Category Archives: Touchscreen Technology

Hand Sensor Patent by Google for Touchless Touch Moves Ahead

Source article on Reuters

Touchless Touch

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google unit won approval from U.S. regulators to deploy a radar-based motion sensing device known as Project Soli.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said in an order late on Monday that it would grant Google a waiver to operate the Soli sensors at higher power levels than currently allowed. The FCC said the sensors can also be operated aboard aircraft.

The FCC said the decision “will serve the public interest by providing for innovative device control features using touchless hand gesture technology.”

A Google spokeswoman did not immediately comment on Tuesday, citing the New Year’s Day holiday.

The FCC said the Soli sensor captures motion in a three-dimensional space using a radar beam to enable touchless control of functions or features that can benefit users with mobility or speech impairments.

Google says the sensor can allow users to press an invisible button between the thumb and index fingers or a virtual dial that turns by rubbing a thumb against the index finger.

Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) team has been working on Project Soli since 2015. The gesture-based system uses broad beam radar to detect and capture hand movements, turning them into commands for mobile devices. Until now, though, the tech has been restricted, with some companies — including Facebook — claiming that the high frequency levels required might interfere with existing technology. Now, the FCC has granted a waiver that will allow Soli to operate at higher levels than currently allowed, and therefore continue development as Google originally intended.

Touchscreens – TDS Adds New “38” Line of PCap Touchscreens

TDSTOUCH-38 series, with sizes ranging from 10.1 to 55 inches, adopts widescreen HD LED LCD screen multipoint projected capacitive touch screen and terraced front frame structure, is an open frame touch display specially designed for KIOSK/ digital signage/ console and other self-service equipment to the integrator market.

TDS Touchscreen

Cover treatment:

  • Brightness customization offered a range from 500-1000 nits
  • Providing privacy filter / anti-glare and more extended functions according to the use environment

Constomers can choose to purchase our touch screen as AD displays alone, touch panel can be reduced and the cost as well.

 PCAP Touchscreen Features:

  • Smooth Human-Machine Interaction
  • Smooth Handwriting
  • Fast response
  • Projected Captive touch screen/10 touch point
  • Humanized anti-fingerprint

Physical Characteristics:

  • Easy installation
  • Variety modes of immobilization: can from side, up and down, behind different directions of assembly.
  • Well sealed: Sturdy and durable
  • Bench type front frame design; Cabinet surface
  • Front frame stage style seamless connection
  • Sealed with touch screen frame/waterproof /dustproof
  • 3MM touch cover plate passed through the intensive treatment
  • UL65090 standard

Touchscreen News – US TDS Touch Introduces Fanless PCAP Touchscreen

Touchscreen News – US TDS Touch Introduces Fanless PCAP Touchscreen

PCAP TouchscreenUS TDS Touch introducing a 700-1500 NIT fanless series of open PCAP touchscreen display modules with ultra-low power consumption and automatic ambient light. Sizes range from 10.1 inches to 32 inches. The overall module is highly integrated with modular design, high resolution, high contrast, high brightness, and greatly enhances the layering of the picture.

PCAP Touchscreen Product Features:

  • Ultra-high brightness industrial grade LED backlight, integrated heat sink structure, stable and energy saving
  • The front panel is flat, IP65 standard, waterproof and dustproof. Brushed with aluminum profile metal, light
    and compact, changing the appearance of traditional high-brightness modules
  • The backlight uses industrial grade components, intelligent constant temperature, automatic ambient light
    perception, high reliability, good stability, automatic brightness adjustment, energy saving and environmental
    protection, especially suitable for working in harsh environments
  • The 10-point PCAP touch screen adopts a 3MM cover plate with a hardness of 7H, and the surface is anti-glare and tempered. Insulation and riot, anti-purple line. The image is clearly visible and suitable for public
    applications in semi-outdoor or unattended environment
  • Industrial grade UL certified power adapter for high temperature protection, surge protection, leakage
    protection, over-voltage protection
  • Highly expandable structure, back VASEB hole position 75X75MM, 100X100MM two group hole position, can be used with OPS host and MINIBOX
  • Customized open-end highlighting machine for Android system and Windows system

