTY — St. Louis Lambert International Airport on Monday launched its new biometric security screening alternative in Terminal 2 — the one housing Southwest Airlines’ operations.

The new CLEAR biometric system, which identifies people via fingerprints and the iris of their eyes, is available to passengers who pay up to $179 a year for the privilege. Those using it get through security lines a bit faster.

Editors Note: CLEAR works with Olea Kiosks on these kiosks.

More CLEAR related news

CLEAR Makes Cincinnati Its 30th Airport Location

Biometric Kiosks Come to Car Rental Check-In and Check-Out Using Facial Recognition

Biometric Kiosk Deployed by NY Mets with CLEAR, Aramark and Mashgin

Charter Sponsor Series Review – Olea Kiosks

kiosk privacy screens Olea
Example of privacy screens. Image courtesy Olea Kiosks. Click to see full size

We update and refresh our Charter Sponsors content and one of our original Charter Sponsors is Olea Kiosks.  Their original charter sponsor page was done many years ago and today we updated it (several http links instead of https e.g.).

In the years since Olea joined Kiosk Industry it has grown into arguably the largest privately-held US kiosk company, in the US. A couple of rebrandings and the inevitable “new” website has made the scene.

For more information about Olea the easy thing to do is send an email to info@olea.com

QSR Kiosk

More about Olea Kiosks

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes Olea Kiosks – Outdoor Kiosk Design

 

Vista Cinema and Veezi Approve Olea for Self-Service Ticketing Kiosks

Ticketing Kiosks Examples by Olea

Ticketing Kiosks and Hotel Check-In Kiosks by Olea

Included here are some recent pictures and video covering ticketing kiosks and hotel check-in kiosks by Olea. Olea Kiosks specializes in ticketing kiosks both indoor and outdoor as well as Check-In Kiosks. Olea is a Gold Sponsor of KMA.  For more info contact info@olea.com

Here is video from the floor

Pictures of Check-In Kiosks Vegas Hotel

Turnkey Bill Payment Kiosks

New Turnkey Bill Payment Solution

Olea has released a new bill payment website.   Payment Kiosk by Olea.

Excerpt: Kiosks that handle cash and other forms of payment are the most complex of self service kiosk designs. Don’t trust just anyone to design and manufacture your next financial service kiosk.  Led by Olea Kiosks we work with best-in-class partners to bring you a complete bill payment solution.

Franklin Bill Payment Kiosk
New Franklin Payment Kiosk

Payment Solutions cover a large range of situations from the simple purchase to more complex deployments.

We offer two turnkey solutions at this time: The Caddo and also the The Creek. Bill payment available for purchase, lease or operation (revenue share) and beginning at $30K complete solution.

We offer three different base  + custom models for bill payment.

Applications range from your basic bill payment (paying your Comcast bill for example) to alimony to robust mobile bill pay. Indoor, Outdoor, Wall Mount, Standup, Countertop, Drive Thru.
Underbanked, non-banked and the kiosk industry
Some of the strongest growth the kiosk industry is seeing these days is in the self-order arena, specifically in fast-food restaurants. Those transactions are typically $20 or less, right in the sweet spot for cash usage.
Billpay kiosks are growing in popularity as well, targeting underbanked consumers or those who don’t have the ability to pay bills online. Some of the deployed applications include water bill payment, electricity bill pay, gas bill pay and light bill pay. 30% (and rising) of the US population is lower class living in apartments, renting housing. 25% of the US population is unbanked or underbanked according to a 2017 survey by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp and that number is considered low. Again, the type of people who are likely to favor cash.
So if credit cards are the only payment option, a company that relies on self-service kiosks may be missing out on substantial revenue opportunities.
Still, accepting cash does present obstacles deployers need to overcome. And with the use of alternative forms of payment on the rise, deployers need to plan for those as well.

Payment Kiosk Franklin Olea PDF Brochure

Bill Payment Functionality Examples

Centralized electronic bill presentment and payment portal for customers of the city.

– Provide custom API’s or batch process to support non-integrated systems.
– Provide self-service abilities such as AutoPay, interactive pay by text, interactive email, and scheduled payment sign ups.
– Provide ability to pre-authorized payments including sending notification for expiring credit cards and utilize available database from visa and Mastercard. Manage rejected payments, sending notification to the customer and notifying city staff.
– Provide self-service to start or stop utility service or edit customer information on existing utility account. Or automatically generate orders for agency and provide an upload process for ownership and lease documents.
– Customer service rep assisted IVR capability. Provide the ability to track a customer’s call in-progress when passed to IVR for payment and assist customer needs if they need CSR (customer service rep) assistance.
– Ability to send friendly reminders, courtesy interactive email notifications and SMS text to accounts with a balance due.
– Automatic account linking for customers with multiple accounts, including linking of different bill types in single customer view.
– View multiple bills with a ‘consolidated’ view.
– Single payment capability for multiple bills and multiple bill types, and correct application of relevant service fees.
– Provide an itemized detailed receipt where one or multiple services are being paid for, and indicate where service fees are being charged to the customer.
– Provide ability to make payments via Web, Mobile, IVR, Kiosks, and POS systems.
– Reconciliation and reporting capabilities. Create adhoc and custom reports during implementation phase to meet our requirements.
– Implementation services.
– On-going technical support and maintenance of the portal site.
– Detailed reporting for fee statements and most efficient solution for charging fees.
– Flexible solution allowing the city to absorb credit card fees for most transactions and pass along credit card fees for selected transactions.
– Product and solution will be in compliance with city specific rules governing transaction fees or service fees.
– Allow the following transaction types: Credit Card, Debit, Check, Cash, ACH and trust account payments.
– Portal shall provide for payments and funds from different departments to be directly deposited into proper city account with unique identifiers to ensure that the funds are appropriately credited to the respective accounts.
– Handle dispute resolution and repudiation for non-ACH transactions.
– PCI Level 1 compliance and other information security standards.
– Allow point-of-sale (POS) transactions in various locations across multiple departments to include cashier stations, wireless transactions (kiosks) and portable device card transactions for use in the field. Provide necessary equipment for these services.
– Provide necessary equipment for these services.
– Provide citizen mobile application for web portal (iPhone, Android, tablet device, etc.) or provide mobile adaptive website
– Provide continuous availability of web portal with system redundancy and “up-time” guarantees or contingencies.
– Help desk and assistance point of contact for both the citizens or users of the portal and city administrators and accounting personnel.
– Provide the ability to utilize chip technology or develop in the future.
(2) Contract term will be one year.


Bill Payment News Release — Here is preliminary presss release on the Franklin

Olea Kiosks Introduces The Franklin Bill Pay Kiosk

LOS ANGELES, Calif., October 9, 2019 — Olea Kiosks of Los Angeles welcomes the Franklin Bill Pay kiosk as the newest addition to its self-service line-up.  This secure and versatile kiosk is built to handle payments of any kind, anywhere.

The Franklin Bill Pay kiosk has the ability to accept and dispense dollar bills, dispense coins, read checks and take credit card payments.  Because it’s a modular solution, it can be customized in a number of pre-designed configurations which make it easy to deploy in situations with first to market opportunities or where time is of the essence.

This kiosk was introduced for those industries that still have a high number of cash-paying customers.  “In the past, cash-handling kiosks were very costly to deploy, but with this solution, we’ve implemented some standardizations, which makes complete self-service operation attainable,” explained Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks. The unit can be equipped with several different models of bill acceptors and dispensers to accommodate all manufacturers and compatibility with almost any software application.

The Franklin is perfect for any cash-paying application including Bill Payment, Retail Transactions, Ticketing, Food Ordering, and Hotel Check-in which makes it an ideal candidate for casinos as they can deploy the same look and feel across a number of different guest services. (if we can get the Casino page updated we can link it here)

The Franklin will be on display at the JCM Global booth 4039, at Global Gaming Expo (G2E) in Las Vegas, October 15 to 17.  Olea Kiosks can also be seen at work in a number of other booths demonstrating a range of applications including player loyalty, player games and tournaments, betting applications and food ordering. You can find more information here:

About Olea Kiosks:

Olea Kiosks Inc., is a Los Angeles-based self-service kiosk manufacturer in business since 1975.  Its technologically advanced, in-house manufacturing and services have made it an industry leader.

For more information, visit https://www.olea.com/.

