Tag Archives: retail

NRF Forrester “State of Retail 2019” report

Excerpt from new report by NRF and Forrester covering Retail in 2019
NRF Research

The State of Retailing Online 2019

Developed in partnership with Forrester Research, the annual State of Retailing Online report provides an overview of metrics from the previous year as well as retailers’ key priorities, investments and challenges for this year. For the first time, the report also details retailers’ challenges and strategies surrounding personalization.

Top Findings from the SORO report

NRF Forrester Retail 2019 Report

Omnichannel Still Work in Progress – Mobile Dominating

 

NRF Forrester Retail 2019 Report

Social Marketing Surpassing Search?

NRF Forrester Retail 2019 Report

test

Retailers Report Mixed Performance In Stores And Online

“The State Of Retailing Online” is an annual survey conducted by the National Retail Federation (NRF). The survey examines retailer and digital business professional attitudes and focus areas for critical digital commerce issues. Some notable additions to this year’s survey are several questions related to
omnichannel fulfillment and personalization. We conducted the survey for the 2019 study in Q4 2018 and received 69 complete and partial responses from retailers. Respondents in this annual survey were (see Figure 1):

› › Split between pure plays and store-based merchants. Fifty-five percent of survey respondents were employees of traditional brick-and-mortar retailers with web divisions or branded manufacturers with largely wholesale businesses. Another 45% were pure plays or online retailers.

› › Large retailers. Most of the survey respondents were employees of relatively large retail companies. Sixty six percent of respondents were at companies that generate more than $500 million in revenue annually, and 43% of the respondents’ companies make over $1 billion in revenue.

› › Senior executives with marketing or eCommerce. Fifty-nine percent of respondents were at the VP level or above in their organization. Another 23% described themselves as C-suite leaders. Additionally, 48% of respondents were part of their company’s eCommerce or marketing teams (see Figure 2).

nrf forrester retail report 2019
Click to expand

 

 

Retail Marketing Psychology – Frank Mayer

The Psychology Behind Retail Marketing

Editors note – originally published on the Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. blog.  Link to article

 Katie Kochelek February 8, 2019

If you’re anything like me, you’ve visited that magical, wholesale warehouse Costco with good intentions to pick up the necessities – paper towels, cheese, yogurt, the like.

Fast forward an hour and you’re now walking out with an economy size bag of Tootsie Roll pops, a jug of raw honey, and a party-size serving of chicken salad for your young family of four.

Whoa.  What just happened? Retail Psychology.jpg

We’ve all seen the silly memes about Costco, Target, and the other big box stores, gently teasing the point that there’s no way to shop these retailers without deviating from your list.

But it turns out there’s a lot of psychology behind encouraging you to go rogue during your shopping trip, and below we detail a few of the insider tricks retailers use to inspire the impulse buy.

The Science of Discovery

Much has been written about Costco’s “treasure hunt” approach to in-store merchandising, a strategy that involves constantly shuffling staple items to different locations in the store.  The science behind this is simple.  Rearranging items forces shoppers to walk by tempting triggers in the search for their usual goods.

Ever notice the lack of signage above the aisles at Costco, too?  Chalk that up as another element of the treasure hunt, designed to encourage exploration.

But wait a second.  Every article written about retail in the past few years has the word “frictionless” in it.  Why is Costco so popular, consistently scoring high on the American Customer Satisfaction Index, if it’s constantly making shoppers jump through hoops to find their favorite products?

It boils down to science.

When humans discover unexpected items or experience something new, our brain releases the same chemicals associated with joy and love.  So, in essence, stumbling upon the row of smart lighting solutions on my way to buy diapers makes me feel happy because my brain is programmed that way.  And the fact that Costco changes up their endcap displays in addition to rotating store merchandise means I’m always entering the store subconsciously anticipating the thrill of discovery.

FOMO and the Impulse Buy

The fear of missing out, or more commonly referred to as FOMO, is another hardwired human trait that brands and retailers use to their advantage.