Layer Logic and TSItouch Join Forces to Drive Demand of Touchscreen Displays in the Enterprise

Layer Logic and TSItouch Join Forces on Touchscreen Displays in Enterprise

touchscreen display
August 14, 2018 – Mason, OH and Uniontown, PA Layer Logic® Inc., a company dedicated to making collaboration seamless and spontaneous, and TSItouch, a leading manufacturer of touch screen and protective solutions for commercial grade displays and video walls announced they are partnering together to drive more touch display demand through the delivery of additional features and capabilities.
CoreTouch® is an award-winning intelligent appliance that allows users to connect and simultaneously control up to four devices on a single touchscreen display. Up until now, it has not been possible to connect multiple sources, such as PC’s, Macs, tablet devices, etc. to a display, and control those sources from the monitor itself. CoreTouch is the first of its kind – making group collaboration simple when it comes to
displaying, sharing and controlling content specific to a source. CoreTouch also supports the new annotation capabilities of Microsoft’s Office Suite, allowing for annotation from the monitor over live applications like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint as well as whiteboarding.
“Combining the CoreTouch appliance with our touchscreen solutions provides for increased utilization of these interactive displays,” commented Gary Mundrake, President at TSItouch. “This improves the value proposition and ROI of room designs in a time when customers are demanding broader usage of their meeting rooms.”
“Driving additional features and capabilities through touch displays will result in additional demand and sales,” commented Rich Reiss, CEO at Layer Logic. “And with the Layer Logic mobile app, we can reduce or eliminate the need for expensive control systems – freeing up more budget to design rooms and spaces in new and creative ways. We believe our partnership with TSItouch will result in benefits for both our channel partners and end user community.”
About Layer Logic
Layer Logic develops unique collaboration solutions for conference and huddle rooms that enable any user in the
room to switch presenters, change on-screen layouts, and control content and sources from their smartphone, tablet,
PC or an Interactive Flat Panel.
About TSItouch
TSItouch is a manufacturer of touch screen and protective solutions for commercial grade displays and video walls
that is dedicated to consistently providing our customers with high quality, cost-effective products and services.
TSItouch is an employee-owned business located in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. TSItouch was established as an
independent company in 2011.
Contact:
Layer Logic:
Kelly Harman
VP of Marketing
703-505-3133
TSItouch:
Justin Fuss
Creative Director
724-871-7230

TDS Products – See New Lineup at DSE 2018

 TDS Touch New Products at DSE

TDS Touch Screens
Click for full size. This is just a sample of whats new.

TDS will be attending DSE-2018 show as an exhibitor, our Booth No#1854, we will prepare below products in this show:

 
1. TDS-38B&38C Open-Frame Touch Monitor (17″, 19″, 18.5″, 21.5″& 23.8″)
2. TDS-20C Touch AIO for Digital Signage (10.1″, 15.6″, 18.5″, 21.5″, 23.8″)
3. TDS-3220D AIO for Digital Signage (31.5″ 10-Points PCAP)
4. TDS-4339C Open-Frame Touch Monitor (43″, 10-Points PCAP)
5. TDS-5520D Touch AIO for Digital Signage (55″, 2000 High-brightness, 10-Points PCAP)
6. TDS-5520D Touch AIO for Digital Signage (55″, Project IR Touch, slim IR design)
For Open-Frame Touch Monitor, we have 3-year warranty,  for Digital Signage and big-size touch products, we supply 1-year warranty.

For More TDS Touch Information

To find out more about TDS information, please go to www.ustdstouch.com, or call the office.

Continue reading TDS Products – See New Lineup at DSE 2018

3M Files Patent Infringement Against Elo Touch Solutions

Source link

3M Files Lawsuit to Enforce Its Patent Rights in Metal Mesh Conductor TechnologyUsed in Touch Screens

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–3M and 3M Innovative Properties Co. filed a patent infringement lawsuit in federal district court in Wilmington, Del., today against Elo Touch Solutions Inc.