Major Bill Pay Kiosks Projects Background

  • Verizon Mobile Bill Payment
  • AT&T Mobile Bill Payment
  • Comcast Cable Payment

Related Bill Payment Kiosk News

Where is EMV for Kiosks in 2019? An EMV Update

Bill Payment Kiosk Provisioning – Industry Whitepaper

The benefit of bill-payment kiosks

Self Order Kiosk for QSR – Broncos Technology – Mashgin, Aramark, Appetize

A fan uses the visual-recognition system to purchase concessions at Empower Field at Mile High earlier this fall. Credit all photos: Paul Kapustka, MSR (click on any picture for a larger image)

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Can technology finally help improve one of the biggest pain points in the game-day experience, namely waiting in line for concessions? At the Denver Broncos’ Empower Field at Mile High, a number of new technology initiatives debuted this year, all designed to improve the fan experience around concession purchases by providing more choice and streamlined checkout procedures.

While there are no hard numbers yet on the experiments, a Mobile Sports Report visit to Mile High earlier this year saw heavy use of the new technologies, which mainly include touch-screen ordering and payment systems as well as an innovative visual-recognition device to tabulate items in grab-and-go scenarios. A few quick interviews with fans at the stands got mixed reactions on whether or not the new technology actually speeded up the processes, but some stopwatch clocking showed speedy checkouts, especially those using the visual-recognition technology, where items are placed on a scanner bed which then quickly recognizes and tabulates the total on an attached payment screen.

For those of us who are now (maybe unwillingly) becoming accustomed to checking out our own items at supermarket self-checkout terminals, the Broncos’ stands that utilize the visual-recognition devices (from a company called Mashgin) are far easier to use than trying to scan a barcode for each item. At Mile High, the scanners are the perfect endpoint for a series of stands called “Drink MKT,” which are basically spaces with coolers filled with multiple beverage choices, from bottled water through multiple types of beer and other alcoholic drinks, including $100 bottles of John Elway Cabernet. At those stands fans simply walk in, choose what they want from a cooler and queue up for the scanners. When items are placed on the scanner beds the system’s cameras detect the items and generate a total bill, which is paid for by credit card on an attached terminal. Human-staff intervention is only needed to check IDs and to help fans open up the beverages before they leave the stand.

Editors note: lots of pictures included in original article

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Dennys Tablet Kiosk – Presto Selected Exclusive Pay-At-Table Technology

Denny’s Tablet Kiosk is Presto Pay-At-Table

Press Release

Presto has been selected to deploy its industry-leading pay-at-table tablets at participating Denny’s restaurants across America

Dennys tablet kiosk
Click for full size

Presto, the restaurant industry’s end-to-end front-of-house (FOH) technology platform, has been selected by Denny’s, one of America’s largest full-service family restaurant chains, as the exclusive provider of its guest-facing pay-at-table solution. The solution is designed to provide a superior guest experience, real time payments, and a range of operational benefits.

This partnership with Presto will enable Denny’s to offer their guests a powerful, next generation pay-at-table experience. It will also deliver a significant return on investment by generating additional revenue streams, faster table turns, low processing costs, and improved loyalty program enrollments leading to more repeat visits. The Presto tabletop tablets have an intuitive user interface offering other rich guest features such as consumer feedback surveys and loyalty program integration. They have a low profile and space-saving industrial design, which does not intrude upon the dining experience.

Before making this strategic decision, Denny’s conducted a thorough evaluation of Presto through pilot testing. The Presto tabletop tablets proved to be easy to use and were well received by both restaurant staff and guests. Denny’s was also able to identify and measure a variety of tangible benefits generated by Presto. These include improvements in staff efficiency, generation of a robust premium content revenue stream, and a significant increase in guest feedback via Presto’s survey feature.

“We like to empower our operators with solutions that make sense for their business,” said Dave Coltrin, Denny’s Vice President of Guest Experience & Marketing Intelligence. “Presto’s next-generation tabletop tablets present a unique, cost-effective opportunity for our operators to deliver a superior guest experience and streamline in-restaurant operations.”

Presto tabletop tablets are the most secure and support the widest range of pay-at-table options in the industry. They are also a unique platform to offer promotions, upsells, entertainment, and guest surveys — all of which can be refreshed every couple of days. Presto’s pay-at-table experience supports all the latest EMV and mobile payment technologies, including Apple Pay, Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chip-and-PIN, Chip-and-Signature and PIN-Debit.

“We are excited to be selected by Denny’s as their exclusive pay-at-table technology partner,” said Rajat Suri, Founder and CEO of Presto. “This is a validation of the strong value offered by the Presto platform and Denny’s desire to bring the most innovative technologies to their operators.”

With Presto, Denny’s guests will also benefit from the industry’s highest standard of payment security (that includes full P2PE encryption) and the fact that they can pay at the table without giving up control of their credit or debit card. After payment, receipts can be automatically emailed for signed-in guests, saving paper and maximizing convenience.

About Denny’s

Denny’s is one of America’s largest full-service family restaurant chains, currently operating more than 1,700 franchised, licensed, and company-owned restaurants across the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Philippines, New Zealand, Honduras, the United Arab Emirates, Costa Rica, Guam, Guatemala, the United Kingdom, Aruba, El Salvador, and Indonesia.

About Presto

Founded in 2008 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and now based in Silicon Valley, California, Presto is transforming the age-old restaurant industry through the creation of innovative, enterprise-grade technologies. Offering the industry’s end-to-end front-of-house (FOH) technology platform, Presto enables revenue growth and profitability while enhancing guest experience. The highly customizable platform includes powerful solutions for guests (kiosk, mobile, tabletop), servers (server handheld, line buster, wearable), and managers (analytics, AI, computer vision). Presto is currently the leading provider of front-of-house technology in the industry and is used by 10 out of the top 20 restaurant chains in the U.S. including Applebee’s, Denny’s, and Outback Steakhouse.

Touchscreen FAQ – Are All Kiosk Touchscreens Created Equal?

Interactive Touchscreen Comparison

olea kiosk Interactive touchscreens come in several varieties. Here’s a quick overview of the types and the applications to which each is best suited.  Whitepaper by Olea Kiosks

Although interactive touchscreens have been around in one form or another since the late 1970s, over the past 10 years or so they’ve become an integral part of our lives.

In fact, thanks to the iPhone, tablet computers and similar devices, we’ve become accustomed to the idea that we should be able to touch the screens we see and get a reaction. Interactive touchscreens are a central feature of devices ranging from ATMs to wayfinding kiosks to the photo kiosks common in drugstores around the country.

A Research and Markets study valued the size of the interactive display market at $9.9 billion in 2015, with that market estimated to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 15.5 percent over the next five years, reaching $26.9 billion by 2022.

Interactive displays include a variety of technologies, though, and not every technology is suited to every application.

Touchscreen Type

Stacking them up

According to the industry trade publication Control Design, there are five main types of touchscreens: resistive touch, infrared touch, surface capacitive, surface acoustical wave and projected capacitive. Each has its advantages, disadvantages and applications for which it is best suited.

Resistive Touchscreen

A resistive touchscreen is made up of several thin layers, including two electrically resistive layers facing each other with a thin gap between. When the top layer is touched, the two layers connect and the screen detects the position of that touch.

“Resistive touch is a very old technology that some companies still offer as their go-to,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“It works great in places with dust and grease, such as fast food restaurants, and its low price point can make it attractive for those with a limited budget,” Olea said. “I personally don’t care for it because it makes the image on the screen appear hazy and it wears out over time.”

In addition, resistive-touch screens are unable to perform the multitouch functions that are becoming increasingly popular.

touchscreen technology OleaInfrared Touch

For very large displays, infrared touch is the most common application. Instead of a sandwich of screens, infrared touchscreens use IR emitters and receivers to create an invisible grid of beams across the display surface. When an object such as a finger interrupts the grid, sensors on the display are able to locate the exact point.

Advantages of infrared touch are excellent image quality and a long life, and they work great for gesture-based applications. In addition, scratches on the screen itself won’t affect functionality. In many cases, touch capability can be added to a display through the use of a third-party overlay placed on the existing screen.

On the downside, infrared touchscreens are susceptible to accidental activation and malfunctions due to dirt or grease buildup. They’re also not suited to outdoor applications. In addition, while adding an overlay is a relatively quick way to convert a large display into a touchscreen, extra care must be taken in mounting that overlay to ensure touches match the image displayed on the screen.