In the book “The New Rules of Retail: Competing in the World’s Toughest Marketplace” by Robin Lewis and Michael Dart, the authors write, “Neuroscientists have proven that the anticipation of rewards – or the potential of not getting what you want – will produce dopamine, which actively drives behavior.”

They go on to use fast fashion retailer Zara as an example of a business model that draws shoppers to its stores more often than the average retailer.  Why?  Because Zara releases new clothing lines constantly.

As Lewis and Dart state, “Customers visit Zara seventeen times per year, compared to only three or four times for traditional retailers, because they are afraid of missing something new and exciting.  The connection is so strong that customers are compelled to buy in fear of the item’s being bought by someone else.”

It’s why marketing messages like “Act now!” and “Hurry! While supplies last!” trigger our knee-jerk decisions.  We appease the FOMO anxiety and release that good-feeling dopamine when we keep from missing out.

Tell Me About Yourself

Marketers have become hip to how millennials, now the largest consumer demographic, want to interact with a brand.  Not only is this generation hit with traditional marketing in their everyday lives, but these digital inhabitants are also bombarded by a whole different wave of brand messaging online.  And because access to product review information, pricing, and more resides at the tap of a finger, they’re known for seeking out authentic experiences to cut through the information overload.

While companies regularly use online platforms like social media and websites to share organic content and brand stories, it’s just as alluring to shoppers when done well in-store.

Merchandising displays and interactive kiosks can play a big role in helping to paint a brand picture to customers.  A sleek free-standing display with a monitor featuring a video loop of a runner wearing her fitness tracker draws in the person who identifies with that woman.  A shoe display with signage detailing how proceeds go to charity gives potential buyers the warm and fuzzies.  Predictably, these little details help people feel more invested in your brand.

Interactive displays that allow shoppers to test a product are equally effective.  Just ask the crowd of children waiting their turn at the video game demo at Best Buy.  These displays are magnets, drawing in the customers and promoting the products while people eagerly test drive them in the store.

The Grocery Game Plan

It’s not just big box stores that employ consumer psychology to encourage shoppers to buy.  Grocery stores follow their own set of guidelines to persuade additional purchases.

Your journey to impulse buying starts before you even step foot in the door.  In an interview for a Today.com article, “Supermarkets wage war for your dollars,” marketing consultant Martin Lindstrom details an experiment of doubling the size of a shopping cart.  The results?  People ended up purchasing 40 percent more.  So grabbing a cart the size of a Cadillac has already primed the customer to fill it.

On entry, grocers like to promote the seasonal treats that are hard to pass up.  And if you manage to do so, you’ll see them populated through the store as tempting reminders.

Produce often comes next and for good reason.  When you feel good about buying healthy items, you’re more likely to cave down the line when faced with junk food temptations.  With all that healthy food in your cart, surely you deserve a treat.

And what about those staples like milk and eggs that brought you to the store in the first place?  You’ll find those in the back of the building, forcing you to walk down an aisle or two of enticing food shelved at eye level.

Finally, just as you roll to the checkout line, congratulating yourself on avoiding the lure of snack food, you’re left waiting while staring at the array of chocolate bars and candy thoughtfully organized on the row racks.

Okay, fine.  Just one candy bar won’t hurt.

The New Hip Spot to Hang

It’s no secret that, in the current market of online competition, retailers have had to get creative to get feet through the door.

It’s why there’s been so much buzz around experiential retail – the practice of offering an experience during what would normally be a traditional shopping trip.

We’ve seen it at places like Target stores that often have Starbucks coffee shops and retailers such as Tommy Bahamas that offer restaurants within some of their brick-and-mortar stores.

Even generous sampling can attract a crowd, as Costco knows all too well.  (In fact, Costco’s sampling has its own fascinating psychology.)

