Advocates for the Blind Sue Over Wi-Fi Kiosks

By | August 1, 2016

New York City’s public Wi-Fi kiosks aren’t sufficiently accessible to blind people, according to claims made in a lawsuit filed Thursday by attorneys representing advocates for the disabled.

Source: www.wsj.com

The kiosks include Braille labels next to a 911 button and a headphone jack. The kiosk’s touch-screen tablet is also at a level so that those in a wheelchair are able to use it, according to a CityBridge spokesman.

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Mindy Jacobsen, a 65-year-old Brooklyn resident, is one of three blind residents suing the city. Last week, Ms. Jacobsen, who teaches technology courses in Manhattan, said she plugged her headphones into a kiosk on Eighth Avenue, hoping to use it for directions. But the maps feature was on the touch screen, which Ms. Jacobsen couldn’t use.

 

A 911 call can only be placed when an on-screen prompt is pressed.

Author: Staff Writer

Craig Keefner is the editor and author for Kiosk Association and kiosk industry. With over 30 years in the industry and experience in large and small kiosk solutions, Craig is widely considered to be an expert in the field. Major kiosk projects for him include Verizon Bill Pay kiosk and hundreds of others.