Category Archives: picks

Picks are the most newsworthy of articles posts on the site.

ZIVELO Wins Two Awards at ICX Summit

ZIVELO Wins 2 Awards at ICX Summit for Achievement in Interactive Customer Experiences.

The #1 QSR mobile kiosk company receives two awards

Zivelo Wins AwardDallas, TX – June 13, 2018 – ZIVELO, the leader in interactive self-service kiosk and digital signage solutions in the QSR arena, has been appointed to receive two prestigious awards at the ICX Summit in Dallas on Wednesday, June 13, 2018. The Elevate Awards honor the individuals and organizations that are pacesetters in using technology to elevate customer experience.

ZIVELO will receive Best ICX Deployment: Restaurant and Best ICX Deployment: Financial Services at this year’s ICX Association Elevate Awards for providing nearly 10,000 kiosks to one of the top three  QSR’s in North America, and for their groundbreaking virtual banking expert kiosks deployed at a top US-based financial institution.

ZIVELO produces award-winning, self-service kiosk and digital signage solutions for a portfolio of global companies. This includes the top three fast food chains in the nation, as well as top brands across the retail, banking, healthcare, restaurant, and hospitality industries. Their newly launched software product, OakOS, allows ZIVELO’s customers and third-party developers to rapidly build and deploy applications with the only developer kit designed for kiosks. Clients can now develop fully-functional applications within days, by using OakOS’ comprehensive web-based frameworks and SDK. Backed by ZIVELO’s network of support technicians, this comprehensive offering removes previous common barriers in the industry.

About ZIVELO

ZIVELO’s mission is to revolutionize the way brands use technology to interact with their consumers on-premise and in the physical world. Founded in 2008, ZIVELO has rapidly grown to become the leading self-service technology brand offering a sleek and sophisticated product design, intuitive user experience, and cutting-edge modular hardware solutions. In 2018, ZIVELO acquired Oak Labs, the creators of OakOS – the world’s first operating system for public computing experiences. Through the acquisition, ZIVELO now provides brands with an end-to-end solution for the roll-out of kiosks and digital signage. For more information, please visit http://www.zivelo.com/.




For more information contact Kiosk Industry

Acquisition – SICOM Acquires Self-Order Point of Sale Solutions Provider NEXTEP SYSTEMS

SICOM Acquires Self-Order Point of Sale Solutions Provider NEXTEP SYSTEMS

Lansdale, PA and Troy, MI – June 12, 2018 –Nextep Systems Order Kiosk SICOM announced today the acquisition of NEXTEP SYSTEMS, a provider of self-ordering point of sale solutions, digital signage and restaurant management software for managed food service, quick service and fast casual restaurants. NEXTEP’s lineup of self-ordering solutions includes kiosks, touchscreen drive thru systems and mobile ordering and will be added to SICOM’s Encounter™ Omni-Channel Point of Sale platform.

NEXTEP was founded by Tommy Woycik when he realized self-ordering technology could prevent people from waiting in lines at restaurants. After creating its first self-ordering solution, NEXTEP has expanded its product catalog to include a full spectrum of order management solutions on its single-platform, cloud-based architecture.

NEXTEP has also introduced several innovative technologies in the self-ordering space, including Intelligent Upsell™ for increasing check averages and facial recognition functionality that provides a personalized guest experience.

“We are truly excited to welcome NEXTEP to the SICOM family,” said Jim Flynn, CEO of SICOM. “The talented team at NEXTEP has created an impressive lineup of industry-leading and inventive self-ordering technologies, and this acquisition will allow SICOM to offer the most comprehensive omni-channel point of sale platform in the industry. We’re also excited to expand into managed food service and fast casual restaurants with a broader and proven suite of products designed specifically for these markets.”

“The team at NEXTEP has accomplished a tremendous amount since our inception in 2005,” said Tommy Woycik, President and Founder of NEXTEP. “SICOM is a perfect fit for NEXTEP, and we are excited to join a company with the same level of commitment to providing leading technology solutions to managed food service providers and quick service and fast casual restaurants. We’re confident that joining forces with SICOM will provide new opportunities for the NEXTEP team and our customers.”

ABOUT NEXTEP SYSTEMS

From Self Order Kiosks and Touchscreen Drive Thrus to mobile ordering and traditional POS terminals, the NEXTEP SYSTEMS solution empowers guests to check out faster, resulting in bigger check totals and higher sales volume. With 7 patents granted and 4 more pending, NEXTEP SYSTEMS offers the industry’s first and only 360° integrated foodservice technology platform to more than 1,500 managed food service, QSR, and fast casual customers.

ABOUT SICOM

SICOM Systems, Inc. is a leading best-of-breed provider of end-to-end technologies and services for quick service and fast casual restaurants. The company offers front-of-house solutions (Digital Menu Boards, Point of Sale and Order Confirmation Units), back-of-house solutions (Drive-Thru Director™ and Chef™ Kitchen Management), as well as above-restaurant solutions (360° Data Analytics, SEMS4 Restaurant Management and RTIconnect Restaurant Management) that are helping leading restaurant brands around the globe streamline their operations. SICOM has over 40,000 digital menu boards, 8,000+ Drive-Thru Directors and 7,000+ Chef Kitchen Management solutions in operation worldwide, while its Point of Sale systems are in more than 6,500 restaurants worldwide and it has more than 10,000 restaurants leveraging its enterprise management systems. Founded in 1987, SICOM is headquartered in Lansdale, Pa. and can be found online at www.SICOM.com.




For more information contact Kiosk Industry

SEKO MedTec Solutions – Introduction for Logistics and Kiosk Installation

SEKO MedTec Solutions – Introduction for Logistics and Kiosk Installation

Supply Chain Services Precisely for the Kiosk Industry

SEKO MedTec is our newest premium member and here is an introduction to the company and their services.

Seko MedTech Kiosk Installation
Sensitive, high-value equipment deserves sensitive, high-value logistics.

SEKO MedTec Solutions focuses on providing specialized, turnkey transportation, logistics, warehousing, and installation services for sensitive, high-value and highly visible equipment for our clients around the world.

Our expertise and service structure make us the optimal partner for the interactive kiosk, digital signage, touch screen, and store fixture industry. An overview of our program and services includes:

  • Dedicated Logistics Coordinators in SEKO Control Towers
  • Regional distribution warehouses to reduce transportation spend
  • Specialized, scheduled, “White Glove” pickup and delivery
  • Customized delivery and installation services
  • US and Canadian ground transportation via SEKO Air-ride network
  • Equipment installation, setup, testing, repairs, swaps, and returns
  • MySEKO, our online portal, provides real-time visibility and control of your orders as well as comprehensive supply-chain reporting
  • Asset and Event Management system manages device history records, administers equipment maintenance, and gives you the ability to view andtrack all of your assets in the field
  • Removal and returns management (inspection, testing, cleaning, kitting, packing, recycling, and certified destruction)
  • Forward stocking locations
  • Recurrent inventory expertise for Lease/Loaner programs
  • Complete logistics for trade shows and other short-term events
  • Custom crate and packaging evaluation, design, and production

The benefits of our service include:

  • Improving customer satisfaction through timely and professional equipment delivery and installation
  • Ensuring your equipment consistently arrives in great condition and is functioning properly
  • Expanding your domestic and international footprint with parts depot storage, logistics, and support services
  • Minimizing administrative time and expense with one primary point of contact
  • Utilizing our cutting-edge online technology to minimize transportation expense, collect extensive amounts of data for financial and operational KPI analysis, run customized reports, and view real-time metrics
  • Increasing customer satisfaction by ensuring equipment is routinely and professionally maintained
  • Enhancing equipment information with documented maintenance and repair records
  • Improving knowledge of customer experience with our dedicated questionnaire program

Asset and Event Management

Whether you have complex installations of in-store displays or need to launch new products in hundreds of sites by a definite date, SEKO is there for you around the globe with our Asset and Event Management technology and services. Designed specifically to accommodate rigid deadlines, little or no down time, and irregular pickup and delivery hours, this is the most dependable way to schedule people and products and ensure they arrive on time to reduce costs and significantly enhance client service. Our technology gives you real-time visibility into your assets out in the field, while we manage the transportation and all the related logistics.