Brand retailers are taking experiential retail even further. There’s been big buzz around Nike’s Live concept that not only offers services like style consultations and the ability to try out products, but also curates collections based on where stores are located.  NordstromREI, and countless other brands have jumped on the bandwagon as well, realizing that engaging with customers and “activating” their shopping experience leads to increased sales.

Us humans are a simple bunch when it comes down to it.  We’re often driven by emotions, which means when retailers can capitalize on this fact, they’d be silly not to.  So the next time you find yourself in an aisle seriously contemplating taking home a fancy juicer you didn’t know you needed, consider the neuromarketing behind what’s driving your behavior.

We’re big geeks about retail!  Did we miss other strategies that brands and retailers use to delight shoppers and encourage more purchases?  Let us know in the comments or on social media.

Whitepaper Retail Zivelo

Preface – We’re at an inflection point in physical retail experiences:

2019 may very well be marked as a turning point. For the first time in five years same-store sales are stable (versus declining), break-out e-commerce brands continue solidify their positions of growth by opening physical stores, and as retailers turn to their previously under-capitalized fleet of stores (after-all, they were investing in the big growth of ecommerce when 90%+ of their sales still happen in stores).

whitepaper retail zivelo thesis
Click to see full image

Success stories like Target, which invested $7BN in 2017 into capital improvements, are encouraging other retailers like Ulta, Home Depot, and more to follow suit. (For any haters/mathematicians, while the absolute square footage of retail closures is still closing at a notable pace because of big brands like Bon Ton, Toys”R”Us, and others shuttering their doors – it’s the continued results of a consumer flight to quality).

So, now that it’s come to it, what do you do? How do you revamp your stores? Many times when we sit down with retail executive teams considering building out the future of their store fleets, the words on the board begin to look like a TechCrunch word cloud. “AR! VR! Chatbots! A.I.! Drones!”

Seriously.

But the reality should be, well, different. When considering deploying retail technology your team’s decisions should center around one singular ideology: human interactions have to come first, and technology should come second. And that technology, by the way, should beautifully integrate into authentic store experiences. Consumer expectations are still out-pacing a lot of the retail experience of today.

The retail market itself is on the cusp of massive change as it sprints to meet these demands. In this white paper, discover ways to thoughtfully execute retail-technology solutions that enable experiences that delight customers, empower associates, provide unprecedented analytics, and measurable sales growth.

To download the full whitepaper click here.

Or you can download here:

  • To quick download the whitepaper we do ask for some contact information to discourage autobots and also in case our sponsors would like to contact you.




 

Online Retailers Moving To Physical Stores – Bloomberg podcast

Online Companies Physical Stores

Matt Townsend, global business reporter for Bloomberg, on how digital natives like Warby Parker have recognized they need physical stores to grow and prosper. Hosted by Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz.

Source: www.bloomberg.com

Nice audio podcast. Main point being online advertising is getting more and more expensive while brick & mortar is getting cheaper and cheaper. Lots of added benefits to B&M too. Examples as well. Recommended

Updated: Retail Kiosk Case Studies

See the updated Retail Kiosk Case Studies page

Interactive Retail Kiosk

Retail kiosk image
Click to Expand Image

Interactive retail kiosks are the largest segment of deployed kiosks. Analysts estimate that retail kiosks comprise at least 30% of the entire self-service kiosk market. Locations include Department Stores, Grocery Stores, Big Box Specialty Retailers and Convenience Stores.

Retail kiosks provide convenient services to customers such as bridal and gift registry, non-stock product ordering, wayfinding directories, employment, product lookup, company information and targeted offers. These services increase consumer awareness and offer new channels for retailers to grow their business.