“3M strives to provide its customers with the most innovative materials and solutions for their products. The company is committed to protecting its investments in research and development for projected capacitive technology and vigorously defends its intellectual property rights”

The suit alleges that certain Elo Touch projected capacitive products infringe 3M’s U.S. Patents 8,179,381, 8,274,494, 8,704,799 and 9,823,786.

Metal mesh conductor technology is widely used in the construction of projected capacitive touch sensors for consumer and commercial applications. Metal mesh conductors have broad applicability across touch sensors of all sizes, in particular, large-format touch sensors often utilized in interactive whiteboards, conferencing systems, casino gaming machines, digital signage displays, and fast-food self-ordering systems.

“3M strives to provide its customers with the most innovative materials and solutions for their products. The company is committed to protecting its investments in research and development for projected capacitive technology and vigorously defends its intellectual property rights,” said Makoto Ishii, vice president and general manager, 3M Display Materials and Systems Division.

Learn more about 3M Touch Solutions at www.3M.com/touch.

About 3M
At 3M, we apply science in collaborative ways to improve lives daily. With $30 billion in sales, our 90,000 employees connect with customers all around the world. Learn more about 3M’s creative solutions to the world’s problems at www.3M.com or on Twitter @3M or @3MNews.

Contacts

3M Media Contact:
Lori Anderson, 651-733-0831


Notes

Here is the actual complaint — ELO-3M-04313848846

Here are the patents involved:

Best Practice – Are All Touchscreens Created Equal?

Are All Touchscreens Created Equal?

Reprinted from TheLab by Olea

Interactive touchscreens come in several varieties. Here’s a quick overview of the types and the applications to which each is best suited.

Although interactive touchscreens have been around in one form or another since the late 1970s, over the past 10 years or so they’ve become an integral part of our lives.

In fact, thanks to the iPhone, tablet computers and similar devices, we’ve become accustomed to the idea that we should be able to touch the screens we see and get a reaction. Interactive touchscreens are a central feature of devices ranging from ATMs to wayfinding kiosks to the photo kiosks common in drugstores around the country.

A Research and Markets study valued the size of the interactive display market at $9.9 billion in 2015, with that market estimated to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 15.5 percent over the next five years, reaching $26.9 billion by 2022.

Interactive displays include a variety of technologies, though, and not every technology is suited to every application.

Stacking them up

According to the industry trade publication Control Design, there are five main types of touchscreens: resistive touch, infrared touch, surface capacitive, surface acoustical wave and projected capacitive. Each has its advantages, disadvantages and applications for which it is best suited.

A resistive touchscreen is made up of several thin layers, including two electrically resistive layers facing each other with a thin gap between. When the top layer is touched, the two layers connect and the screen detects the position of that touch.

“Resistive touch is a very old technology that some companies still offer as their go-to,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“It works great in places with dust and grease, such as fast food restaurants, and its low price point can make it attractive for those with a limited budget,” Olea said. “I personally don’t care for it because it makes the image on the screen appear hazy and it wears out over time.”

In addition, resistive-touch screens are unable to perform the multitouch functions that are becoming increasingly popular.

For very large displays, infrared touch is the most common application. Instead of a sandwich of screens, infrared touchscreens use IR emitters and receivers to create an invisible grid of beams across the display surface. When an object such as a finger interrupts the grid, sensors on the display are able to locate the exact point.

Advantages of infrared touch are excellent image quality and a long life, and they work great for gesture-based applications. In addition, scratches on the screen itself won’t affect functionality. In many cases, touch capability can be added to a display through the use of a third-party overlay placed on the existing screen.

On the downside, infrared touchscreens are susceptible to accidental activation and malfunctions due to dirt or grease buildup. They’re also not suited to outdoor applications. In addition, while adding an overlay is a relatively quick way to convert a large display into a touchscreen, extra care must be taken in mounting that overlay to ensure touches match the image displayed on the screen.