Surface Capacitive Touchscreeens

Surface capacitive screens have a connective coating applied to the front surface and a small voltage is applied to each corner. Touching the screen creates a voltage drop, with sensors on the screen using that drop to pinpoint the location of that touch. Advantages of surface capacitive technology include low cost and a resistance to environmental factors, while disadvantages include an inability to withstand heavy use and a lack of multitouch capability. Those screens are also limited to finger touches; the technology won’t work if the user is wearing gloves. DVD rental company Redbox uses surface capacitive screens in their kiosks.

Multitouch Touchscreen Technology

Other types of touchscreen tech offer the potential of more complicated functions thanks to their ability to sense several touches at the same time. Multitouch applications might include functions performed with two or more fingers, such as pinching or zooming of images. Larger displays might allow for interaction using two hands or even two users.

SAW Touchscreen

Surface acoustic wave or SAW displays use piezoelectric transducers and receivers along the sides of the screen to create a grid of invisible ultrasonic waves on the surface. A portion of the wave is absorbed when the screen is touched, with that disruption tracked to locate the touch point.

“We tend to lead with surface acoustic wave,” Olea said.

“The transparency of the glass on an SAW panel is pretty good and the touch tends to be very stable and not require frequent calibration,” he said. “On the other hand, it doesn’t work well outdoors or anywhere there is grease or high amounts of dust, such as near parking lots, in warehouses things like that. Also, you can do 2-point touch on SAW although pinching, zooming, and applications such as on-screen signatures don’t work very well.”

Projected Capacitive or PCap Touchscreens

Last on the list of dominant touch technologies is projected capacitive technology. PCAP is a relative of capacitive touch, with the key difference being that they can be used with a stylus or a gloved finger. Projected capacitive touchscreens are built by layering a matrix of rows and columns of conductive material on sheets of glass. Voltage applied to the matrix creates a uniform electrostatic field, which is distorted when a conductive object comes into contact with the screen. That distortion serves to pinpoint the touch.
Milan Digital Kiosk - touchscreen technology
Projected capacitive and its cousin surface capacitive are relatively new technologies, similar to what’s in a smartphone. Both offer opportunities not possible with resistive and infrared touch screens.

“Capacitive technology is born and bred for multi-touch,” Olea said. “And because the touch technology is embedded in the glass it offers superior resistance to wear, vandalism and gives you a very clear, bright screen.”

Olea uses projected capacitive technology in all of its outdoor kiosk products.

“Projected capacitive screens are still fairly expensive compared with other types of touchscreens, mostly because the technology is new and there isn’t a ton of high-quality manufacturers out there making them,” Olea said. “Metal can also interfere with the function of the PCAP technology, so the integrator or kiosk designer should know what they are doing to ensure the product works as advertised.”

Choosing a Touchscreen

The final determination

Ultimately, the type of touchscreen a deployer chooses to incorporate into their application will be determined by factors including the deployer’s budget, the environment in which the device will be placed, the function the device will perform and the deployer’s plans for any future applications.

Order entry screens in the kitchens of a small fast-food restaurant chains would obviously call for resistive touch technology, for example, while a 72-inch display in a hotel lobby or shopping mall would call for infrared touch. An “endless aisle” or catalogue lookup kiosk where a shopper may want to enlarge an image of a particular product might work fine with a surface acoustic wave or surface capacitive screen, while wayfinding kiosks on a college campus or city street would likely call for projected capacitive technology.

Perhaps the deployer has plans to implement more advanced functions down the road, and wants to future-proof their investment. In that case, they may need to choose between a surface capacitive or projective capacitive screen.

At the end of the day, the best way to choose a touchscreen best suited to the application for which it will be used is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

ADA and Accessibility Touchscreen Access

One interesting aspect of touchscreens is which ones should I use for disabled users with prosthetics?

The answer is you need to use Infrared or Resistive touch technology as the prosthetic will generally not have a path to ground and that is required for something like PCap.

Related Posts

Touchscreen Surface Treatments

Antibacterial Kiosk Touchscreen Wipes Coatings

Olea Kiosks Introduces The Franklin Bill Payment Kiosk at G2E

Olea G2E Press Release

Franklin Bill Payment Kiosk LOS ANGELES, Calif., October 10, 2019 — Olea Kiosks of Los Angeles welcomes the Franklin Bill Payment kiosk as the newest addition to its self-service line-up.  This secure and versatile kiosk is built to accept payments of any kind, anywhere.

The Franklin Bill Payment kiosk has the ability to accept and dispense dollar bills, dispense coins, check acceptance and take credit card payments.  Because it’s a modular solution, it can be customized in a number of pre-designed configurations which make it easy to deploy in situations with first to market opportunities or where time is of the essence.

This kiosk was introduced for those industries that have a high number of cash-paying customers.  “In the past, cash-handling kiosks were very costly to deploy, but with this solution, we’ve implemented some standardizations, which makes complete self-service operation attainable,” explained Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks. “The unit can be equipped with several different models of bill acceptors and dispensers to accommodate all manufacturers. In addition, we work with a suite of turnkey application providers including M3t Financial Services, Nanonation, Self-Service Networks and Dynatouch that can be integrated into the kiosk,” added Olea.

The Franklin is perfect for any cash-paying application including simple bill pay, bill breaking, ATM services, and check cashing.  With its loyalty features like club enrollment with card printing, point redemption, promotional games, TITO ticket printing for promotion vouchers, and bar code/QR code scanning for text/email promotions, it’s an ideal candidate for casinos as they can deploy the same look and feel across a variety of guest services.

The Franklin will be on display at the JCM Global booth 4039, at Global Gaming Expo (G2E) in Las Vegas, October 15 to 17.  Olea Kiosks can also be seen at work in a number of other booths demonstrating a range of applications including player loyalty, player games and tournaments, sports betting applications and food ordering. You can find more information here:

About Olea Kiosks:

Olea Kiosks Inc., is a Los Angeles-based self-service kiosk manufacturer in business since 1975.  Its technologically advanced, in-house manufacturing and services have made it an industry leader.

For more information, visit https://www.olea.com/.

Certified EMV Cloud Kernel – Payment Kiosk

News from a payment kiosk application provider for Olea Kiosks

Dylan Waddle
Dylan Waddle – EMV & Mobile Payment Technology, Business Growth Strategy, PCI Compliance, IOT, SAAS

The M3t EMV Cloud Kernel is designed to easily connect unattended kiosk terminals and POS solutions to a level II / III approved kernel for processing credit and debit card transactions. The kernel was certified for use in the U.S. in January of 2018 and is now connected to over 3,000 terminals across the country. As a cloud based solution our technology no longer relies on a specific operating platform on the terminal itself, providing our customers ultimate flexibility.

payment kiosk M3TFS

More Payment Kiosk information

Where is EMV for Kiosks in 2019? An EMV Update

 

 

The benefit of bill-payment kiosks

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes Olea Kiosks – Outdoor Kiosk Design

LOS ANGELES, Calif., June 20, 2019 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — Olea Kiosks of Los Angeles, has been recognized by Frost & Sullivan with the 2019 Customer Value Leadership Award for its self-service kiosk manufacturing and focus on designs for outdoor use.

Olea Kiosks
Olea Kiosks is recognized not only for its technologically advanced and custom kiosks, this award also acknowledges its high standards for in-house manufacturing and services to make it an industry leader.

Frost & Sullivan evaluated Olea Kiosks in two main areas: Customer Ownership Experience and Customer Service Experience. Kiosks give businesses the opportunity to put the customer in the driver seat and in control of their transaction, and with sleek, modern, aesthetically-pleasing designs, Olea delivers a positive experience for today’s user.

Olea is redefining self-service technology with innovation that makes the transaction experience faster, more reliable and easier, particularly in the outdoor space. With several custom, outdoor designs completed and installed, Olea has earned a reputation for providing high-quality kiosks for challenging environments, including outdoor tourist attractions subject to varying temperatures and weather elements.

“Self-service kiosks in demanding environments, such as outdoor locations, face performance and frequent maintenance challenges. With its superior product design knowledge and expertise, Olea has virtually eliminated outdoor maintenance issues for its clients. Such high levels of customer satisfaction have resulted in more than 200 Olea-built drive-thru kiosks installed across the United States, with more to come,” stated Nandini Bhattacharya, Industry Manager, from Frost & Sullivan.

Since 1975, Olea Kiosks has designed and installed more than 20,000 custom kiosks for companies including CLEAR and Kaiser Permanente. Its custom kiosks can be seen throughout the United States and in other countries. Olea has a custom design process to ensure the kiosk is built and deployed to deliver the business outcomes for which it was intended.