Case Study

One of our customers, Sphere 3D Corp., delivers virtualization technology and data management products that enable workload-optimized solutions. Read what they have to say about the service and performance provided by the SEKO.

Please Contact Us

Pat Sheehan
Director of Business Development
SEKO MedTec Solutions
3006 Research Drive, Suite A-2
State College, PA 16801
Office: +1 814-231-1331
Mobile: +1-814-380-0676/
Web: www.sekologistics.com/en/industries/technology

SEKO MedTec Solutions is a proud part of SEKO Logistics:

  • Founded in 1976, HQ in Chicago
  • Regional Headquarters: London and Hong Kong
  • 120+ Offices in more than 40 Countries, $750M Revenue
  • Provides creative, customized Supply Chain Solutions, specializing in transportation, logistics, forwarding, warehousing, and IT
  • Global implementation experience and expertise across all industry sectors



For more information contact Kiosk Industry

Drive Thru Kiosk Solutions – Real World

Drive Thru Kiosk Solutions

From Steve Evans and Nextep

Hello all!

Nextep Systems Order KioskIt’s been pretty busy but I wanted to stop for a moment and congratulate the following 5 locations for their implementations of our World’s Fastest Drive Thru™ Solution:

• Bennett Holdings Group – #10199 Johnstown, PA

• Kristen Chandler – #68779 Midland, TX

• Russell Rogers – #50511 Bentonville, AR

• Steve Adams – #59469 Anchorage, AK (FIRST IN ALASKA!!)

• Ricky & Niki Cook – #13878 Walhalla, SC

Beautiful locations for all with many more to come this year! Speed, accuracy, throughput, and so much more have been key factors with these rollouts. If you are in the area for one of the locations, stop by for breakfast, lunch, and dinner to experience it for yourself!

drive thru kiosk solutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit Nextep for your Drive Thru Solutions!

Contact Us

2155 Butterfield Drive, Suite 111 
Troy, MI 48084

866-654-8730

You can also contact Olea Kiosks [email protected] or 800-927-8063




For more information contact Kiosk Industry

New Guided Setup in KioWare 8.14 Makes Setup Even Easier Than Before

Guided Setup added to KioWare for Windows

6/5/2018

KioWare for Windows with Guided SetupVersion 8.14 of KioWare for Windows is now available with a brand new Guided Setup allowing customers to quickly and easily set up KioWare for Windows to display interactive and non-interactive digital signage, videos, and KioCall video conferencing. With this new Guided Setup, KioWare can be configured to secure a Windows device into a kiosk with only a few clicks.  New supported devices have also been added.

June 5, 2018 York, PA  – Analytical Design Solutions Inc. (ADSI) has released a new version of KioWare for Windows kiosk software with an all new Guided Setup wizard to help first time users configure KioWare for Windows.

KioWare kiosk software products lock down your device into kiosk mode, which secures the overall operating system, home screen, and usage of applications.

In addition to the new Guided Setup tool, version 8.14 of KioWare for Windows (Lite, Basic, & Full with Kiosk Management) has added support for Chrome 65. KioWare Basic & KioWare Full for Windows now support devices such as the Stimare printer (supporting printing to RFID bracelets), Star printers, Telequip (coin dispensers), Epson receipt printers, and support for ccTalk for bill/coin acceptors.  View all supported devices here.

The new Guided Setup provides users with the option to easily configure KioWare for Windows to show interactive content (browser-based), non-interactive digital signage, and as a video conferencing kiosk using the KioCall Videoconferencing app. Additional settings can also be configured by answering questions and progressing through the Guided Setup. As always, users can opt to exit the Guided Setup and configure KioWare directly through the configuration tool at any time.

Support must be current to upgrade to the latest version.

Additional features are also included in this release. View a full description of features added to this and other versions of the KioWare product line.

These products are available as a free trial with nag screen at https://m.kioware.com/downloads. Existing clients can upgrade at https://www.kioware.com/downloadupgrade.aspx.

KioWare has been providing OS, desktop, and browser lockdown security for the kiosk and self-service industry since 2003.

Sign up to receive emails about future updates to the KioWare product here.

KioWare Guided Setup




For more information contact Kiosk Industry

Are You Ready for 20-30% Lift Ticket?

zivelo kiosksAre You Ready for 20-30% Lift Ticket?

Many restaurants in the industry begin their self-service technology journey with a pole-mounted tablet solution.

However, these solutions don’t significantly disrupt consumer behaviors to increase ticket size and ROI. Additionally, they break down easily, the entire unit has to be replaced when this happens, and this solution is often scrapped in order to deploy a new product set at significant additional cost. Below we have outlined just a few of the benefits of our large-screen solutions, with durable commercial-grade components, the ability to update and repair individual units thanks to our modular design, and more. Plus, all of our product footprints can be adjusted to fit any size and space while still leading to greater ROI than other smaller screen solutions. It’s time to discover the ZIVELO difference, and rely on our experience successfully deploying thousands of kiosks to the top QSR’s in the nation. Are you ready to work with the best?

Click here for infographic or click on graphic




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Feature – EMV Self-Service Update for Self-Order Kiosks 2018

EMV Update for Self-Order Kiosks

EMV deadlines have arrived, but many choose to skip the upgrade. EMV is still split into two big camps. One that is compliant and the other which will  be, but not yet.   Our prime supporting sponsor for this update is KioWare. Thanks!

EMV card reader
Ingenico is the largest provider of self-service EMV for unattended and contributed to this resource article.

By Richard Slawsky contributor

Which costs more, complying with new regulations or not complying and hoping for the best?

The question is particularly relevant when it comes to kiosk deployers complying with Europay, Mastercard and Visa (EMV) regulations. Invest in upgrading equipment, or run the risk of being hit with chargebacks and fines in the event of fraud?

Although the lack of clear incentives or financial impacts have prompted some to skip those upgrades, it may be wiser to begin the planning process now. When the inevitable kiosk fraud case makes headlines, it will likely set off a compliance rush that may leave some deployers waiting months or years to get their devices upgraded and certified.

Meeting EMV deadlines

The Wikipedia entry for EMV defines it as “a payment method based upon a technical standard for smart payment cards and for payment terminals and automated teller machines that can accept them.” EMV “smart cards” store their data on integrated circuits in addition to the traditional magnetic stripes.

The Path to EMV
  • CC readers as keyboard wedge. They take input & then act like a keyboard echoing out the numbers thru port.
  • Credit companies keep data on unprotected and unencrypted servers.
  • Europe sees better way & requires solid encryption paired with a PIN (aka Chip and Pin).
  • The US defers requiring that for time being and does not follow Europe’s lead.
  • Growth of Internet and rise of credit cards Mastercard and VISA in US agree that encryption is a good thing. Maybe even a PIN…
  • EMV liability timetable put in motion. ATMs hugely affected (in US only) as are retailers.
  • CC readers add encryption in advance. Magtek and IDTech good examples. Instead of open Keyboard Wedges we now have encryption capabilities. No chip, though, and no PIN.
  • Deadline nears – everybody knows it is time to use chips, assuming liability for not doing so is above profit threshold. Somebody that does relatively small transactions will never be a target for stolen credit cards (Redbox e.g.). Does liability outweigh cost of upgrading, and affecting bottom line and potentially share price?
  • Signature used or zip code as presumed id token.
  • Data systems becoming more secure with better firewalls, less physical access, and encryption but most are not.
  • Big incidents (Target) increases pressure to upgrade all systems. Target’s backend was entry point via a vendor with free malware.
  • Nowadays EMV means getting a chip reader. It means securing the back end (ask Equifax…).
  • It used to mean signature too but no more.
  • Does not mean a PIN. With some consumers carrying multiple cards, it is impossible for them to use a secure PIN for each card because they’ll never remember.
  • Card data remains relatively safe on the front end (with CHIP) though there are many who still swipe (40%?) and IT Departments pay more attention to security on back end. One could argue penalties for breaches be increased as money is best motivator. See HIPAA privacy.