Surface capacitive screens have a connective coating applied to the front surface and a small voltage is applied to each corner. Touching the screen creates a voltage drop, with sensors on the screen using that drop to pinpoint the location of that touch. Advantages of surface capacitive technology include low cost and a resistance to environmental factors, while disadvantages include an inability to withstand heavy use and a lack of multitouch capability. Those screens are also limited to finger touches; the technology won’t work if the user is wearing gloves. DVD rental company Redbox uses surface capacitive screens in their kiosks.

The promise of multitouch

Other types of touchscreen tech offer the potential of more complicated functions thanks to their ability to sense several touches at the same time. Multitouch applications might include functions performed with two or more fingers, such as pinching or zooming of images. Larger displays might allow for interaction using two hands or even two users.

Surface acoustic wave or SAW displays use piezoelectric transducers and receivers along the sides of the screen to create a grid of invisible ultrasonic waves on the surface. A portion of the wave is absorbed when the screen is touched, with that disruption tracked to locate the touch point.

“We tend to lead with surface acoustic wave,” Olea said.

“The transparency of the glass on an SAW panel is pretty good and the touch tends to be very stable and not require frequent calibration,” he said. “On the other hand, it doesn’t work well outdoors or anywhere there is grease or high amounts of dust, such as near parking lots, in warehouses things like that. Also, you can do 2-point touch on SAW although pinching, zooming, and applications such as on-screen signatures don’t work very well.”

Milan Digital Kiosk - Grand Canal Shoppes

Last on the list of dominant touch technologies is projected capacitive technology. PCAP is a relative of capacitive touch, with the key difference being that they can be used with a stylus or a gloved finger. Projected capacitive touchscreens are built by layering a matrix of rows and columns of conductive material on sheets of glass. Voltage applied to the matrix creates a uniform electrostatic field, which is distorted when a conductive object comes into contact with the screen. That distortion serves to pinpoint the touch.

Projected capacitive and its cousin surface capacitive are relatively new technologies, similar to what’s in a smartphone. Both offer opportunities not possible with resistive and infrared touch screens.

“Capacitive technology is born and bred for multi-touch,” Olea said. “And because the touch technology is embedded in the glass it offers superior resistance to wear, vandalism and gives you a very clear, bright screen.”

Olea uses projected capacitive technology in all of its outdoor kiosk products.

“Projected capacitive screens are still fairly expensive compared with other types of touchscreens, mostly because the technology is new and there isn’t a ton of high-quality manufacturers out there making them,” Olea said. “Metal can also interfere with the function of the PCAP technology, so the integrator or kiosk designer should know what they are doing to ensure the product works as advertised.”

The final determination

Ultimately, the type of touchscreen a deployer chooses to incorporate into their application will be determined by factors including the deployer’s budget, the environment in which the device will be placed, the function the device will perform and the deployer’s plans for any future applications.

Order entry screens in the kitchens of a small fast-food restaurant chains would obviously call for resistive touch technology, for example, while a 72-inch display in a hotel lobby or shopping mall would call for infrared touch. An “endless aisle” or catalogue lookup kiosk where a shopper may want to enlarge an image of a particular product might work fine with a surface acoustic wave or surface capacitive screen, while wayfinding kiosks on a college campus or city street would likely call for projected capacitive technology.

Perhaps the deployer has plans to implement more advanced functions down the road, and wants to future-proof their investment. In that case, they may need to choose between a surface capacitive or projective capacitive screen.

At the end of the day, the best way to choose a touchscreen best suited to the application for which it will be used is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

Are All Touchscreens Created Equal?

Are All Touchscreens Created Equal

olea kioskInteractive touchscreens come in several varieties. Here’s a quick overview of the types and the applications to which each is best suited.  Whitepaper by Olea Kiosks

Although interactive touchscreens have been around in one form or another since the late 1970s, over the past 10 years or so they’ve become an integral part of our lives.

In fact, thanks to the iPhone, tablet computers and similar devices, we’ve become accustomed to the idea that we should be able to touch the screens we see and get a reaction. Interactive touchscreens are a central feature of devices ranging from ATMs to wayfinding kiosks to the photo kiosks common in drugstores around the country.

A Research and Markets study valued the size of the interactive display market at $9.9 billion in 2015, with that market estimated to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 15.5 percent over the next five years, reaching $26.9 billion by 2022.