About Olea Kiosks:

Olea Kiosks Inc. is a Los Angeles-based self-service kiosk manufacturer in business since 1975. Its technologically advanced, in-house manufacturing and services have made it an industry leader.

For more information, visit https://www.olea.com/.

VIDEO (YouTube): https://youtu.be/KwvBMjXbcsA

*PHOTO link for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/19-0620s2p-olea-kiosk-300dpi.jpg
*Caption: Custom ticketing kiosk by Olea Kiosks.

DSE Video edited outdoor designs Drive Thru

Olea Kiosks

ABOUT THE NEWS SOURCE:

Olea Kiosks Inc., is a Los Angeles-based self-service kiosk manufacturer in business since 1975. Its technologically advanced, in-house manufacturing and services have made it an industry leader.

More Information: https://www.olea.com/

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Five Top Trends in QSR 2019

A host of new technologies are on the horizon for the QSR industry. For many of them, a self-order kiosk will serve as their foundation.

Quick-service restaurants have long had a reputation for being innovators when it comes to technology. In the early days of modern foodservice, QSRs were among the first to incorporate features such as drive-thru speaker system and cooking timers. Later, computerized point-of-sale systems and digital menu boards emerged.

More recently, it’s been mobile apps, online ordering and point-of-sale systems that trigger menu boards to display promotions or remove items based on low inventory levels. Facial and AI-based response systems now generate context. Moreover, of course, one of the most significant technological trends affecting the QSR industry over the past few years has been the self-order kiosk.

Customer Data Context

However, the developments haven’t stopped there. All of these trends have one feature in common: They provide operators with a firehose of data they can use to improve their operations.

McDonald’s, for example, acquired software company Dynamic Yield in March for $300 million, giving it technology that will allow it to customize digital menu boards based on data including time of day, weather and current ordering trends to deliver a more personalized in-store experience. The fast-food giant also took a stake in software company Plexure in April, giving it access to a mobile platform that uses digital marketing tools to increase sales. The platform manages mobile-based promotional offers and a customer loyalty program as well as serving as the backbone of McDonald’s mobile app.

Elsewhere, self-order kiosks at some locations of the South Florida-based BurgerFi chain are incorporating facial recognition technology that gives customers the option of saving previous orders along with phone numbers and facial geometry. The next time a customer visits a location, they’ll be recognized by the kiosk and will be given the option to use that stored information on their current order. Other chains including Dallas-based Malibu Poke, Pasadena, Calif.-based Caliburger and Philadelphia-based Bryn & Dane’s are using variations on the technology.

Drive-Thru Ordering

Because 70 percent of the revenue for a typical QSR comes via the drive-thru, it only makes sense to look there as an avenue for technological improvements. Digital menu boards have been appearing in drive-thru lanes for several years, and will likely be standard going forward. Companies including Dunkin’ Brands have eyed dedicated pickup lanes for mobile orders as a way to eliminate bottlenecks, although the idea seems to be slowly gaining traction. Also, several kiosk manufacturers have introduced devices designed for the drive-thru in recent years as restaurant operators seek to duplicate the success of dining-room self-order technology. Olea Kiosks’ Detroit model was an early entry into that category. Technology provider Xenial, which provided the facial recognition application for Bryn & Danes, has installed touchscreen drive-thrus in nearly 400 Subway restaurants to date. Drive-Thrus have become so popular that some countries (Canada) and US cities are looking at restricting drive-thru’s.

Location-Based Customer Service

Location technology and geofencing appear to be an up-and-coming trend, with its potential demonstrated by Burger King’s recent Whopper Detour promotion. Customers who participated in the promotion, which ran in mid-December 2018, could purchase a Whopper for just a penny via their mobile app, as long as they were within 600 feet of a McDonald’s. Other applications for the technology include alerting restaurants when a carryout customer pulls into the parking lot, with restaurant staff then delivering that customer’s order to their car.

Voice Command

And likely coming soon to a QSR near you is the same voice-ordering technology that drives the Alexa and Google Home devices in our living rooms. A voice-command POS would be a boon to labor-strapped restaurant operators who see their counter staff turn over on a near-weekly basis, while a voice-operated phone system in a pizzeria could free up staff to pitch in on the makeline. Such systems would never be rude to customers, will reduce errors compared with a live order-taker, and of course, will always remember to suggestive sell. Industry groups have already formulated frameworks for voice command concerning disability and accessibility.

Automation – The Robots have arrived.

Artificial Intelligence or AI-based systems are already being tested. Holly, made by Valyant A.I., is a disembodied voice that takes drive-through orders at a Good Times in South Denver.

The Colorado fast food chain started experimenting with conversational A.I. to lighten the load of some of its employees who often juggle multiple tasks at the same time. Rob Carpenter, the founder of Valyant A.I., said the hospitality industry needs robots right now to make up for the lack of applicants.

“In the United States, because it’s such a tight labor market, there’s somewhere in the neighborhood of 800,000 unfilled positions,” Carpenter said.

Olea's Austin Freestanding Self-Order Kiosk

Self-Service kiosks are driving trends

Many of these up-and-running technologies are likely to be incorporated into the self-order kiosks that have been at the heart of recent restaurant trends. There are plenty of reasons why: Research conducted by financial news site PYMNTS.com found that consumers spend as much as 30 percent more at a self-order kiosk compared with other ordering methods. Self-order kiosks allow easy customization of orders, never forget to suggestive sell and eliminate the “indulgence guilt” that can occur when ordering extra-large fries or an apple pie for dessert.

Others are seeing even more significant results. Point-of-sale platform Appetize recently reported that users of its self-service solution see a 40 percent increase in order size. Appetize’s Interact self-service solution offers embedded upsell functionality, and data shows that consumers are 47 percent more likely to add an item on a kiosk than when asked to do so by a cashier.

Research from ordering technology firm Tillster indicates the use of self-order kiosks will continue to grow for the foreseeable future. A 2018 Tillster study found that 54% of customers plan to place an order with a self-service kiosk within the next year, and if the line to order from a cashier is longer than five people, 75 percent of customers will choose to order from a self-service kiosk.

And although mobile apps may serve as an additional ordering channel that enhances the QSR experience, they’ll never supplant self-order kiosks (despite predictions from app designers). Although there may be some among us who gravitate to mobile apps, there are too many restaurant choices and not enough space on our devices to hold apps for each one. And anyway, who wants to go through the hassle of downloading an app to place an order when there’s a self-order kiosk already available? Instead, it’s likely that both channels will thrive.

However, with many of these technologies built on self-order kiosks, their success will hinge on the quality of those kiosks. Olea’s offering in the self-order kiosk arena, for example, is its sleek and modern Austin Freestanding Kiosk. Olea also performed custom kiosk work and purpose-built the kiosks Appetize is using to achieve its dramatic results.

The Austin works in any environment and continues Olea’s mission to provide better kiosks through intelligent design. To maintain the flexible configuration capability, the Austin is engineered to accommodate an optional 15″ or 22″ All-in-One computer in either portrait or landscape as well as an EMV-approved Card Reader & Pin Pad and POS-style receipt printer.

The wide array of transactional components housed in this sleek, feature-packed kiosk makes it one of the most powerful retail solutions available on the market. Its compact footprint and rugged security complement a variety of environments for companies that seek to improve ROI and user interaction in small spaces or high traffic areas.

The adoption of new technologies is setting the stage for exciting (and profitable) times in the QSR space. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help! Feel free to call us at 800.927.8063 or email us at info@olea.com.

Contact Olea Kiosks today at 800.927.8063 for more information

Article reprinted from Olea.com

Ticket Kiosk FAQ – Olea Kiosks Information

Republished with permission from Olea Kiosks website

Ticketing Kiosk

Improving ROI

austin webpTicketing Kiosks are not new to the industry of self-service applications as most major transportation companies and entertainment ticket distributors already utilize this solution in one form or another. Most of the ROI benefits of ticketing kiosks come in measurable increments, while others are subtle benefits that still ultimately impact a company’s bottom line.

Save on Employee Overhead Costs

One of the major benefits of the self-service ticket kiosk is the overall reduction in cost per transaction. This is primarily due to the reduction in costs related to employees since less staff is needed.