Retail Kiosk Benefits

  • In-store product ordering kiosks reduce on-hand inventory and associated warehouse costs
  • Wayfinding directory kiosks reduce employee headcount and improve customer service
  • Kiosks offering promotional opportunities through coupon printing and other targeted offers increase revenues
  • Loyalty cards reward frequent customers, increasing brand loyalty
  • HR Self-Service applications can be utilized in an in-store retail kiosk for after-hours use, leveraging your existing investment

Retail Kiosk ROI

Studies show an average of 7% increase in incremental sales when kiosks are added. More compelling investment returns are as follows:

  • Self-service kiosks reduce costs by lowering employee headcount
  • Gift card kiosks increase revenue at off-site locations
  • More loyal customers encourage new customers
  • Reduction in inventory overhead and warehousing costs
  • Increased customer satisfaction = increased sales
  • Lower headcount for HR departments with multi-use kiosks

Some of the advantages discussed include:

  • Virtual sales assistance for customers
  • Expanding the footprint of the retailer
  • Reducing labor costs
  • Redeploy staff to increasing revenues
  • Eliminate standing in line (line busting)

Good examples of kiosks like this are the ones in REI where you can look up extended stock and sizes, same thing for Cabela’s and also Kohls.

Generation Z and the Impact on Retail

Generation Z and the Impact on Retail

Once upon a time, it was all about the millennials.

There’s probably a terrible joke in there somewhere, considering the fact this group is often plagued with the reputation of being the “participation trophy” generation.

Kidding aside, for years, millennials have frequently stolen news headlines that highlight the powerful group’s impact on consumerism, the changing workforce, and even the shifting trends on how we communicate with each other.

But in the last few months, several industry newsletters have appeared in my inbox with surprising editorial about the upcoming generation, dubbed Gen Z.  Have millennials officially passed the baton to the next up-and-comers who will be the driving force behind retail and marketing trends?

Spoiler alert, Marketers: you’ll want to get your game plan ready for this group.  Quickly.

As with all generation groupings, there’s often discrepancy amongst the various sources regarding which birth years make up the classification.  Most cite the oldest Gen Z’ers being born in 1996.  Regardless, this group of teenagers and early 20-somethings have become a much-talked-about dynamo as people start looking to the post-millennial era.

To understand the impact this latest generation will have on retail and branding, one must first understand the collective mentality ascribed to the group.
genz-impact-shopping.jpgIt should come as no surprise in our digital culture that a defining feature of this generation is being continuously connected, naturally shifting between an online and offline world without friction.  And while millennials are instinctively comfortable with technology due to growing up in the Internet era, Gen Z brings the term digital natives to a whole new, mobile-friendly level – the soundtrack to their lives isn’t the click of a mouse, but the tap of a thumb.

Along with boasting a natural ease navigating mobile technology, this latest generation also expects lightning-fast Internet speeds, enjoys easy access to instant information, and are often champions behind social causes.

As consumers, they tend to be pragmatic with their spending.  After all, this generation’s formative years were spent witnessing a major financial recession in 2007 and 2008.  Furthermore, they’re wary of more traditional marketing initiatives in favor of recommendations and product reviews and prefer to engage with a product versus viewing it behind glass door displays.

To reach this generation of social media connoisseurs, brands will need to meet them on their turf while speaking a language that resonates.  According to a white paper titled, “Uniquely Generation Z: What brands should know about today’s youngest consumers” by IBM Institute for Business Value and in association with the National Retail Federation, when asked what they do in their free time, 74 percent of Gen Z respondents listed spending time online.

Naturally, marketers would be wise to engage these individuals using social media and mobile opportunities while utilizing easily-absorbable media and messages like video and push notifications.

This group is also savvy about tuning out ads in fast-paced newsfeeds and media, so companies should aim to pique interest using branded or socially-conscious content that aims to help, inform or entertain.  Companies who team up with trusted peer influencers or encourage this generation’s feedback will additionally have a leg up against the brands employing more traditional advertising.

Appealing to the group’s mobile astuteness, companies can provide seamless shopping by offering mobile apps to complement the in-store experience.  This self-reliant generation will feel comfortable in a familiar mobile environment, using it to shop, peruse reviews and communicate with customer service.