Because the chips are supposedly impossible to clone, smart cards offer vastly improved security compared with magstripe-only cards. But while smart cards include a magstripe along with the integrated circuit for backwards compatibility, the improved security only applies when used with an EMV-compliant card reader.

Although EMV compliance is an ongoing process in the United States, EMV technology has been standard in Europe for years with chip-and-PIN standard and contactless payment cards exploding.

“The card I use for business is probably 60% chip and pin 40% contactless by number of transactions, and I don’t think I’ve ever been asked to confirm a contactless payment by providing my pin,” said Nigel Seed, who runs KioWare Europe now. “A lot of people simply mistrust contactless and refuse to ever use it, in fact some people contact their bank and tell then to send them a replacement card without that facility, but busy metro type professionals typically do use it more than the average.”

To incentivize businesses to upgrade their card readers to EMV-compliant devices, the four major U.S. credit card issuers – Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover – established Oct. 1, 2015 as the deadline when credit card fraud liability will shift to merchants or processors if they do not have an EMV payment system ready.

If fraudulent card use occurs at a merchant that has not upgraded their equipment to EMV technology, the merchant eats the cost of the chargeback along with any fines or fees that may be levied. If that merchant’s processor has not made an EMV-compliant solution to the merchant, or if the card issuer has not issued EMV-compliant cards to its cardholders, the processor or card issuer assumes the liability.

Despite that deadline, though, deployers of self-service devices have been slow to bring those devices into compliance with EMV, in part due to the complexity and cost of upgrading. Making a kiosk or other self-service device EMV-compliant isn’t simply a matter of swapping out a card reader. Along with upgrading the payment terminal and software, other infrastructure involved in the transaction, such as data storage devices, must be upgraded as well.

EMV compliance affects all systems involved in the payment process, not just the payment terminal. Data warehouses are likely the biggest target of all and the eventual destination of data provided at a public terminal. If a retailer takes that highly encrypted data and then stores it as plain text on some in-house data warehouse that thru the vagaries of Microsoft networking is accessible via a simple vendor logging into a portal, they are vulnerable to EMV compliance issues.

In addition to upgrading hardware, compliance also involves the processor and the card issuers certifying that transactions are originating from an EMV-certified device, and that all software and middleware is PCI-DSS complaint as well as being compliant with international operability standards established by EMVCo, the consortium that manages EMV standards. That process could take several months.

What About A Pin Pad?
When do I need a PIN pad? Here are the basics:

The United States has historically had two kinds of Cardholder Verification Methods (CVM); PIN for debit transactions and signature for credit transactions at attended terminals. A signature was not valid for unattended scenarios under the logic that a kiosk can’t check an ID or signature.

In recent weeks card brands declared Signature to be obsolete and optional in the United States. This really had no impact on unattended as the standard for unattended credit purchases was No CVM.

The vast majority of debit cards issued in the US are called “dual application,” meaning they also carry one of the card brand logos and as such can be used on both debit networks (with PIN) and credit networks (optional signature). Think of the phrase ”Visa check card.” The transaction is performed on the credit network, but the money really comes out of your checking account as opposed to a line of credit.

Acceptance of PIN debit at a kiosk is optional, although there are cases where acceptance of debit is beneficial, such as bill pay kiosks where transactions could be potentially very large. This would be advantageous to a bill pay kiosk businesses when you consider a debit transaction has a fixed cost, while a credit transaction has a percentage of the sale amount fee.

From the perspective of fraud protection it is sort of a non-factor because crooks don’t go around paying their bills with stolen cards. In the case of a kiosk in the mall selling $200 headphones, though, it would be advantageous from a cost of transaction perspective as well as the prevention of card fraud and product loss.

Deciding if having a PIN pad on the kiosk is right for you really comes down to a few factors:

What is the average sale amount, and considering that amount does the potential savings of the fixed cost of a debit transaction vs the % cost of a credit transactions justify the increased hardware cost of adding a PIN pad for debit acceptance? Essentially, what is the ROI of the PIN pad and ability to accept debit?

What is the risk and true cost of loss of product at my kiosk, and does that warrant the cost of a PIN pad?

As an example, let’s say a photo kiosk sale amount maxes out at $50, and using an estimated credit transactional cost of 3.5% as a baseline, transactions will cost $1.75 to run as credit. Given debit transactions typically hover around $1.25/$1.50, the outcome of the financial decision tree says maybe the increased solution cost of the kiosk with PIN pad isn’t showing a strong ROI, or at least one that cannot be realized in the short term.

Furthermore, the risk and cost of lost product is low, and it will take selling a lot of prints to make up for the cost of the PIN pad. In this example it would make sense to forgo PIN debit acceptance at the kiosk and instead process debit cards over the credit network.

“Each payment processor generally drives their own certifications, so timing varies pretty dramatically between payment processing certification teams,” said George Hudock, who handles business development with Datacap Systems, a developer of integrated payment systems.

“Most kiosk providers will use a third-party payments solution to avoid the on-going EMV certifications and maintenance, so most are able to avoid the EMV certifications directly,” Hudock said. “However, EMV certifications for unattended devices generally take 3-5 months once queued.”

Although it’s difficult to tell how many non-EMV-compliant kiosks are out in the field, experts say 50-60 percent of point-of-sale terminals aren’t EMV compliant. It’s likely that the percentage of non-EMV-compliant kiosks is similar. Still, experts say it could be several years before the vast majority of self-service devices in the marketplace are brought in line with EMV regulations.

Overall, the EMV migration in the United States is proceeding as well and as speedily as anyone could reasonably expect considering the somewhat tortured circumstances in which it was launched and the technical complexity and costs of its implementation, said Leland Englebardt, Practice Leader, Financial Services at New York-based UpshotAdvisors.

“Remember, it was not long after Dodd-Frank was enacted, which required many significant changes in payment card infrastructure, economics and rules,” Englebardt said.

“We are beginning to see the results in less counterfeit card fraud, which is good for everybody,” he said. “However, the security of EMV is materially enhanced by adding point-to-point tokenization and encryption. As cyber-crime is now the most active and challenging area of payments fraud, it’s possible that in the near future we will see more mandates and/or liability shifts for those technologies.”

EMV confusion still reigns

Part of what seems to be hampering EMV compliance is a lack of clarity on the part of deployers over where kiosks fall under EMV regulations. Is there a difference between attended and unattended devices? What about those that accept or dispense cash?

According to Visa’s Transaction Acceptance Device Guide Version 3.1, the term Unattended Cardholder Activated Terminal (UCAT) refers to an acceptance device managed by a merchant that dispenses goods or services, at which the card and cardholder are present, but the functions and services are provided without the assistance of an attendant to complete the transaction. These devices include cardholder activated fuel pumps, self-service vending units, and self-service payment devices in parking garages or at parking meters.

Devices that support cash dispensing and provide goods and services must comply with the Visa rules and regulations appropriate to the transaction:

• When dispensing cash, the device is considered an ATM and, therefore, must adhere to the Visa rules and regulations for ATMs.
• When dispensing goods or services, the device is considered a UCAT and must adhere to the Visa rules and regulations for unattended purchases.