Improving Customer Satisfaction

Ticket Kiosks also help improve customer satisfaction by making transactions faster and more convenient. Monetary transactions are simplified as ticketing kiosks accept various payment methods including credit cards and cash. This also significantly reduces the time commitment for each transaction making it more efficient while preventing long congested lines.

Improve Access to Your Services

Installing ticketing kiosks on off-site locations can increase revenue by offering more distribution locations for customers to visit. This also contributes to lower infrastructure costs by making these transactions automated. In addition, ticketing kiosks allow owners to easily and effectively communicate with their customer base through well-constructed applications. These provide the ability to update content on special promotions, up-sell items and introduce new product or service offerings. Having the ability to communicate with customers increases revenue and the amount of sale per transaction.

Improve Efficiency

Ticket Kiosks also offer the security of knowing that there is no room for human error. The applications are completely accurate and eliminate the possibility of mistakes or miscalculations.

outdoor ticket kiosk
Outdoor kiosks for ticketing by the Seattle

Appetize POS Boosts Consumer Spend, Driving Demand for Self-Serve Kiosk

Press release from BusinessWire May 09, 2019

Self-Service Kiosks Drive Up to 40% Lift on Orders; Company Brings on New Customers AT&T Center, LSU, Museums

PLAYA VISTA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Appetize, the modern Point of Sale (POS) and enterprise management platform, today announced strong results from its self-service kiosk technology seeing up to 40% increase in order size across its customer base. Appetize is at the forefront of a growing industry shift toward self-service kiosks and has recently expanded its kiosk reach with new customers Louisiana State University (LSU), AT&T Center, home of the San Antonio Spurs, and SSA (Service Systems Associates), foodservice provider for the Cincinnati Museum Center and other attractions.

Self-Service Kiosks from @appetizepos Deliver Up to 40% Lift in Orders. Announces New Customers @Attcenter, @lsu and more

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Appetize’s Interact self-service platform offers embedded upsell functionality and data shows that consumers are 47% more likely to add an item on a kiosk than when asked to do so by a cashier. The company is seeing consistent results from kiosks across multiple industries, including attractions, education campuses, restaurants, and sports and entertainment facilities.

Some recent data shows customers are experiencing both an increase in order size and items per order, including:

  • AT&T Center selected Appetize to be its point of sale platform arena-wide in 2018; in 2019, it deployed self-service kiosks and has seen an 18% increase in average order size.
  • SSA (Service Systems Associates), a foodservice provider for leading cultural attractions, deployed Appetize self-service kiosks at Cincinnati Museum Center and saw a 40% adoption rate in less than six months and a 20% increase in average order size.
  • LSU deployed Appetize self-service kiosks in its arena and has seen a 16% increase in average order size and 25% more items per check at kiosks compared to terminals at point of sale counters.

“We have been working with Appetize since 2017 and recently deployed kiosks to enhance our food service and offer a more convenient and frictionless experience for our students and guests,” said Matthew LaBorde, Assistant AD from LSU. “Appetize made it extremely easy for us to deploy a self-service platform and shift toward the future of ordering at athletic events.”

“Our customers are focused on two things: guest experience and financial performance. The Appetize Interact platform offers a modern and dynamic digital experience for guests while driving increased share of wallet for the business,” said Max Roper, Co-founder and CEO at Appetize. “In the past six months, over 45% of our deployments have included self-service kiosks, and we expect this trend to continue as businesses require more automation and consumers desire a more frictionless experience.”

Designed to enhance the guest experience and increase staff productivity, Appetize’s cloud-based self-service platform, Interact, gives businesses an intuitive checkout interface with custom menu ordering and branding for both Quick Serve and Retail environments. The platform also includes a back of house management suite, real-time connectivity for fulfillment and cashless payment experience, and more.

About Appetize

Appetize is a modern Point of Sale, inventory and analytics platform transforming how enterprises manage and process guest transactions. With an omni-channel approach, Appetize makes front of house transactions more intuitive through fixed, self-serve and handheld form factors, while providing robust kitchen and back office tools. Appetize is trusted by some of the largest and highest volume businesses in the world, including sports and entertainment properties, education campuses, theme parks, travel and leisure sites, and national chain brands. For more information, please visit getappetize.com.

Appetize Contacts

Kathryn Kelly

Gateway Unveiling ‘Next Generation’ Kiosk Interface and New Reporting Solution at IAAPA Attractions Expo – Gateway Ticketing Systems

Next Generation Ticketing Interface for KioskNext Generation Ticketing Interface for Kiosk

Gateway Ticketing Systems will be exhibiting at IAAPA Attractions Expo for the 25th consecutive year, Nov. 13-17, 2017, in Orlando.

Source: www.gatewayticketing.com

Located at Booth #4854, the Gateway Ticketing Systems team will give booth visitors a sneak peek at its ‘next generation’ kiosk interface currently in development as well as showcase some of its recently released solutions including:

 

Reporting Plus | Powered by Galaxy – Any Data, Anytime, Anywhere
This new reporting solution captures all transactional data from an attraction’s Galaxy® point-of-sale, membership and admission control software. From there, customers can access a suite of standard reports on both traditional and mobile devices, extract reports and data in a wide range of formats, automate report delivery and easily develop custom reports.

CRM Plus | Powered by Galaxy – 360-Degree Customer View with One Solution
This powerful customer relationship management tool integrates seamlessly with our Galaxy® point-of-sale software. CRM Plus enables attractions to conduct segmentation analysis and trigger real-time personalized communications to deepen relationships with its guests.

Galaxy Connect – 2016 IAAPA Brass Ring Best New Product Award – 2nd Place for Technology Applied to Amusements: Facilities
This cloud-based platform enables attractions and online travel agencies to easily and securely sell live tickets, even for capacity-managed events. Galaxy Connect eliminates the need for vouchers, saving hours of tedious back-office work. Booth visitors will learn how the Galaxy Connect community has grown, adding some of the world’s largest online travel agencies to the platform.

CyberSecurity Kiosks Help Companies

Reprinted from Olea Kiosks

Portable media remains one of the key ways hackers infect a company’s network

Anyone who’s ever dropped of their child at a daycare is familiar with the scenario. If one child has a virus, it’s only a matter of time until all the other kids pick it up as well.

It’s the same with digital storage devices. Introducing USB drives, media cards or data disks into company computers can be just as risky as having your child spend the day with a sick kid.

Sure, it’s likely there’s no bad intent. It may simply be to copy a few files to work on over the weekend, or just to bring some favorite tunes into the office to help make the day more enjoyable. But portable drives are like those sick kids at the daycare.  The worst-case scenario involves the spread of a nasty virus that can end up costing a parent (or a company) thousands of dollars to fight.

The bigger the corporation, the greater the risk. In addition to a greater number of employees who may use portable drives, larger corporations are likely to use contractors to perform maintenance on equipment that may provide an access point to internal networks.

Think the risk is overblown? A recent story on ZDNet detailed how a third-party worker inserted a USB drive into a computer on a cargo ship, inadvertently planting a virus in the ship’s administrative systems. The systems of another cargo ship were infected for more than two years, thanks to a virus that was introduced to its power management systems via a USB drive used in a software update. Luckily, nether incident affected the ships while they were at sea.

In another story that would be laughable if it wasn’t true, Taiwan’s Criminal Investigation Bureau handed out 250 USB drives to winners of a quiz on cybersecurity. The bonus? At least 54 of the drives were infected by a virus that had made its way from the computer of an employee of the hardware manufacturer.

Olea California Cyber-Security Malware Scanning Kiosk

And in yet another situation, reported on KrebsOnSecurity.com, the American Dental Association admitted that it may have inadvertently mailed malware-laced USB drives to thousands of dental offices around the country.

The drives contained information about updated codes that dental offices use to track procedures for billing and insurance purposes. Unfortunately, the drives also contained a program that attempted tries to open a Web page used by hackers to infect visitors with malware, ultimately giving criminals full control of the infected Windows computer. The ADA told Krebs the drives were manufactured in China by a subcontractor of one of its vendor, and that about 37,000 of the devices had been sent to dental offices.

With the risks involved in using portable drives, what can a company do to protect itself?

Stop problems at the front door

Organizations in a variety of industries require secure networks that serve critical infrastructure, mission critical processes, or are otherwise vital to business operations. Critical networks monitor and control physical equipment and processes, often found in industries that manage critical infrastructure, such as energy, oil & gas, water and utilities, but also in manufacturing, pharmaceuticals and government defense networks. Critical networks are also found in air and road traffic control, shipping systems, as well as other industries.