Interactive displays include a variety of technologies, though, and not every technology is suited to every application.

Stacking them up

According to the industry trade publication Control Design, there are five main types of touchscreens: resistive touch, infrared touch, surface capacitive, surface acoustical wave and projected capacitive. Each has its advantages, disadvantages and applications for which it is best suited.

A resistive touchscreen is made up of several thin layers, including two electrically resistive layers facing each other with a thin gap between. When the top layer is touched, the two layers connect and the screen detects the position of that touch.

“Resistive touch is a very old technology that some companies still offer as their go-to,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“It works great in places with dust and grease, such as fast food restaurants, and its low price point can make it attractive for those with a limited budget,” Olea said. “I personally don’t care for it because it makes the image on the screen appear hazy and it wears out over time.”

In addition, resistive-touch screens are unable to perform the multitouch functions that are becoming increasingly popular.

touchscreen technology OleaFor very large displays, infrared touch is the most common application. Instead of a sandwich of screens, infrared touchscreens use IR emitters and receivers to create an invisible grid of beams across the display surface. When an object such as a finger interrupts the grid, sensors on the display are able to locate the exact point.

Advantages of infrared touch are excellent image quality and a long life, and they work great for gesture-based applications. In addition, scratches on the screen itself won’t affect functionality. In many cases, touch capability can be added to a display through the use of a third-party overlay placed on the existing screen.

On the downside, infrared touchscreens are susceptible to accidental activation and malfunctions due to dirt or grease buildup. They’re also not suited to outdoor applications. In addition, while adding an overlay is a relatively quick way to convert a large display into a touchscreen, extra care must be taken in mounting that overlay to ensure touches match the image displayed on the screen.

Surface capacitive screens have a connective coating applied to the front surface and a small voltage is applied to each corner. Touching the screen creates a voltage drop, with sensors on the screen using that drop to pinpoint the location of that touch. Advantages of surface capacitive technology include low cost and a resistance to environmental factors, while disadvantages include an inability to withstand heavy use and a lack of multitouch capability. Those screens are also limited to finger touches; the technology won’t work if the user is wearing gloves. DVD rental company Redbox uses surface capacitive screens in their kiosks.

Multitouch Touchscreen Technology

Other types of touchscreen tech offer the potential of more complicated functions thanks to their ability to sense several touches at the same time. Multitouch applications might include functions performed with two or more fingers, such as pinching or zooming of images. Larger displays might allow for interaction using two hands or even two users.

Surface acoustic wave or SAW displays use piezoelectric transducers and receivers along the sides of the screen to create a grid of invisible ultrasonic waves on the surface. A portion of the wave is absorbed when the screen is touched, with that disruption tracked to locate the touch point.

“We tend to lead with surface acoustic wave,” Olea said.

“The transparency of the glass on an SAW panel is pretty good and the touch tends to be very stable and not require frequent calibration,” he said. “On the other hand, it doesn’t work well outdoors or anywhere there is grease or high amounts of dust, such as near parking lots, in warehouses things like that. Also, you can do 2-point touch on SAW although pinching, zooming, and applications such as on-screen signatures don’t work very well.”

Milan Digital Kiosk - touchscreen technology

Last on the list of dominant touch technologies is projected capacitive technology. PCAP is a relative of capacitive touch, with the key difference being that they can be used with a stylus or a gloved finger. Projected capacitive touchscreens are built by layering a matrix of rows and columns of conductive material on sheets of glass. Voltage applied to the matrix creates a uniform electrostatic field, which is distorted when a conductive object comes into contact with the screen. That distortion serves to pinpoint the touch.

Projected capacitive and its cousin surface capacitive are relatively new technologies, similar to what’s in a smartphone. Both offer opportunities not possible with resistive and infrared touch screens.

“Capacitive technology is born and bred for multi-touch,” Olea said. “And because the touch technology is embedded in the glass it offers superior resistance to wear, vandalism and gives you a very clear, bright screen.”

Olea uses projected capacitive technology in all of its outdoor kiosk products.