Although unattended devices (e.g., ATMs, UCATs) may dispense goods and services as well as cash, transactions involving a purchase with cash back are not allowed. In other words, an unattended device may dispense either cash or goods and services in a single transaction but not both. In addition, UCATs that dispense scrip are not addressed because the Visa rules and regulations prohibit Visa card products from being used for scrip transactions. (Scrip is a two-part paper receipt redeemable for goods, services or cash.)

Attended Cardholder Activated Terminals, such as self-checkout terminals in supermarkets, are not considered UCATs and therefore are not required to meet UCAT requirements.

The guide also mentions a third category, “semi-attended,” to describe Semi-Attended Cardholder Activated Terminals in the Europe Region.

Semi-Attended Tips
If you want to benefit from low cost EFT like Verifone VX820 series (<200USD) and you want to install in Semi-Attended environment you should cover unneeded and unwanted functions by a plastic form.

Pyramid did it for instance in the McD Europe case. The customer can benefit from the low cost EFT and the “white” form embeds the EFT in an elegant and ergonomic way and in same time it covers the magnetic card function on the side of VX820 which would be not needed and would only make customers unsecure which way to use the device. With our embedded form, that ensures that the customer uses or NFC or Chip Card function.

McDonalds EFT
Click for full size

“This has resulted in self-service manufacturers creating a third optional semi-attended solution, in conjunction with VISA, for those situations,” said Frieder Hansen, co-CEO of Germany’s Pyramid Computer. “Instead, for example, a plain IPP350 or 820 being used (attended), or for purposes of a UCAT using Ingenico 250 series, the third solution would be using an inspectable key-lockable option with a terminal like a 350.”

There is a perception that kiosks are always considered unattended from an EMV perspective, said Allen Friedman, VP of Payment Solutions at Ingenico Group.

“This is not always true,” Friedman said. “Some self-service implementations in attended environments where employee assistance is available, like at the grocery store, can be considered attended devices. If there is any time period where no assistance is available, then it is considered an unattended solution.”

There is also a card brand requirement for unattended devices to make a printed receipt available to cardholders for transactions above $15, Friedman said.

“Designs for kiosks intended to provide merchandise or services above that amount should include a receipt printer with their models to insure compliance,” he said.

Taking the risk

Although kiosk deployers are still asking for non-EMV compliant solutions, kiosk manufacturers seem to be coming down firm on needing EMV-compliant payment solutions for any custom deployment. New projects are likely to take EMV into account throughout the process.

On the other hand, some deployers are likely to stick with non-EMV compliant kiosks to the end of their lifespan.

“Deployers aren’t as educated on this as they need to be,” Laura Miller with KioWare said. “They think it doesn’t apply to them, aren’t aware of the risk or think that the risk isn’t high enough to warrant the additional cost.”

EMV-certified options are also still relatively limited, so kiosk providers’ preferred payments providers may not yet have an EMV-certified option for unattended applications.

“Kiosks are also expensive to upgrade to EMV due to a required change in casework to accommodate the updated EMV device,” Hudock said.

EMV & Cloud Services
EMV credit transactions thru the cloud makes things easier. Keyboard wedge changed to HID changed to USB and now changes to Ethernet. A hospital environment with a copay for example in old days would require direct integration between the check-in device and the credit terminal. Which payment processor becomes an issue along with who writes the code.Nowadays you can offload the credit portion via cloud services and all that is required on the check-in or check-out terminal is simple HTTP and JSON call for authorization. The credit device takes over, conducts the transaction (thru preferred provider) via EMV certified kernel and then notifies the check-in/check-out that the transaction is complete.

You eliminate the development cost, and the credit devices can be leased monthly to reduce the upfront cost of going EMV.

You do need an ethernet connection though.
EMV Cloud Service

“The kiosk industry is more fragmented than retail/restaurant,” Hudock said. “This means that there are often multiple constituents involved in delivering the kiosk that need to be involved in the upgrade process, including hardware OEMs, software developers, payments middleware providers, payment processors and installers. Kiosk upgrades tend to take a little more time and planning than retail/restaurant due to the number of involved parties.”

Some of the reluctance for kiosk deployers to adopt EMV is understandable. If the kiosk is near the end of its life cycle, a deployer may choose to ride it out until it’s time to replace the entire device. In addition, the relatively low transaction averaged for many kiosks translates to less overall chargeback risk, which in turn means less incentive to upgrade.

Should a deployer choose to skip making their units EMV compliant, though, at the very least they should place additional attention on security to minimize the possibility of fraud. Those steps could include data clearing technology and secure browsers, end session on a particular page, session timeouts and so forth. In addition, point-to-point encryption and tokens are valuable security measures. P2PE ensures that card data is encrypted at the time of card insertion and maintains that encryption until it’s routed offsite. Tokens ensure that card data is not stored locally for voids or recurring transactions.

“There is less risk of internal compromise of data for a kiosk due to the hardened nature of the casework, but the largest card data security problem facing kiosks is likely card skimmers,” Hudock said. “Because these are generally placed on top of an existing reader, the card is skimmed before security measures like encryption or EMV would have any impact. Merchants need to periodically check their kiosks to confirm that they haven’t been tampered with.”

And as EMV cards and terminals become ubiquitous, banks’ authorization parameters may evolve to limit fallback approvals.

“A kiosk operator who doesn’t upgrade to EMV may find it harder and harder to get a positive mag stripe authorization,” Englebardt said.

“Notwithstanding the liability shift, banks seek to avoid the risk of counterfeit card chargebacks that trigger replacement/reissuance costs and cardholder attrition,” he said. “So revenue erosion is an additional long term business risk for kiosk operators not adopting EMV.”

Other Problems with EMV
So you reside in U.S. and all your cards (for the last year) are the sturdier Chip cards right? And no problems since right?Well, not exactly. The process of manufacture still has kinks. Personally two of my cards have failed just due to electronic failure (both of them from Chase). So malfunctioning cards are a problem.

My Chip cards have needed to be replaced due to fraud instances twice (rarely did before). I am a low volume very restricted credit card user (except for online accounts). Why the increase of breaches?

At the end of the day, though, what’s likely to motivate deployers to upgrade their devices will be the news of a major chargeback and fine associated with a device that wasn’t EMV-compliant.

“There are beginning to be some fines but not publicized and none that would be considered punitive by any measure,” said Geoff Leopold, division manager with Heartland Payment Systems. Still, it’s likely just a matter of time before a major incident occurs.

In addition, some payment processors have begun charging their customers EMV non-compliance fees. Those fees can vary, coming as a flat monthly or annual charge or a percentage of the deployer’s processing volume.

“The bottom line is that processors and banks want you to move to EMV equipment because it’s more secure for everyone,” write Ellen Cunningham in an article on the website CardFellow.com. “If you’ve been holding off on EMV-capable equipment you may want to think about upgrading before more processors begin imposing expensive fees.”

EMV Resources

How EMV works.

EMVCo manages EMV specifications and related testing processes. This includes, but is not limited to, card and terminal evaluation, security evaluation, and management of interoperability issues. EMVCo is a consortium with control split equally among Visa, MasterCard, JCB, American Express, China UnionPay, and Discover.

US Payments Forum — The U.S. Payments Forum (the “Forum”) is a cross-industry body focused on addressing issues that require broad cooperation and coordination across many constituents in the payments industry.  Part of Secure Technology Alliance (see below).

The EMV Connection website provides up-to-date EMV migration information and educational resources. One of those is Chip Cards Facts-at-a-Glance.  It is now US Payments Forum.

EMV Resources page of the Card Acquiring Service (CAS). Offers information and links to helpful EMV information, including the federal government’s move to EMV chip and PIN-enabled card acceptance.

Secure Technology Alliance — The Alliance brings together leading providers and adopters of end-to-end security solutions designed to protect privacy and digital assets in a variety of vertical markets

EMV Contributor Acknowledgements

Thanks to all from us!