When it comes to designing store displays and kiosks that will attract this age group’s attention, brands and retailers will want to be mindful of implementing experiential components.  As a generation accustomed to self-directed learning (thank you, YouTube), they’ll appreciate accessible products that can be viewed, touched and manipulated.

Self-service kiosks will also be a beacon to this crew to eliminate checkout hassles, long lines and reliance on store employees.  This trend toward self-order kiosks, wayfinding stations and check-in units has already started to emerge in restaurants and stores today as the technology is embraced by this next generation.

In sum, with retail already undergoing monumental shifts in operations to stay relevant in a changing market, these same companies will need to keep their fingers on the pulse of this next generation to produce an experience that speaks their language and captures their spending dollars.

Originally appeared on www.frankmayer.com

More by Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.

Elo – The 2018 Retail Landscape Will Be Driven by Digital Experiences

Original article as published on LinkedIn

retail landscapeThe 2018 Retail Landscape Will Be Driven by Digital Experiences

Luke Wilwerding Elotouch
Luke Wilwerding

Director, North America Sales at Elo

One sector of the retail industry that has taken a beating the past few years has been brick-and-mortar stores. And it’s no wonder; online spending continues to climb. Store closures across the country are happening in record numbers, with 8,600 stores closing in 2017. Predictions of retail’s demise make headlines. However, these calls are overblown, as savvy retailers are working to increase same-store sales by learning to blend the best of both worlds by creating in-store interactive digital experiences.

eMarketer forecasts e-commerce spending will account for almost 10 percent of U.S. retail sales by 2019. That means 90 percent of purchases are still made in physical stores. For many consumers, the convenience of online shopping is no substitute for seeing and interacting with products in person. Even the largest e-tailers recognize this, as evidenced by Amazon.com’s recent acquisition of Whole Foods. To better service this new breed of consumer, retailers are quickly adapting by investing in interactive technologies to enhance in-store convenience and create meaningful experiences.

Here are three areas where digital experiences are set to take off in 2018:

Buy Online, Pick Up In-Store (BOPIS)

BOPIS is a perfect example of the link between online and in-store experiences. By encouraging customers to visit a physical location to pick up their online purchases, retailers are discovering new ways in which sales associates can interact with customers. Not only are wait times reduced, but by knowing orders ahead of time, sales associates are better informed to make recommendations and suggestions for upsell opportunities.

For example, when a customer picks up a TV that was purchased online, the sales associate can suggest a specific brand of sound bar to accompany it. Choosing the right artificial intelligence-driven software can also streamline the ability to add in warranties or rewards, strengthening customer loyalty.

Self-Service

Self-service will mature in 2018, as retailers discover some surprising benefits. The self-service kiosk trend initially began as a convenience for shoppers, but they can also be useful for employee training and help stores and restaurants run more efficiently. For customers, this reduces the likelihood of order mistakes. Self-service kiosks with interactive touchscreens also enable customers to pull up past orders and preferences to assist with purchasing decisions.

Employees can also use this information to their benefit when interacting with customers, as they can make more well-informed and strategic upsell and cross-sell recommendations. Operations are streamlined by reducing waste from orders that needed to be remade, thereby cutting costs.

Interactive Fitting Rooms

One of the more promising examples of in-store technology is happening in the fitting room. By installing digital touchscreens, retailers instantly enhance the shopping experience while also expanding the store’s inventory. For example, when trying on clothes, shoppers can receive intelligent pairings and suggestions. Feeling fabulous in that shirt? Check out this great pair of earrings available to go with it. Pants too large but it’s the only size left? No worries, the store’s entire range of sizes (and colors) online is now literally right at your fingertips.

The convenience of online shopping has had a profound impact on retail in a relatively short period of time. But the fact remains that there will always be a place for physical stores. Despite the rash of store closures, retailers are adapting. Those that embrace this digital transformation by bringing new interactive technologies in-store will be the ones to thrive, while those that don’t will only make room for a new breed of experience-driven retailers.