These networks are often targeted by professional hackers, and in some cases even by government supported actors. These sophisticated hackers frequently use zero-day attacks which cannot be detected by traditional signature-based security tools. In addition, malware continues to grow both in volume and in complexity, with new variants increasingly evading even more advanced security systems such as malware sandboxes. In 2018, we saw Shamoon malware used to attack energy facilities around the globe and the Triton cyber attackshut down a number of industrial facilities.

To guard against outside attacks, networks are often air-gapped or somehow isolated from the rest of the organization’s infrastructure.

One way to ensure network security, of course, is to completely ban the use of outside drives with company equipment. Unfortunately, in many situations that’s just not practical. For example, operating systems and software need to be patched and critical system logs need to be collected. It may also be an outside firm making an on-site sales pitch using a presentation brought in on a CD or flash drive, or it could be an employee using their personal device to transfer files to work on over the weekend. It could be a doctor at the local hospital copying X-ray images to take back to their office.

And chances are that most of us have three or four flash drives sitting on their desk, purchased at the local drugstore, picked up as swag at an industry trade show or even found lying near a computer in a conference room. If we needed on in a hurry, we’d likely grab one of those without giving it a second thought.

Anyway, who wants to work in a cubicle farm where bringing in some Taylor Swift to pass the time is against the rules?

Securing the network against threats

With that in mind, how does the organization create a data transfer process to securely move files in and out of the critical network without exposing it to a risk of infection or the loss of sensitive information?

A more sensible way to address network security might be to allow the use of portable drives, but insist those drives be scanned before being used at the office. It’s sort of like signing up for daycare services but getting a full medical workup on all the other kids before trusting them with your own child.

Enter the Cybersecurity kiosk

One tool for accomplishing such a task is the California Cyber Security Kiosk, manufactured by Olea Kiosk. Olea created the California to help companies safeguard their infrastructure from malware threats on removable devices brought in by employees, contractors, vendors and others.

The California safeguards critical networks by providing the ability to detect malware, as well as control and sanitize file contents before entering or leaving a secure network. The kiosk can be deployed at strategic locations throughout your organization where employees or guests may be entering with USB drives or other portable media that could contain malicious files. A notice that portable drives need to be scanned before being brought on site can be included in employee training materials, while receptionists or other greeters can direct contractors or third-party vendors to scan any drive they plan to use while at work.

Using OPSWAT’s Metascan multi-scanning technology, Olea’s kiosk can scan USB drives, Blu-ray/CDs/DVDs, and other portable media using up to 30 fully-licensed antivirus engines. The kiosk offers an array of features including a 15-in-1 media reader, a receipt printer, a robust Dell CPU, two external USB ports and a UPS battery device that continues power during an electrical brownout.

The kiosk’s stylish design allows it to provide functionality while at the same time enhancing the look of employee entrances or office lobbies.

Nearly every day brings news of a data breach, ransomware attack or other virus issue that brings a company to its knees, and those threats continue to grow. The 2018 Global Threat Report indicates that more than 7 in 10 of all organizations in the US were affected by a data breach in some way over the past few years. Other studies peg the cost of a data breach at an average of $3.62 million.

Don’t be one of that 70 percent. If you need protection from the cybersecurity risks of using portable media, Olea Kiosks stands ready to help!

Contact Olea Kiosks today at 800.927.8063 for more information

 

Related Information

Gaming Kiosk and Player Loyalty Kiosk – How kiosks are revolutionizing gaming

Originally published on GGB March 22, 2019.  By 

Excerpt:

Touch screen, touch points.

Kiosks sport increased influence in the gaming world. From hotel check-ins to food ordering, cash dispensing and now sports betting, these unofficial goodwill ambassadors flaunt new stature. Perhaps no other device mingles with so many revenue areas. Kiosks also have an envied parallel use in other industries: at airports, at doctor’s offices, in supermarkets. Casino patrons already embrace this technology.

What an ascent. The sector once primarily dealt funds the way gas stations replenish a car’s tank. Then its role spread to check-cashing, wayfinding, messaging and jackpot pay. Kiosks became freestanding, wall-mounted, hand-held forms of customer service, used on walls, in corners, in lobbies, or near the gaming action.

A look around the industry reveals their new creative deployment. Some extend kiosk features to a phone. Others lessen the costly check-in and check-out logjam. Food courts increasingly use them to speed delivery methods.

Kiosks also become a flashpoint in the proliferation of sports betting.


Express Train

rGuest Express Kiosk

Sometimes, fast and steady wins the race.

Kiosks reducing check-in times are invaluable, particularly to customers enduring a cross-country flight to gamble. A check-in of 30 minutes to an hour at the end of a 12-hour cross-country travel day creates a risky first impression to the gambler. A system bypassing that logjam produces a strong one.

More properties have reduced overhead and enhanced customer satisfaction by providing a kiosk.

Agilysys, the Alpharetta, Georgia-based global provider of next-generation hospitality software solutions and services, maintains an aggressive presence in the kiosk space. One of its latest introductions is rGuest Express Kiosk, designed to expedite guest service with self-service kiosk check-in, room key encoding, check-out and folios via email.

Company officials say rGuest Kiosk expedites guest service operations by enabling them to check in, encode a room key, check out and email a folio—all without having to wait in line at the front desk. The rGuest Express Kiosk is a self-service solution that integrates with both Agilysys Visual One PMS and Agilysys Lodging Management System.

  • The rGuest Express Kiosk allows guests to obtain an email copy of their folios at any time during their stay, without checking out.
  • Guests can also request that folio receipts be emailed or mailed to an address based on information captured in Visual One or LMS. Special messages, vouchers and printed instructions can be provided to guests based on management-defined criteria.
  • By automating check-in and check-out, employees concentrate on providing the guest services that help create a lasting impression.
  • Guests can also reprint room keys at any time during their stay.

Agilysys has been a leader in hospitality software for more than 40 years and continually enhances its product lineup.

In 2017, Agilysys unveiled enhancements to rGuestBuy, its groundbreaking self-service kiosk POS solution that extends point-of-sale reach, improves guest service and reduces staff demand, plus enhancements for Café workflows and a new Grab N Go guest experience.

Company officials cite industry reports indicating that 63 percent of resort guests prefer kiosks as their paying vehicle for buying food.

Link to Agilysis


Kiosk Competition

Olea Monte Carlo kiosk

Olea Kiosks, based outside of Los Angeles, is a kiosk powerhouse. Its clients include Boomtown, Caesars, Chickasaw Nation, Hard Rock, Tropicana and Empire Casino/Yonkers Raceway, among others. The company has deployed hundreds of kiosks in the gaming sector for player loyalty, and works with all software partners including Scientific Games, Agilysys and IGT properties, according to Craig Keefner, its manager of kiosks.

(Olea also is a founding board member of the Kiosk Manufacturer Association and has multiple members in the Kiosk Hall of Fame.)

From a sector viewpoint, Keefner cites a bullish Frost & Sullivan report on self-service kiosk projected revenue. It climbs dependably from 2014 results through 2022 in all major worldwide regions. This analysis reflects a trend the industry covets: a steadily improving niche, especially one that lowers labor costs.

Olea forecasts robust demand in the player-loyalty realm and growth potential in the hotel check-in, food/buffet ordering kiosks and sports betting areas.

“According to a May 2017 Oxford Economics Report, legalized sports betting is projected to generate $8.4 billion in new tax revenues, create more than 200,000 new jobs and add over $22 billion to the (U.S.) GDP,” he says. “The market has an inherent ‘burst cycle’ to it with the deadline on bets. You want to convert all those would-be bettors, and you have a limited time to do it. Mobile betting terminals that can be deployed at those times would help.”

What would that look like?

“Casinos will need to be well-prepared for the influx of new customers that will be flocking to their venues in hopes of placing their first legal sports bet,” he indicates. “As a result, many casinos are finding that sports betting kiosks provide the needed automated self-service solution to handle a higher volume of sports wagers without requiring the need for additional customer service staff.”

Keefner ties projected food-service demand to rising wages and focus on more healthful and costly menu items. “Whether deployed inside or at the drive-through, our units will speed orders and improve accuracy, all the while letting operators reassign staff to more critical roles,” he says.

All of this will keep the company busy. Olea designs and builds self-service terminals. Its 2019 fleet includes a line of cash/currency transactional “standard” units. Olea has been building for the OEM channel up to now, and has begun releasing those units as standard models.