 




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A Discouraging State of Affairs – what has happened to the Global Entry Kiosks?

A Discouraging State of Affairs – what has happened to the Global Entry Kiosks?

Francie Mendelsohn is President of Summit Research Associates, Inc.
Francie Mendelsohn is President of Summit Research Associates, Inc.

I have previously written about the impressive Global Entry kiosks, more than 500 having been deployed by the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP). These units, built by Kiosk Information Systems with software developed by the US Government, are installed at 43 US airports, seven Canadian airports and the following international airports: Abu Dhabi, Aruba, Dublin, Guam, Nassau, Saipan and Shannon.  They allow passengers who have enrolled in the Global Entry program–an expedited clearance for pre-approved, low-risk travelers upon their arrival in the United States—quick access through the Customs area through automatic kiosks.  The program frees these passengers from filing out a paper Customs entry form; all required information is produced at the kiosks, theoretically a significant time-saving system.

At airports, program members proceed to Global Entry kiosks, present their machine-readable passport or U.S. permanent resident card, place their fingerprints on the scanner for fingerprint verification and complete a customs declaration. The kiosk issues the traveler a transaction receipt, complete with the passenger’s passport photo, and directs the traveler to a CBP agent and then on to baggage claim and the exit.
Travelers must be pre-approved for the Global Entry program. Called the Trusted Traveler program, all applicants must undergo a rigorous background check, followed by an in-person interview before they are permitted to enroll. The cost is $100.00 for a five-year pass.
At least that the way they were supposed to work. Previously, when I accessed the kiosks at airports including Washington Dulles, LAX, Philadelphia and Miami, the system was a pleasure to use. Although there were some minor glitches (the software did not show passengers how to insert their passport to initiate the process) that required a few attempts to get it right, it was fast and easy to operate.
Global Entry Kiosks
Dulles International Airport was one of the first airports to test the kiosks; it is the jumping-off point for dozens of international flights.  Like highways, airports have rush hours.
At Dulles they are from 7:00-9:00 am (for California flights) and again from 3:00-6:00 for California flights as well as for the dozens of Europe-bound flights. When we arrived after a flight from Munich, it was 3:15pm and the International Arrivals Hall was packed. There are signs directing Global Entry passengers to a special line in order to use the kiosks.
This is a welcome diversion from the hoards of non-registered passengers who have to encounter extremely long lines to go through Customs, especially during that 3-6pm rush hour window.
We quickly saw that almost all of the 30+ kiosks were in use. When one became available, I went to use it. I then saw that the previous user had abandoned the session midway through; the error message on the screen revealed that fact.
There was no way to start over so I waited for another kiosk to become free.  It became apparent that many of the kiosks had suddenly become available. (This was because so many of my fellow-passengers were experiencing the same performance issues as I was.) I tried a kiosk and followed the instructions to insert my passport to begin the session. The kiosk was unable to read my passport so I tried again. No luck.
At this point, I moved over to a second kiosk to start the process again.  But again the software could not read my passport. On to a third kiosk. This time it appeared to read the passport page with the barcode. Quite a bit of time elapsed before I received a screen message saying that I was not a registered Global Entry user and therefore could not use the kiosk. This clearly was in error. (I had registered for Global Entry two years ago)
Growing more annoyed by the minute, I then moved on to a fourth kiosk. At long last, success! The passport was read and accessed the database where my Trusted Traveler information was stored. The system also recognized the flight on which I had just flown back to the U.S. At this point, the system asks the same questions that one encounters on the paper Customs form. These include: Are you carrying more than $10,000 in cash? Are you bringing fruits and vegetables into the country? One nice touch is that it allows you to select the “No” button if all of the answers to the questions are No.  When the form is filed out, it appears on the screen with the user’s passport photo on top. If all of the information is correct, you touch the Print button and the paper customs declaration slides out of a slot in the kiosk.
I then took the form to a customs official who stamped and then retained it. I asked him if my experience with the many unreliable kiosks was normal or an aberration. He assured me that my frustrating experience was par for the course.  Note: the majority of users who had experienced similar problems had given up and moved over to the long line to fill out a paper declaration and have the CBP official examine and stamp it.
Attempts to reach personnel at the US Customs and Border Patrol have so far proven unsuccessful. Without proper maintenance on these units, the future does not bode well.
The numbers of passengers who quickly gave up trying to use the kiosk and went directly to the regular customs line was disheartening. It’s a sad commentary on a once-impressive (and easy to use) kiosk deployment that had really provided Service to the Citizen.

Global Entry Kiosks More Info




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Self-Order Solutions Take Center Stage at Restaurant Show

Self-Order Solutions Take Center Stage at Restaurant Show

Kiosks are quickly becoming an integral part of the QSR and fast-casual space. Here are some factors to consider when planning for a self-order solution by Olea Kiosks, Inc.

The 99th annual National Restaurant Association trade show wrapped up its four-day run May 22, but one of the hottest topics of the event wasn’t food. It was technology.

Mobile order and pay garnered quite a bit of attention, as did product vending solutions. One of the real stars of the show, however, was self-order kiosk technology thanks to their demonstrated ability to increase customer throughput and increase sales by automating suggestive selling.

Still, it’s not enough for a restaurant operator to just install a kiosk near the counter and wait for the orders to roll in. The design of the kiosk itself goes a long way toward encouraging customers to use the devices. In conjunction though the restaurant needs to ensure kitchen output matches up with kitchen input.  Bakery café chain Panera Bread updated their kitchens first and then added kiosks and multi-channel ordering. The objective is more orders taken and fulfilled, faster.

There’s little doubt that self-order kiosks will be an central component of the QSR and fast-casual restaurant landscape going forward. McDonald’s expects to have self-order kiosks in most of its 14,000 restaurants by 2020, while Wendy’s currently has them in many of its 6,500-plus locations. Other fast-food operations are following suit, creating their own variations best-suited for their restaurant environments. More compact and less costly designs that are cost-effective to deploy are starting to become commonplace.

On the fast-casual side, Panera made self-order kiosks an integral part of its “Panera 2.0” effort, which it began rolling out in 2014. Before the company was taken private last year, officials indicated that sales increases at restaurants outfitted with the initiative were outpacing sales at those without the technology.

It’s evident that these companies and others wouldn’t be investing millions of dollars in self-order technology unless it had been proven to offer tangible benefits. To maximize those benefits, though, deployers should take a few critical factors into consideration when planning to incorporate self-order kiosks into their operations.

The user interface

Key to encouraging customers to use self-order kiosks on a regular basis is a clean, simple user interface. The order flow must be intuitive and easy to navigate. Choices should be presented logically, with similar items on the same page and accompanied by professionally shot images. Add-ons should be suggested where appropriate. Also, it should be easy for the customer to go back and make changes if they decide on a different selection.

Enclosure & mounting

It’s likely that some customers will need some degree of education to encourage them to use a self-order kiosk. For freestanding kiosks, the enclosure and attractor screen should include messaging that illustrates the kiosk’s purpose. Tablet-based kiosks should consist of nearby signage along with the attractor screen inviting users to bypass the line.

More importantly, self-order kiosks need to be compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Are the devices usable by someone in a wheelchair? What about a blind or visually impaired customer?  Accessible by all should be ensured.

The last thing a restaurant deploying self-order kiosks wants is to be branded with the reputation that they don’t care about the disabled.  On the flip side, the disabled will likely be a growing customer base if you support ADA.  When it comes to self-order kiosks, ADA compliance is a minefield best navigated with the assistance of an experienced kiosk vendor, and possibly your legal department.

Service & support

A kiosk is a collection of electronic components and as with any such device it will eventually need service, whether that be a simple cleaning or the replacement of a part. Can the unit be serviced easily and with a minimum of effort? Can parts be swapped out quickly, keeping downtime to a minimum?