First posted by TotalRetail on January 31st – http://www.mytotalretail.com/article/the-2018-retail-landscape-will-be-driven-by-digital-experiences

Luke Wilwerding is director of retail solutions at Elo, a company that makes touchscreen displays, monitors, computers and touch screen components.

Doing More — A Success Story – A Child That Should Have Been a Statistic

This is a brief story of Demetrius Napolitano, a young man who should have been a statistic. He grew up and was passed around 30 different foster homes. Today he is not only surviving but thriving…and adopted into a forever family at age 24. This is part of his story and we enjoyed having him speak at SuperSaturday 2018.

 

2017 – What’s in-Store for Retail – Frank Mayer thought session

2017 Recap – What’s in-Store for Retail

Retail kioskAt this time last year, we sat down with our colleagues to discuss what 2017 had on the horizon for retail and how that would translate to in-store merchandising programs and displays.  Their thoughts were captured for our blog post ‘What’s In-Store for 2017.’  Were their predictions spot on?  Let’s review…

Prediction #1: Retailers and brands are asking how they can shrink footprints within brick and mortar establishments and still focus on a targeted product mix for the consumer.

Valuable floor space in brick and mortar stores means displays have to adapt to the needs of retailers and possess a smaller footprint.  

Red Robin is an example of a brand that implemented this plan while not forfeiting important marketing initiatives. The restaurant group’s branded gift card merchandiser offers gift cards, menus and brochures on an unobtrusive display that requires little restaurant real estate.

Prediction #2: In the New Year, retailers and consumers will be expecting more personalized experiences through today’s technology that will enable a truly personalized offering.

It’s no surprise that personalization is key to enriching a person’s interaction with a brand.  After all, customizing an experience can help brands better meet a consumer’s needs.  Nike’s Digital Retail Experience is an exceptional example of seamlessly blending the retail experience with a shopper’s desires.

PPG Pittsburgh Paint’s Voice of Color program also brings a level of activation to the buying process with its PPG Color Work Station. Featuring a 42-inch touch screen mounted between paint chip display panels, customers can visit the interactive unit to browse paint choices by color, style and personality as well as find coordinating palette inspiration, view color-tip videos and product information, and paint a virtual room.

Prediction #3: With an increasing number of millennials becoming  primary household consumers, self-help retail will likely be expanding, making an effective point-of-purchase program essential for brick and mortar stores in 2017.

Imagine running into the grocery store for a few essentials and skipping the wait in line.  Currently, Kroger is testing its ‘Scan, Bag, Go’ shopping experience to address this longstanding consumer pain point.  Customers use electronic devices found on kiosks at the front of the store to scan items and bag them before paying electronically and heading home.  

The program is already available at select Cincinnati area stores, with the plan to be in 400 stores nationwide by next year.

Prediction #4: The industrial internet of things will come into its own in 2017 because of the strategic benefits that IoT affords, such as cost efficiencies, convenience and consumer personalization experiences.

The internet of things buzz phrase has gained traction, with HubSpot’s marketing blog devoting an entire post on “why we should care – a lot.”

From smart refrigerators to in-home puppy cams, 2017 has seen people embrace the convenience of being connected at all times.  But how does this continue to influence the POP industry?

As brands focus energy on ensuring their products create accessibility for customers, point-of-purchase manufacturers will be trusted to envision ways to highlight those features to intended audiences through in-store merchandising.

“We are the last three feet of marketing,” says Ron Bowers, Senior Vice President of Business Development at Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. “It’s the point where consumers make the decision to purchase.  And because smart home technology is still new and constantly evolving, it’s our responsibility to create awareness and educate customers through displays that showcase product benefits, convenience and more.”

As the internet of things flourishes, the POP industry will remain an essential component to brands looking to inform customers on how their products can make life simpler.

The overall consensus?  We think we did pretty well anticipating what 2017 would bring.  Did any big trends miss our radar?  We’d love to hear your thoughts.

And of course, stay tuned for the ‘What’s in Store for 2018’ post next month!