“We make both player loyalty and the hotel check-in/self-order kiosks used in non-gaming mode,” Keefner says. “Generating player loyalty cards on the spot instantly is the main function. Our units can verify credentials such as a driver’s license and print ticket stock. Dual touch-screen displays are 22 inches, and accommodate wide-screen format for the software (16:9 aspect ratio as compared to older 5:4 aspect).

There is an attractor screen to entice users and identify the purpose for the machine as well as programmable LEDs to add the Vegas or sizzle visual experience. Our Monte Carlo is our flagship unit.”

The product visually stimulates with two large displays and brilliant LED lighting. Keefner says kioskmarketplace.com named it the most innovative gaming kiosk for 2017.

Read the full article

Related Reading

For more information contact us

Vista Cinema and Veezi Approve Olea for Self-Service Ticketing Kiosks

March 25, 2019

Los Angeles, Calif. March 25, 2019 – Vista Entertainment Solutions Ltd (‘Vista Cinema’), the leading provider of cinema management software for global cinema exhibition, and Veezi, Vista’s SaaS cinema management solution for Independent Cinemas, have approved Olea Kiosks (‘Olea’), to support Vista with self-service kiosk hardware. Since May 2018 Vista has been deploying Olea kiosks bundled with Vista’s industry-best kiosk software solution as a prelude to this announcement timed for CinemaCon 2019.

Throughout 2018 Vista assessed Olea on behalf of its customers. This included testing the durability of the hardware, its ability to integrate with Vista’s platform, and accommodate the varying needs of theatre sizes. During this time Olea won the 2019 Frost & Sullivan Customer Value Leadership Award, which ranks industry participants by value in terms of price, product performance, service, and brand loyalty.

Vista has begun offering several models from Olea to make kiosk deployments easier for its customers. All models can be used for Ticketing and Food & Beverage purchases with the Vista Kiosk software application. Each Kiosk model can be ordered in different colors, screen sizes, and with custom branding. A mix of 15” to 55” screen sizes are available on varying models suitable for countertop, wall mount, or freestanding applications. All kiosks are designed to be ADA Compliant and to UL standards. The line-up also includes Olea’s industry-leading outdoor kiosk.

Vista Kiosk – Vista’s flagship kiosk software product, allows users to order Food and Beverage items, as well as purchase tickets. The user can decide at the time of ordering to pick up their food at the counter or have it delivered directly to their seat.

When the kiosk is dormant, rolling promotions of the exhibitor’s choice may be displayed. The kiosks also support cross-site sales; if Location A is sold out, rather than reverting to a competitor, users can purchase tickets for other locations from the same (Location A) kiosk.

The customers of today demand convenience, and an omnichannel approach to interacting with them is key to ensure they come back. Kiosks not only provide a comfortable way for users to make their preferred purchases, their usage is known to increase average transaction levels. Kiosks also allow theatres to redistribute their staff to enable more mobility around the theatre and carry out more impactful tasks.

Tess Manchester, President, Vista USA based in Los Angeles, is delighted at the successful outcome of the 2018 collaboration between Vista Cinema and Olea. “To discover a hardware vendor with the functional and design standards of Olea – not to mention the enormous respect they obviously have for their cinema exhibition customers – provides an additional avenue for Vista Cinema to add value to those same customers. Everyone wins – and in this instance – especially the moviegoer.”

Visit Olea Kiosks at booth 2805A and Vista Group at booth 513F at CinemaCon 2019 to experience a live demo of the Vista Kiosk and Olea combination.

Related Articles:

Contact Olea Kiosks today at 800.927.8063 for more information

Attracting Attention: 8 Ways to Increase Kiosk Usage

Originally published on LinkedIn by Craig A. Keefner


Craig Allen Keefner
Manager at Olea Kiosks Inc.

A self-service kiosk isn’t a “set it and forget it” proposition. Getting customers to use that kiosk takes a bit of effort.

When a company incorporates a self-service kiosk into its operations, one of the key challenges it faces is how to encourage people to use that kiosk.

In a restaurant, the more people use a self-order kiosk, the more time staff will have to deliver personalized service. In a retail operation, merchandise orders placed via an in-store kiosk add to the bottom line without the costs associated with keeping that merchandise in stock.

For bill pay kiosks and similar devices located in grocery stores or other third-party locations, attracting users to conduct their transactions at the kiosk versus the customer service counter leads to higher revenue for the kiosk deployer. In each of these cases, more people using the kiosk means a quicker return on investment, higher transaction averages and ultimately, more satisfied customers.

But self-service success isn’t as simple as setting up a kiosk and waiting for the money to roll in. Here are a few things deployers can do to make customers comfortable with their kiosk project:

Deploy multiple kiosks – One of the best drivers of kiosk usage is placing two units instead of one. Psychologically, it either gives users permission to use the devices or it puts them in an “if they can, I can” position.

Place signage nearby – Even a simple sign by the door saying “try our new self-order kiosks” can help drive traffic. Additional signage near the kiosk with a phrase along the line of “Just touch the screen to begin” will prompt some customers to take the plunge.

Employ a kiosk “concierge” – This can be particularly helpful with a new kiosk deploymentHaving an employee near the kiosk ready to walk customers through the transaction process can help them overcome any trepidation they may have. In addition, seeing people make use of the kiosk can lead others to want to get in on the action.

Light it up – A string of LED lights or a digital display mounted above the kiosk can grab attention. Even something as simple as a wall-mounted LCD display will help boost traffic. That can be particularly important in a situation where the kiosk is in a third-party location such as a convenience or grocery store and is in competition with other transaction channels.

Make use of color – Some customers may be apprehensive about using your kiosk. Including instructions on the kiosk enclosure and/or having the touchscreen revert to a screensaver that says something along the lines of “Touch here to begin” when not in use may encourage users to take that first step.

Create an accompanying loyalty program – A loyalty program for kiosk users or kiosk-only promos can reward customers for using the deviceA Kiosk Combo in a restaurant or a kiosk-only coupon in a retail store can be a great incentive, helping to increase usage.

Place it front and center – It should go without saying, but we’ll say it anyway. If you want to achieve all the benefits a self-service kiosk has to offer, make it the centerpiece of your operation. Don’t put it in the corner; place it in such a way that customers can’t help but see it as they walk through the door.

Talk it up – Whether you are using your kiosk for self-ordering in a restaurant, as an endless aisle device or for self-checkout applications, make it a part of your marketing efforts. Mention it on social media and spotlight it in advertising circulars. Getting customers interested in the device will lead them to use it.

As a parting thought, one of the best ways to ensure customers make use of your self-service kiosk is by educating employees about the benefits it will offer and how it will make their jobs easier. Employee-buy-in will go a long way towards making the project a success.

At the end of the day, the best way to ensure the kiosk you choose provides maximum benefits is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who can recommend the best options. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

Call 800.927.8063 for more information.

800.927.8063

800.927.8063

Self-Service Kiosk Cleanliness – Considerations Before and After Deployment

Self-Service Kiosk CleanlinessSelf-Service Kiosk Cleanliness

Left unattended, interactive kiosks can get dirty, inadvertently turning off potential users. Read about best practices for keeping a kiosk clean.

Source: www.olea.com

One takeaway — A best practice example would be to adopt the same cleaning schedule as your customer counter.  In the morning wipe the kiosk touchscreen with something like Easy Screen and ideally at the end of business wipe it again.  Every day. Also any contact points, and while you are at it, do your mobile phone too!

Outdoor Kiosk At Large – Pics of Space Needle & Drive thru units by Olea

Kiosk Pictures

Here are a couple of pics of units in the field by Olea.

Outdoor kiosk by Olea
Olea Drive Thru Kiosk – these have been deploying since Sept 2014

 


 

Here is the unit just deployed at Space Needle

Space Needle outdoor kiosks by Olea
Space Needle kiosks by Olea

 
Related Info

QSR Kiosks Are the Next Big Thing in Fast Food

AMD Global Telemedicine Announces Strategic Partnership with Olea Kiosks

AMD Global Telemedicine Partnership with Olea Kiosks

Two long-standing healthcare vendors join forces to deliver an integrated telehealth kiosk solution.