“Projected capacitive screens are still fairly expensive compared with other types of touchscreens, mostly because the technology is new and there isn’t a ton of high-quality manufacturers out there making them,” Olea said. “Metal can also interfere with the function of the PCAP technology, so the integrator or kiosk designer should know what they are doing to ensure the product works as advertised.”

The final determination

Ultimately, the type of touchscreen a deployer chooses to incorporate into their application will be determined by factors including the deployer’s budget, the environment in which the device will be placed, the function the device will perform and the deployer’s plans for any future applications.

Order entry screens in the kitchens of a small fast-food restaurant chains would obviously call for resistive touch technology, for example, while a 72-inch display in a hotel lobby or shopping mall would call for infrared touch. An “endless aisle” or catalogue lookup kiosk where a shopper may want to enlarge an image of a particular product might work fine with a surface acoustic wave or surface capacitive screen, while wayfinding kiosks on a college campus or city street would likely call for projected capacitive technology.

Perhaps the deployer has plans to implement more advanced functions down the road, and wants to future-proof their investment. In that case, they may need to choose between a surface capacitive or projective capacitive screen.

At the end of the day, the best way to choose a touchscreen best suited to the application for which it will be used is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

Patent Granted: TSItouch Glass Retention Bezel System

TSItouch has officially received a patent for the Glass Retention Bezel System (GRBS). As of June 6 th , 2017, Patent #9,671,824 was issued to TSItouch LLC for the video wall monitor protective glass solution.

touchscreen glass retentionThe TSItouch GRBS provides an alternative solution to bonding cover glass. The GRBS is a cost effective, serviceable, and modular solution that allows protective glass (clear, anti-reflective, and anti-glare) to be mounted directly to each video wall display, providing protection to the OEM bezel and displays’ panel. In the event of a monitor
failure, the GRBS can be removed, avoiding any issues associated with servicing a bonded display.

Learn more about the patented protective glass system via the GRBS data sheet:

Visit here  to view a video illustrating the protective strength of the Glass Retention Bezel System.

For quotes and more information on this product, please contact our sales team:
[email protected]m
802-874-0123

TSItouch is a veteran owned small business located in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. The ompany was established in 1989 as a division within a defense contracting company
and re-established as an independent company in 2011. TSItouch is a manufacturer of touch screen and protective solutions for commercial grade displays and video walls.
For more information, visit http://tsitouch.com/

###

News for Elotouch – EOL Notice for Elo Touchscreen & New Website

Editor note: Elotouch is one of the must watch touchscreen vendors in the self-service kiosk space and they have a bit of news going on. The 17xx and 19xx openframe monitors have gone end of life and included here are the official notices from Elotouch. They have the new 90 series which is replacing them. Also Elotouch has just revamped their entire website and gone modern. Lots of whitespace and a little sparse. I think right now I like the old site better for getting part numbers and drawings.

ELO Notices for End-Of-Lifetouchscreen EOL

 

 

 

 

12 Month Transition Plan – 9 Months last time buy + 3 Months last time shipment

When products are obsolete, every effort is made for a smooth transition:

  • Last-time buys for the 1537L, 1739L, 2243L, and 2244L models will be accepted until February 27th ,
    2017 with last-time shipments made by May 27th , 2017
  • Last-time buys for the 1930L, 1931L, 1937L, 1939L, 1940L, and 2740L models will be accepted until March
    29th , 2017 with last-time shipments made by June 29 th , 2017
  • Please note that it is possible that some of these models such as the Infrared and SCAP units
    cannot be ordered as their components may have gone EOL already. Please consult with your
    sales representative for specific part numbers and details
  • Please work closely with your Elo sales representative on specific ongoing run-rate projects to
    develop a transition plan to the new units.