Just as important, does the kiosk vendor offer phone support to assist deployers with service issues by phone, and service programs designed to resolve problems quickly when a site visit is required

The rest of the operation

One of the main reasons a restaurant operator will consider deploying a self-order kiosk is to alleviate congestion at the counter and increase order throughput. The misconception that self-order kiosks will help cut labor is just that: a misconception. Many restaurants that have deployed self-order kiosks reported an increase in sales, requiring more, not fewer employees to accommodate this influx.

However, increasing the rate at which orders arrive at the kitchen creates another problem. If the kitchen can’t keep up, the result will be long ticket times, crowding by the food pickup area, and ultimately, dissatisfied customers. People tend to order more when they order from the computer as well (25% more).

Consider, for example, the experience encountered by Starbucks when it released a mobile ordering app in 2015. The app led to a flood of orders, which in turn led to congestion at the drink hand-off area. Furthermore, many customers came in, saw the long lines, and naturally turned around and left.

To solve the issue, Starbuck’s added employees and implemented new systems that enabled stores to handle the additional orders. When Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurants faced similar problems, they began implementing a second make line devoted solely to digital orders.

How restaurants handle orders coming in via self-order kiosks will likely be determined by customer flow and the design of the store itself. This could translate to different kiosk form factors being needed.

Much like anything else, a best practice is to train employees on how to utilize the kiosks.  This is made much easier by deploying a kiosk that utilizes the same components used in the restaurants already. Still, training is important.

Think of it this way: If a restaurant installed a new point-of-sale system, they would train each employee on how to use it. Kiosks are no different. Employees should know how to direct traffic to the kiosks during rush hour properly, and how to service the units in a timely manner.

If employees recognize kiosks as a tool for them to use, rather than their competition, it is likely the devices will produce a much faster return on investment.  Employees will be more willing to push customers to the kiosks, generating more usage and increasing average ticket size.

———–

At the end of the day the best way to provide a self-order solution that improves the guest experience, simplifies the restaurant operation, and increases sales is to work with a kiosk vendor who is experienced in the deployment of self-order kiosks and has a track record of success. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

 

Check-in kiosk
Click for full size – courtesy Olea Kiosk, Inc.

The Austin Kiosk from Olea Kiosks, for example, is a versatile solution available in multiple form factors so deployers can choose the one that best suits their needs. The kiosk is available in countertop, wall mount, and freestanding versions – all utilizing the exact same components to ensure that customers are always greeted with the same technology.

The Austin uses familiar POS components such as Elo Touch Solutions, Epson and STAR Micronics-brand printers, and industry-favorite Ingenico and Verifone EMV payment terminals.

For more information call 800.927.8063 or send an email to [email protected]




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5 Technology Trends Spotted at The NRA Show 2018

5 Technology Trends Spotted at The NRA Show 2018

With another successful year at the National Restaurant Association Show under our belts (our 13th!), we gathered the most talked about technology trends from the show to share – just in case you missed it…

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1. Third-party delivery replacement

Restaurant operators have come across many issues with third-party delivery companies: loss of brand value, high commission cost, data usage, etc. That’s why companies like ShiftPixystood out this year as a self-delivery option that allows clients to use their own employees to make deliveries.

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2. The Touchscreen Drive-Thru

Self-order isn’t limited to the indoor variety: meet the self-order drive-thru. The Touchscreen Drive-Thru introduces huge operational efficiencies, allowing chains to redirect labor full-tilt towards fulfillment. Not to mention, the technology has been refined over the course of a decade: “NEXTEP SYSTEMS displayed its fifth generation, drive-thru self-order kiosk, which automatically adjusts the center of the touchscreen to the height of the customer in their car. The touchscreen adjusts as soon as the customer touches it. The system also automatically adjusts the brightness of the touchscreen to the level of outdoor light. Additionally, the kiosk includes a built-in air conditioning unit.” (Kiosk Marketplace)

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3. Food at faster speeds

It was all about speed in terms of fulfillment this year. Devices that prepare food in seconds like the Antunes JS-1000 Steamer, which can make scrambled eggs in 12 seconds, gave operators something exciting to look forward to: less wait time for customers.

4. Giving customers the reigns

Self-order menus with endless custom options are giving customers the control they crave. Whether because of dietary restrictions or particular preferences, guests are able to seamlessly create the perfect, customized meal in a few taps with NEXTEP kiosks. This year, it was clearer than ever that self-order design matters. Many POS companies jumped at the chance to say they could offer self-order, but very few were able to execute kiosk software that looks beautiful, answers guests’ questions before they even have to ask, and works seamlessly with the rest of the operation.

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5. Going digital for streamlined operations

Digitally-enhanced self-service has taken over not just as a way to order, but in every aspect of the restaurant experience. The Coca-Cola Freestyle 9100, for example, was debuted this year with new features that create an interactive experience for users.  Users can download the Freestyle mobile app, connect to the machine via Bluetooth, and pour their own beverage mix from their phone.

More Pictures from NRA




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Benefits of Utilizing Self-Service Kiosks in Quick Service & Fast Casual

Benefits of Utilizing  Self-Service Kiosks in Quick  Service & Fast Casual

May 2018  |  www.frankmayer.com

self-service order kiosk for mcdonalds
Click for full size

The following is excerpt from the latest whitepaper by Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. covering Self-Service Kiosks in Quick Service and Fast Casual.  See the complete whitepaper on the Frank Mayer website.

Contents

  • Forward
  • Enhanced Customer Service
  • Improved Productivity
  • Increased Profits
  • Conclusion
  • Resources

Forward

Recent industry news pertaining to quick service restaurants (QSRs) and fast casual establishments has shined a spotlight on a growing trend in both sectors – the desire to enhance the customer experience through digital measures.

Included among the numerous digital options has been the growth of self-service kiosks where customers independently order food and pay using a touchscreen versus placing an order to a cashier behind a register.

In the April 2018 Restaurant Readiness IndexTM by PYMNTS.com in collaboration with Bypass and Bank of America Merchant Services, 41 percent of restaurant participants surveyed regarding 2017 Q4 data indicated they had implemented in-store kiosks, a four percent increase over the previous quarter. Kiosks were also the in-store feature that represented the greatest improvement since the previous study, showcasing the steady momentum behind restaurants incorporating self-order kiosk programs into their growth plans.

There are many advantages to QSRs and fast casuals adopting self-order strategies, but three well-documented beneits include enhanced customer service, improved productivity and increased profits. The solid growth and attractive benefits of self-service kiosks means we’ll continue to see our favorite QSRs and fast casual restaurants set themselves apart from the competition.

See the complete whitepaper on the Frank Mayer website.

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McDonalds Kiosk Effect dominates NRA Show

McDonalds Effect dominates NRA Show – Exhibitor Gallery from KMC

 

The number of self-order kiosks on display at the National Restaurant Show nearly tripled over last year’s exhibits.  Below is video of Pyramid Computer booth. Visit their YouTube channel for more!


Good review of self-order kiosks at NRA 2018.  Elliott presents photo gallery of 35 different booths at the recent National Restaurant Show.

See the gallery article: KioskMarketplace and Elliott Maras

There were some notable not presents such as Acrelec and RedyRef.

Given the recent spate of RFPs related to fast casual it is not surprising to see big turnout though at this show.  Still,  the media always gets ahead of itself trying to announce “what’s coming” is the same as “what is” and it rarely is.

The Ziosk iteration went from concept to installment over many years and it is a relatively mature product now entering its replacement cycle.  Lifecycle coming into play for the units.

Still, it has been several years of “they are coming” and last time I checked at Wendy’s there is nothing, or any of the other fast casuals here in the area and we are looking at a fairly “hot” market here in Denver.