365 Retail Markets Reaches Wireless Milestone With OptConnect – Vending Times

Optconnect
Optconnect

KAYSVILLE, UT -– OptConnect Managed Wireless Solutions said that in fewer than 18 months, 365 Retail Markets has connected more than 5,000 OptConnect cellular units in its micromarket applications across the U.S. Keysville, UT-based OptConnect’s wireless technology allows new devices to be deployed rapidly, without any need to connect to the location’s existing network connection. This helps to ensure a more reliable network with improved uptime and security without the IT hassle, or delays, accordin

Source: www.vendingtimes.com

“OptConnect has been a perfect companion offering to our micromarket hardware and software,” said 365 Retail Markets founder and chief executive Joe Hessling. “Hard-wired Internet connections are costly and a pain to setup and manage, with OptConnect Operators can be connected and operational in a matter of minutes, serving customers and making sales more quickly than ever before.”

New Cashierless Smart Store – Prototype in California

Automated Retail – the Cashierless Retail – Smart Store

cashierless retail smart store

New Smart Store without Cashiers – Prototype in California – Retail Industry News & Automation

Source: retailsystems.org

Look Ma.. no cashier!

Key cashierless elements to consider

  •  Retailers must accept all forms of payments including EBT within the mobile wallets
  • Training of consumers will lead to greater adoption of unique store concepts
  • Technology uptime in cashierless stores is bound to experience periodical complexities including, but not limited to, automated checkout. As a result retailers should prepare a fall back plan to prevent customer backlash
  • New store concepts are more effective when targeted towards specific customer segments
  • Cashierless stores could save customers time if executed properly– specifically due to the time saved in terms of scanning/bagging and customers using automated mobile wallets for payments. According to a recent Ensemble IQ and Amex survey, average mobile wallet transaction time is less than 1 minute compared to an average of 2.3 minutes for credit/debit cards. Millennials and others in this research study indicated that they want a greater degree of freedom in terms of their overall shopping experience including checkout.

Retail Technology Landscape Infographic – retail kiosk

Nice graphic showing various technologies (albeit incomplete for retail kiosks).

retail technology landscape

Technology has certainly seen a big evolution over the last few decades.

In the consumer world, we’ve moved from large desktops and rotary dial phones to razor-thin laptops and smartphones with 10 times the amount of computing power. With each new gadget faster than the one before it, consumers’ expectations for retail interactions have seen a significant shift.

As a result, it should come as no surprise that the technology used in the retail industry has evolved over the past thirty years. In an effort to keep up with consumers’ demands, and with the internet pushing them into the eCommerce era, retailers have been searching and experimenting with ways to satisfy target audiences.

Brick-and-mortar technology. It’s a hot topic for debate and many have questioned whether or not integrating technology into physical stores will help or hinder their existence.

Full article on Pymnts.com recommended

http://www.pymnts.com/news/retail/2017/brick-and-mortars-technology-evolution/

 

Nike uses AR augmented reality in Paris retail

A Nike Store in Paris unveiled a new in-store machine which allows customers to test custom colors on sneakers using augmented reality.

Source: www.digitaltrends.com

Nike has slowly been testing how augmented reality can help customers. Last year, the company filed a patent application for an augmented reality system that helped people reach their exercising goals.

NIKEiD AUGMENTED from SmartPixels on Vimeo.

5 Ways to Create In-Store Experiences That Drive Traffic and Sales – Vend Retail Blog

Consumers now have tons of choices when it comes to where and how to shop. Here are 5 tips to ensure they choose you over your competitors.