AMD Telemedicine Olea Kiosks
The future of telehealth depends on our ability to make it as convenient and seamless as possible to deliver healthcare on-demand, and healthcare kiosks do just that

AMD Global Telemedicine Inc. (AMD), the pioneer of clinical Telemedicine Encounter Management Solutions (TEMS) ®, and Olea Kiosks Inc, the premier global designer and manufacturer of self-service kiosks, announce a partnership to deliver customized kiosks for telehealth applications.

The two long-standing healthcare vendors have combined their engineering and technology resources to offer a solution that addresses increasing demands for areas such as chronic disease management, healthcare screening, wellness programs and occupational health clinics. The new customizable telemedicine kiosk solution provides healthcare organizations with numerous options for self check-in, patient assessment, video conferencing, digitization of medical records, and payment.

“The future of telehealth depends on our ability to make it as convenient and seamless as possible to deliver healthcare on-demand, and healthcare kiosks do just that,” commented Eric Bacon, President of AMD Global Telemedicine. “The partnership we have formed with Olea Kiosks elevates our solutions offering to the next level,” added Bacon.

“With the cost of many technologies coming down and the broader acceptance of Self-Service, the idea of self-service healthcare has really taken off,” commented Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks. “We share a common commitment and passion for delivering customized healthcare solutions and tailored program design”.

By partnering, AMD has combined their twenty-six years telemedicine experience with Olea Kiosks’ 42 years designing and building kiosks, to design completely customizable kiosks that fit specific healthcare requirements and price points. For more information on the customized telehealth kiosk solutions, visit http://www.amdtelemedicine.com

About AMD Global Telemedicine, Inc. 
AMD Global Telemedicine, Inc. (AMD) is the pioneer of Telemedicine Encounter Management Solutions (TEMS)® to over 9,000 patient end-points in more than 98 countries. Since 1991, AMD has led the development of clinical telemedicine as a way of bringing quality medical care to rural and underdeveloped areas around the world. AMD provides personalized telemedicine solutions pairing our telemedicine encounter management software technology with specialized medical devices and video communication technologies, in order to connect a patient with a remote clinical healthcare provider. For more information on AMD Global Telemedicine, visit http://www.amdtelemedicine.com.

About Olea Kiosks, Inc. 
Olea Kiosks, Inc. is a Los Angeles-based design, manufacturing and services company providing kiosks, self-

service terminals, and interactive digital signage for a wide range of markets, including QSR self-order kiosks, fast casual dining, healthcare, gaming casinos, loyalty kiosk and payment kiosk services. In business for more than 40 years, the company builds “better kiosks through intelligent design” and serves clients across the globe. Olea Kiosks, Inc. 800.927.8063 or by email at info(at)olea(dot)com.

Best Practice – Are All Touchscreens Created Equal?

Are All Touchscreens Created Equal?

Reprinted from TheLab by Olea

Interactive touchscreens come in several varieties. Here’s a quick overview of the types and the applications to which each is best suited.

Although interactive touchscreens have been around in one form or another since the late 1970s, over the past 10 years or so they’ve become an integral part of our lives.

In fact, thanks to the iPhone, tablet computers and similar devices, we’ve become accustomed to the idea that we should be able to touch the screens we see and get a reaction. Interactive touchscreens are a central feature of devices ranging from ATMs to wayfinding kiosks to the photo kiosks common in drugstores around the country.

A Research and Markets study valued the size of the interactive display market at $9.9 billion in 2015, with that market estimated to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 15.5 percent over the next five years, reaching $26.9 billion by 2022.

Interactive displays include a variety of technologies, though, and not every technology is suited to every application.

Stacking them up

According to the industry trade publication Control Design, there are five main types of touchscreens: resistive touch, infrared touch, surface capacitive, surface acoustical wave and projected capacitive. Each has its advantages, disadvantages and applications for which it is best suited.

A resistive touchscreen is made up of several thin layers, including two electrically resistive layers facing each other with a thin gap between. When the top layer is touched, the two layers connect and the screen detects the position of that touch.

“Resistive touch is a very old technology that some companies still offer as their go-to,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“It works great in places with dust and grease, such as fast food restaurants, and its low price point can make it attractive for those with a limited budget,” Olea said. “I personally don’t care for it because it makes the image on the screen appear hazy and it wears out over time.”

In addition, resistive-touch screens are unable to perform the multitouch functions that are becoming increasingly popular.

For very large displays, infrared touch is the most common application. Instead of a sandwich of screens, infrared touchscreens use IR emitters and receivers to create an invisible grid of beams across the display surface. When an object such as a finger interrupts the grid, sensors on the display are able to locate the exact point.

Advantages of infrared touch are excellent image quality and a long life, and they work great for gesture-based applications. In addition, scratches on the screen itself won’t affect functionality. In many cases, touch capability can be added to a display through the use of a third-party overlay placed on the existing screen.

On the downside, infrared touchscreens are susceptible to accidental activation and malfunctions due to dirt or grease buildup. They’re also not suited to outdoor applications. In addition, while adding an overlay is a relatively quick way to convert a large display into a touchscreen, extra care must be taken in mounting that overlay to ensure touches match the image displayed on the screen.

Surface capacitive screens have a connective coating applied to the front surface and a small voltage is applied to each corner. Touching the screen creates a voltage drop, with sensors on the screen using that drop to pinpoint the location of that touch. Advantages of surface capacitive technology include low cost and a resistance to environmental factors, while disadvantages include an inability to withstand heavy use and a lack of multitouch capability. Those screens are also limited to finger touches; the technology won’t work if the user is wearing gloves. DVD rental company Redbox uses surface capacitive screens in their kiosks.

The promise of multitouch

Other types of touchscreen tech offer the potential of more complicated functions thanks to their ability to sense several touches at the same time. Multitouch applications might include functions performed with two or more fingers, such as pinching or zooming of images. Larger displays might allow for interaction using two hands or even two users.

Surface acoustic wave or SAW displays use piezoelectric transducers and receivers along the sides of the screen to create a grid of invisible ultrasonic waves on the surface. A portion of the wave is absorbed when the screen is touched, with that disruption tracked to locate the touch point.

“We tend to lead with surface acoustic wave,” Olea said.

“The transparency of the glass on an SAW panel is pretty good and the touch tends to be very stable and not require frequent calibration,” he said. “On the other hand, it doesn’t work well outdoors or anywhere there is grease or high amounts of dust, such as near parking lots, in warehouses things like that. Also, you can do 2-point touch on SAW although pinching, zooming, and applications such as on-screen signatures don’t work very well.”

Milan Digital Kiosk - Grand Canal Shoppes

Last on the list of dominant touch technologies is projected capacitive technology. PCAP is a relative of capacitive touch, with the key difference being that they can be used with a stylus or a gloved finger. Projected capacitive touchscreens are built by layering a matrix of rows and columns of conductive material on sheets of glass. Voltage applied to the matrix creates a uniform electrostatic field, which is distorted when a conductive object comes into contact with the screen. That distortion serves to pinpoint the touch.

Projected capacitive and its cousin surface capacitive are relatively new technologies, similar to what’s in a smartphone. Both offer opportunities not possible with resistive and infrared touch screens.

“Capacitive technology is born and bred for multi-touch,” Olea said. “And because the touch technology is embedded in the glass it offers superior resistance to wear, vandalism and gives you a very clear, bright screen.”

Olea uses projected capacitive technology in all of its outdoor kiosk products.

“Projected capacitive screens are still fairly expensive compared with other types of touchscreens, mostly because the technology is new and there isn’t a ton of high-quality manufacturers out there making them,” Olea said. “Metal can also interfere with the function of the PCAP technology, so the integrator or kiosk designer should know what they are doing to ensure the product works as advertised.”

The final determination

Ultimately, the type of touchscreen a deployer chooses to incorporate into their application will be determined by factors including the deployer’s budget, the environment in which the device will be placed, the function the device will perform and the deployer’s plans for any future applications.

Order entry screens in the kitchens of a small fast-food restaurant chains would obviously call for resistive touch technology, for example, while a 72-inch display in a hotel lobby or shopping mall would call for infrared touch. An “endless aisle” or catalogue lookup kiosk where a shopper may want to enlarge an image of a particular product might work fine with a surface acoustic wave or surface capacitive screen, while wayfinding kiosks on a college campus or city street would likely call for projected capacitive technology.

Perhaps the deployer has plans to implement more advanced functions down the road, and wants to future-proof their investment. In that case, they may need to choose between a surface capacitive or projective capacitive screen.

At the end of the day, the best way to choose a touchscreen best suited to the application for which it will be used is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.