Companies are certainly exploring the idea.  Which format or form factor they eventually settle on is still to be determined.

Excerpt:  

What a difference a year makes! Last year’s National Restaurant Show featured 12 self-serve kiosks. This year, the number on display at Chicago’s McCormick Place nearly tripled as kiosk manufacturers scrambled to meet the restaurant industry’s demand to improve customer service with new technology.

As McDonald’s continues its nationwide rollout of self-order kiosks, thousands of QSRs and fast casual restaurants don’t want to get left behind and are shopping the market.

Click here for more: KioskMarketplace Gallery

McDonalds Kiosks news items

  • ZIVELO Wins Two Awards at ICX Summit 2018/06/14 ZIVELO Wins 2 Awards at ICX Summit for Achievement in Interactive Customer Experiences. The #1 QSR mobile kiosk company receives two awards Dallas, TX – June 13, 2018 – ZIVELO, the leader in interactive self-service kiosk and digital signage solutions in the QSR arena, has been appointed to receive two prestigious awards at the ICX Summit in ...
  • Drive Thru Kiosk Solutions – Real World 2018/06/10 Drive Thru Kiosk Solutions From Steve Evans and Nextep Hello all! It’s been pretty busy but I wanted to stop for a moment and congratulate the following 5 locations for their implementations of our World’s Fastest Drive Thru™ Solution: • Bennett Holdings Group – #10199 Johnstown, PA • Kristen Chandler – #68779 Midland, TX • Russell Rogers – #50511 Bentonville, AR • ...
  • Feature – EMV Self-Service Update for Self-Order Kiosks 2018 2018/06/10 EMV Update for Self-Order Kiosks EMV deadlines have arrived, but many choose to skip the upgrade. EMV is still split into two big camps. One that is compliant and the other which will  be, but not yet.   Our prime supporting sponsor for this update is KioWare. Thanks! By Richard Slawsky contributor Which costs more, complying with new regulations or ...
  • Wendy’s CEO Talks About Kiosks, Drive-Thrus & Future of Fast Food – The Street 2018/06/10 Wendy’s CEO Talks About Future of Fast Food – Kiosks and Drive-Thrus – The Street TheStreet talks exclusively with Wendy’s CEO Todd Penegor about how he is trying to reinvent the food ordering process. Click here for full interview. Below are some of the points covered.Some points covered and made by Penegor:How many installed?  200 in ...
  • Self-Order Solutions Take Center Stage at Restaurant Show 2018/06/08 Self-Order Solutions Take Center Stage at Restaurant Show Kiosks are quickly becoming an integral part of the QSR and fast-casual space. Here are some factors to consider when planning for a self-order solution by Olea Kiosks, Inc. The 99th annual National Restaurant Association trade show wrapped up its four-day run May 22, but one of the hottest ...
  • McDonald’s CEO: We are evolving the business in a meaningful way 2018/06/08 McDonald’s CEO: We are evolving the business in a meaningful way9:00 AM ET Mon, 4 June 2018 In a wide-ranging interview, Steve Easterbrook, McDonald’s CEO talks about the company’s new headquarters, adapting new technology, including new ways to order food, adding an international menu, and why tariffs are unlikely to impact the company’s bottom..McDonald’s CEO: We ...
  • Benefits of Utilizing Self-Service Kiosks in Quick Service & Fast Casual 2018/05/31 Benefits of Utilizing  Self-Service Kiosks in Quick  Service & Fast Casual May 2018  |  www.frankmayer.com The following is excerpt from the latest whitepaper by Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. covering Self-Service Kiosks in Quick Service and Fast Casual.  See the complete whitepaper on the Frank Mayer website. ContentsForward Enhanced Customer Service Improved Productivity Increased Profits Conclusion ResourcesForward Recent industry news pertaining to quick service restaurants (QSRs) and ...
  • McDonalds Kiosk Effect dominates NRA Show 2018/05/31The number of self-order kiosks on display at the National Restaurant Show nearly tripled over last year’s exhibits as hardware and software manufacturers rushed to meet the demand from restaurants. Source: www.fastcasual.com Good review of self-order kiosks at NRA 2018.   Excerpt:   What a difference a year makes! ...
  • QSR Ordering Kiosks And Out-Of-Stock Shoes 2018/05/10 From Pymnts.com article QSR Ordering Kiosks Evolved From A 1980s Solution For Out-Of-Stock Shoes As a college student in the 1970s, Murray Lappe heard that his fellow students wanted to promote their organizations through a new medium. During a retreat, the students thought of having a traditional bulletin board, but Lappe had an alternate take: Why not ...
  • The rise of the machine: Stores and restaurants turn to self-service kiosks – 2018/05/04 Self-service kiosks at McDonalds restaurants are part of a national trend toward automation at stores and restaurants driven by tech-savvy consumers and the ri… Source: buffalonews.com Nice article. The rise of the machine: Stores and restaurants turn to self-service kiosks
  • McDonalds Kiosk – Great Falls Montana Video 2018/04/24 McDonalds Kiosk – Great Falls Montana Video   Self-serve kiosks are making their debut in the fast food industry! The recently renovated 10th Ave. McDonald’s here in Great Falls has just added self-serving kiosks to their menu.  Instead of 3 places to order, there are now 8 in the newly designed restaurant. In an effort to offer a better ...
  • Hospitality Kiosks – What the Kiosk Can Do for Hotels and Restaurants 2018/03/16What The $1B Kiosk Industry Can Do For Hotels And Restaurants News followup from Pymnts.com https://www.pymnts.com/news/retail/2018/self-order-digital-kiosk-customer-experience/ Excerpt:Kiosks aren’t just for selling tickets or providing customers with another way to order a meal. They can personalize the guest experience too. “Our take on it is that we’re all different,” Bite CPO Steven Truong has said. “Our recognition and learning algorithm ...
  • McDonald’s tech updates have some workers jumping ship 2018/03/14 For Dudley Dickerson, the mobile-app orders were the last straw.McDonald’s has been updating with new technology, delivery, a revamped menu and curbside pickup. But the “Experience of the Future” has employees handling more tasks — in many cases, they say, without pay raises or adequate staffing. So Dickerson, 23, handed over his spatula for the ...
  • McDonald’s: More touch screens and table service just the beginning of change – Nov. 17, 2016 2018/03/13 McDonald’sCEO Steve Easterbrook says the fast food giant is rolling out self-order kiosks, mobile pay options, an updated interior design, even table service. Source: money.cnn.com
  • Habit to Test Breakfast, Develop App, Kiosks | Orange County Business Journal 2018/03/02 Habit Restaurants Inc. (Nasdaq: HABT) in Irvine will test breakfast menu items and develop a digital mobile app and a kiosk ordering system. Source: www.ocbj.com Other restaurant groups—including Irvine-based Yogurtland—have looked at the meal segment as well, as a way to get more customers through the door while morning-intensive chains such as Starbucks Corp. made a mirror-image ...



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Kiosk Manufacturer – Meridian Celebrates Decade of Kiosk Software Development

Meridian Celebrates a Decade of Kiosk Software Development

Aberdeen, N.C. –  May 23, 2018 – Meridian, an industry leading kiosk manufacturer and kiosk software developer, is celebrating its 10th year of developing kiosk driven software. “Manufacturing our own kiosks and developing our own software has brought tremendous value to our customers,” said Meridian Founder and CEO, Chris Gilder. “We’re able to provide them with a seamless solution and guide them through each step of the process.”

kiosk manufacturer kiosk softwareMeridian’s kiosk software solutions include a secure browser software platform, remote kiosk management software, a software development kit and a suite of off-the-shelf software solutions. “Our software suite is designed and developed to create a cohesive experience for our clients and provide a better solution for their users,” Said Paul Burden, Director of Software at Meridian.