Source: blog.vendhq.com

  1. Bring website in-store
  2. Redefine checkout experience
  3. provide “retailtainment”
  4. promote community
  5. create immersive experiences

 

Digital merchandising leader establishes new headquarters in Chicago for QSR and retail partners to rapidly prototype and test merchandising solutions

CHICAGO — September 29, 2016 — Coates, a global leader in digital merchandising software, kiosks, and digital drive-thrus, expands the reach of its world-class products with the opening of its U.S. headquarters in Chicago, which includes a fully equipped innovation lab. The new Coates Lab offers quick service restaurants (QSR), retail brands and agencies a state-of-the-art space for a hands-on, personalized experience of the future of digital merchandising. With more than 50 years of leadership in digital solutions, Coates is in a unique position to take customers from proof of concept, design and manufacturing to installation and support, to provide their customers the most engaging experience.

Source: www.coatesgroup.com

Coates Lab encompasses displays, kiosks, digital drive-thru solutions, beacons, facial recognition and social media powered by Switchboard, the groundbreaking, data-driven content management system (CMS) developed by Coates. Switchboard enables brands to deliver a personalized and localized one-to-one experience in-store, similar to what online retailers offer on their websites, with an online record of the buyers’ past purchase history and a personalized greeting using Coates’ Switchboard content management system.

Retail display news – Braven Bluetooth® audio brand expands their wireless speakers line at retail with demonstration displays

Portable Bluetooth® audio brand, Braven, has been expanding their retail display presence across the U.S. The expanded line of outdoor, take-anywhere speakers has necessitated new in-store display solutions. The in-line counter displays, designed and produced by Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.  are placed in retailers nationwide.

Grafton, WI, August 9, 2016 – Braven, a premium portable Bluetooth® audio brand, has been expanding their retail presence across the U.S.

Braven Display
Click for full image

The expanded Braven line of outdoor, rugged, take-anywhere speakers has necessitated new in-store display solutions.  Today’s mobile consumer of cutting edge technology demands a retail display design that complements the technology.

Braven has partnered with Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. to design, engineer and produce displays with the rugged styling it is known for worldwide. The display’s secured wireless outdoor speakers have customized interactive play controls with demo tracks that feature the qualities of each model. The in-line counter displays are placed in retailers nationwide.

Braven Display
Click for full image

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. is an industry leader in the creative design and manufacturing of branded in-store merchandising displays, interactive kiosks and store fixtures for leading consumer product companies and retailers. Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.’s headquarters are based in Grafton, Wisconsin with offices nationwide.

BRAVEN combines unparalleled style with cutting-edge technology to produce premium Bluetooth speakers for the outdoor adventurer and modern audiophile. Founded in 2011, BRAVEN’s focus on audio quality, ease of use and superior features has quickly transformed the brand into one of the fastest growing wireless audio brands in the industry. For more information about BRAVEN, please visit www.braven.com or connect on Facebook at facebook.com/bravenproducts and Instagram @bravenproducts.

###

The press release is attached, along with an image of the merchandisers. The Braven Wireless Bluetooth Display program product page can be found: http://www.frankmayer.com/in-store-merchandising/braven-wireless-bluetooth-speaker-display/.  The press release can also be found: http://www.frankmayer.com/about-fma/frank-mayer-news/

Press Release PDF

Intel Retail Solutions Guide

Intel Guide to retail solutions based on personalization.

“The Retailers’ Guide to Creating Personalized Shopping Experiences” for an overview of the latest Intel® technology-based, in-store solutions that can attract customers’ attention, exceed expectations, and benefit your bottom line, including:

    • Increasing brand awareness and in-store visits by presenting customers with relevant offers and information in timely and personalized ways.
    • Influencing customers at the point-of-decision to upsell and cross-sell, introduce new products, or move old ones—all of which directly contribute to revenue.
    • Allowing customers to shop the way they want, using a combination of channels (in-store, online, mobile, self-service) to flexibly engage with your brand in satisfying ways that keep them coming back.
    • Maintaining ongoing communications with customers to show you appreciate them both before and after the sale, which generates repeat business.
    • A virtual shopping solution that extends in-store and online inventory of large items.
    • Harnessing the power of big data analytics to track customer responses to campaigns and promotions, optimize media spends, and measure ROI.

Intel Retail Solutions whitepaper guide