 

Elotouch Touchscreen official EOL notices

PMB 622

PMB 621

 

Touch Screen – Elo Announces New 70-inch Interactive Display with 10-touch

Product Information

Elo is pleased to announce the new 7001LT 70” Interactive Digital Signage display featuring 10-touch infrared capability. Infrared touch technology provides higher touch sensitivity and brightness to give ‘tablet-like’ performance in a giant 70″ size. The low profile design integrates beautifully into modern interior designs for retail, office, hospitality, or public space applications. The 7001LT delivers undistorted display clarity due to use of clear glass with four key features:

  • 10-touch infrared technology delivers smooth and highly responsive multi-user interaction
  • Auto-switching between active input sources eases use in meeting rooms
  • Support for serial control input with use of adapter cable (included)
  • Wider VESA 600×600 mounting points (Elo wall mount kit E248743)

The 7001LT is a high-quality, interactive canvas for engaging shoppers; and for office meeting collaboration. A new video input auto-detect feature will switch the display to the last good video input signal from the internal computer module or other external video sources. The 7001LT offers system integrators and value-added resellers (VARs) a high performance solution that is easy to deploy and maintain in public environments. With a total thickness of 3.7 inches (94 mm), the 7001LT is ADA and IBC compliant for wall-mounted installations. State of the art full HD display and video technology is utilized including a high contrast/brightness LED-backlit LCD panel, extended color gamut with movie/ gaming/photo modes, black level adjustment, and on-screen menu enhancements.

Optional, high performance computer modules are available which turn the 7001LT into a completely integrated all-in-one computer—without the need for any cables or additional mounting hardware. Computer modules are available in a choice of two models: ECMG2-i3, based on a 3.3GHz Intel Core i3 processor and graphics.

Product landing page

Product datasheet

7001LT Key Features

  • Touch technology: 10-touch infrared, HID compliant
  • 69.5” diagonal 16:9 active matrix TFT LED-backlit LCD
  • Active Display Area 60.6” x 34.1” (1538.9 x 865.6 mm)
  • Dimensions: 62.9” x 3.7” x 36.4” (1600 x 94 x 925 mm)
  • Native resolution: full HD 1920 x 1080, other resolutions supported
  • Brightness of LCD panel: 500 nits typical
  • Contrast ratio: 5000:1 typical
  • Viewing angle: 176°H/176°V
  • Video interfaces: HDMI, DisplayPort, VGA
  • Typical power consumption: 201 W
  • Weight: 149.5 lb (67.8kg)
  • Audio: 4 x 5W stereo speakers for stereo operation in landscape and portrait modes
  • Ambient light sensor: Automatic panel brightness adjustment
  • Intel OPS compliant with available adapter kit
  • Warranty: 3 years standard with additional 2 year warranty and on-site exchange available in US
  • EloView™ remote management capability

Part Number

Part NumberProduct DescriptionMarketing Description
E008823ET7001LT-9UWA-0-MT-GY-G7001LT 70-inch wide interactive digital signage display, VGA, HDMI & DisplayPort video interface, infrared 10-touch, optional computer module, worldwide-version, Clear, Gray

 

Computer Modules

Part NumberModelProcessorRAMHDDOS
E776797ECMG-i3Intel Core i3 3.3GHz HD25002 GB320 GBNo OS
E487570ECMG-i3Intel Core i3 3.3GHz HD25002 GB320 GBWindows 7
E272400ECMG-i5Intel Core i5 3.6GHz HD40004 GB320 GBNo OS
E584199ECMG-i5Intel Core i5 3.6GHz HD40004 GB320 GBWindows 7
E009007ECMG2-i3Intel Core i5 3.6 GHz HD40004 GB320 GBWindows 8.1

 

Other Accessories

MSR (E545781), NFC Adapter (E918074), OPS Kit (E102270), Replacement OSD Controller (E483757), Replacement Cable Kit (E000263), Wall Mount Kit (E248743), Webcam (E688656)

Paper Ink Touchscreen and Plays Music in This Super-Cool British Food Poster

Paper Ink Touchscreen
Paper Ink Touchscreen

Who says print is dead? If anything, it’s alive and sounds delicious! This unique poster, created by Grey London and print production and software developer Novalia, is essentially an app made of paper promoting British food brand Schwartz’s Flavour Shots.

 

Craig Keefner‘s insight:

Pretty cool touchscreen using ink

See on www.adweek.com