Meridian’s MzeroPlatform serves as the foundation that all of Meridian’s software solutions are built on top of. As a standalone product, MzeroPlatform functions as a secure kiosk browser allowing companies to deploy web based kiosks with web applications and URL whitelisting and blacklisting.

Meridian’s remote management software, MzeroManage, is designed to manage multiple kiosks from remote locations. “MzeroManage is Ideal for businesses requiring system security and remote performance management,” said Gilder. The remote management tool allows businesses to remotely access their kiosks to monitor health, customize alerts and run diagnostic reports and analytics.

MzeroCreate is Meridian’s proprietary Software Development Kit (SDK), which provides a suite of developer tools that allow full customization of Mzero Platform. The SDK is designed with development modules, allowing users to develop kiosk applications that integrate with pre-integrated kiosk components. Integrated components include scanners, cameras, payment devices, dispensing devices and more. “MzeroCreate provides software developers with the environment to quickly and efficiently develop and deploy compelling solutions,” said Gilder.

Over the last decade, MzeroCreate has been utilized to develop kiosk applications for some of the biggest names in the retail, automotive, insurance, and higher education industries. “We collaborated with Meridian to leverage their SDK. We used MzeroCreate to build a scalable, consistent, and exceptional software program that successfully supports our global kiosk deployments for our OEM clients, ” said Todd Marcelle, CEO and Co-Founder of GoMoto.

Meridian’s existing software infrastructure has allowed the company to develop a full suite of off-the-shelf kiosk software solutions. The suite includes MzeroPay bill payment, MzeroInterAct digital signage and MzeroDirectMe directory solutions. Meridian’s off-the-shelf solutions have been deployed in various locations across the country, including airports, town centers and corporate buildings.

To learn more about Meridian’s kiosk software solutions, visit meridiankiosks.com.




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In the Wild – King Sooper City Market Scan Bag Go – CheckOut Kiosk

In the Wild – King Sooper City Market Scan Bag Go Checkout Kiosk

We stopped by our friendly King Soopers off 120th today for a green matcha tea at Starbucks ($9 showed on mobile app as available) and at the front door were greeted by Scan Bag Go.  City Market has installed these first two out by Boulder where we live.

Seemed pretty easy to do.  We’re going to work up a grocery list and put it to the test.  Vegetables, paper coupons, online coupons and anything else we can throw at it.

Click for full size
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Scan Bag Go Kiosk
Click for full size

Here is an earlier article on the City Market deployment where we guessed as the design and manufacture as Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. We checked the manufacturer tag on the back and sure enough we were right.

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Opinion – Digital Is Experience, Not Technology

Digital experiences shouldn’t be about technology, they need to be about the experience itself

Acquired Digital Neil Farr
Click to visit Neil’s LinkedIn profile

By Neil Farr, Managing Director, Acquire Digital – www.acquiredigital.com  and the article is republished with permission from Kiosk Solutions Magazine

It’s hard to believe but when I started my working life in 1991 for an A/V company, it was ground-breaking that we moved from a bank of slide projectors to having a single computer and a projector to show presentations.

For a meeting with a client, we had to use printed maps to get there, and had to stop to ask directions or to find a telephone box to call the client to say we were lost and may be late. Videos were grainy, and VHS tape and even broadcast quality video had problems. But back then, everyone thought it was an amazing time to be alive with all of this technology available.

Later, we started using the presentations in retail stores on big old TVs, using slow 14.4Kbps dial up modems to show in-store TV that we could update remotely (albeit slowly). And then, we realised we could also use the same technology with a touchscreen on the front of the monitor in a box to provide loyalty schemes, or targeted coupon delivery and endless aisles.

Everything then changed – a thing called the World Wide Web appeared, and people could see reams of text and occasionally singing, dancing hamsters appear on their computer screens – so long bulletin boards.

People then realised that we needed a faster way to get the dancing hamsters to our screens, and the speed of the internet went up – faster and faster.

Consoles appeared, and people who didn’t sit at computer desks put them under their televisions in the lounge where the whole family discovered entertainment could be more than simply watching VHS tapes, and could actually be interactive. This led to needing faster and better Internet connections as people were demanding better multimedia and videos and didn’t like reading reams of text on the web.

Head first into digital

interactive digitalTechnology continued on a pace with a new solutions and features making most industries play catch-up, or trying to have a newer and better features themselves. The thing was, the public’s appetite for
this new digital age and what could be delivered could never be sated.

Then a company who had been making one of the most popular devices capable of not needing to stop at phone boxes to ask directions – Nokia – announced to the world that the Internet was now truly mobile too with their WAP-capable 7110 phone. But when people realised WAP wasn’t quite as good as their home computer at accessing well, pretty much anything. But they still liked the idea of having a handheld device that removed the need to carry around a diary, notepad, music player, games console and more. They tried device after device known as a PDA which promised to do all this. Shortly after, a company called Apple released a miniature computer, with a touchscreen that did anything you could possibly think of, including accessing the Internet wirelessly, and didn’t need a ‘geek’ to make it work, so people bought it.

In turn, Internet Service Providers made the internet faster, and able to store more information, and now also had to make it accessible wirelessly. The people who had something to put on the web could now put more videos and graphics and information there, and now the public could access that when they wanted to. All this meant that the Website owners had to contend with visitors with a shorter and shorter attention span. Also, now there was a cool place where you could keep videos, as well as ways that people could share social experiences, and links to those videos, too.

With the dancing Hamsters’ now ignored as a wealth of videos showing skiing ostriches, skilful ball trick shots and other seemingly home-created videos, using those now much more advanced mobile phones to film them, have filled the shared social media channels. People realised that the videos could be shared around like a common cold and become Viral.

With all of that technology and media and data, it wasn’t long before the owners of ‘real’ environments got worried – would people still visit their stores when they could access websites instead? So, in their bricks and mortar world, they installed screens with videos that played adverts and occasionally provided computers with Internet access so customers could still get their online appetite sated – the plan was typically to get the customer to just check out the web version of the shop they were in.

Technology has continued to advance where it’s almost impossible to keep up with the latest developments, as well as know what will be adopted, and what will become an unused quirk of technology only remembered in Wiki articles by occasional researchers in the future.

Predicting patterns in usage

Realising this, other people started getting the computers to track what people are doing in more detail and called it ‘big data’. They even built supercomputers and together with programs that adapt their own rules to learn, they use them to help with looking for trends and patterns in how people int eract with the various forms of technology.

By making technology to ensure people are tracked in the ‘real’ world, this meant that those people can try out something and almost instantly measure the reaction. The results of this can then be used along with our natural inquisitiveness to become more engaged with one thing over the millions of others they could engage with.

In the digital age, advancements in the technology as demonstrated at trade shows every year, tend to drive the Zeitgeist – go on, use the smartphone you probably own to look up what that word means – and then realise that by doing so, you have contributed to it.

Making life easier

While writing this article I intentionally chose to use generic words like ‘people’ when I could to make it appropriate for different vertical markets. The writing style and the content itself was carefully chosen. So I can now make some assumptions about the type of person you are, and how much I can sway your opinions to ones that I think are beneficial to us both.

Do you, reading this article, consider the paper or the screen technology you are viewing it on? Or the Internet that made it possible for me to write it and send it to the publisher?

The fact is that in 1991 when none of this was around and no one other than one man had considered what the Internet could be used for, yet now over 3.2 billion people are connected to it – over 50% of the world’s population – didn’t happen because of the technology. It happened because of what people do with technology. And the success will be measured by the experience of what they interact with – what the experience was like, does it make their lives easier, does it save them (precious) time? Does it become an experience they expect in future, or simply one they can live without?

Throughout the world, people like you and me are working hard to build a solution that will be a success and become part of modern life for people. We can’t control whether it will be a success or  forgotten, but by thinking of the people who will interact with it and what they experience, it’s at least more likely to be a success.




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