Tag Archives: coronavirus

Kiosk Product Listings for Coronavirus from KMA Press Release

Kiosk Product Listings for Coronavirus

Press release via Yahoo Finance July 2020

temperature check kiosk The Kiosk Manufacturer Association announces specific product listings for coronavirus-related self-service assistance. Tailored specifically for coronavirus product offerings are the following:

  • Temperature kiosks for screening and fever detection. Over 20 solutions to choose from and they range from less than a $1000 to more than $25K depending on regulatory approval and accuracy.
  • Outdoor kiosk solutions for temperature check, ticketing and screening.
  • Kiosk Software such as Protection As A Service, non-touch touchless software and more.
  • Touchless Solutions – range from modified IR, foot pedal, gesture, voice-nav and more.
  • Free and Discounted Covid-related hardware and software solutions. Includes portable digital signage, hand sanitizer kiosks, Sani-holders for sanitizer (designed and used by Panera e.g.).
  • Cashless – Cash-2-Card self-service kiosks create a frictionless interaction between customer and cashier.

From Craig Keefner, manager of the Kiosk Manufacturer Association, “Now is the time to provide maximum confidence and access to customers AND employees. Without customers, all the financial subsidies are only a temporary solution, and not a very profitable one. Customers and employees deserve the confidence to return to stores and workplaces. Testing and screening is key to that objective. We can include students, teachers and military personnel for that matter.”

There are many webinars on self-service our members hold. Zebra is holding a series of webinars on Innovating In A Time of Change.

The KMA outreach site at kioskindustry.org also provides an extensive list of antibacterial options and products listed including UV-C and others. The KMA site is located at https://kma.global.

Full Press release via Yahoo Finance July 2020 and also originally on BusinessWire

More Links of Interest

News Roundup

Temperature Kiosk News

 

Antibacterial Kiosk Touchscreen Wipes Coatings

Overview AntiBacterial Touch Screen Kiosk

July 2020 Coronavirus Kiosk Update:

By now we have all seen and read countless articles on how best to protect ourselves and others from bacterial infection. Before we begin we want to list some recommended resources right off the bat that can help educate your point of view on antibacterial, antimicrobial and of course, the coronavirus.

You need to be aware that different touch technology has different needs.  A 17″ or 19″ SAW or resistive is different from a large format IR (Infrared) or Cap (Projected capacitive touch) which are anywhere from 22″ to 85″. Typically 32,42,46,55 and 65).

Mitigation requires several tools in combination to fully address antibacterial. There are no silver bullets though daily cleaning of touchscreens is the closest to that.

On antimicrobial coatings — it is important to remember these coating generally “inhibit the growth”. If you can inhibit growth over 72 hours (ie no touching of screen) then bacteria will die on its own accord. Antimicrobial coatings do not kill bacteria directly.  Also note that there are companies who are taking advantage of the situation.

Lawsuits 6 months down the road are a definite possibility if you make false promises based on a false sell.  Always ask what it does and what it doesn’t do.

Our current recommendations:

  1. Clean surfaces with warm soapy water. That breaks down the viruses and removes it.  Touch screens use different solution.
  2. Another option — wipe down with bleach wipes and after several passes of that wipe down with Easy Screen.
  3. Bleach – figure 1/3 cup bleach per gallon of water for mix ratio
  4. Avoid highly concentrated solutions of alcohol based.
  5. If you want to “double-clean” then consider getting handheld UVC product like the Blade below for localized and safe UVC cleaning (after surfaces have been wiped down).  Oily fingers are one of the complicating factors to consider.
  6. Include hand sanitizer station near the kiosk
  7. Place a daily maintenance sheet near the kiosk indicating last maintenance and cleaning. Ideally, build it into your application so the maintenance cycle is automated, recorded and displayed at the actual device.

Questions for AntiMicrobial Providers

  • Can you done any independent lab tests?
  • Can you send those results?
  • What specific bacteria does it inhibit?
  • What bacteria does it promote?  (yes, some actually promote)
  • How long does bacteria survive on a treated screen?

Recommended Resources

Some recommended sources of internet resources include:

PDI Update

PDI has been monitoring the COVID-19 epidemic (SARS-CoV-2 virus), previously identified as 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), to provide you the most current information to help manage this outbreak. The CDC has recently issued additional recommendations for surface disinfection, including recommendations for the use of an EPA-approved disinfectant with emerging viral pathogens claims. This letter supersedes previous letter issued on January 30, 2020.

Super Sani-Cloth ® Wipes, Sani-Cloth ® AF3 Wipes, and Sani-Cloth ® Bleach Wipes meet the criteria for the EPA emerging viral pathogens claim. PDI has submitted the addition of the required language for this claim on these master labels to the EPA and is awaiting expedited approval. Recently launched products, including Sani-Cloth ® Prime Wipes, Sani-Prime ® Spray, Sani-24 ® Spray, and Sani-HyPerCideTM Spray already have the EPA emerging viral pathogens claim on their master labels.

Recommended Wipe

Super Sani-Cloth is what we would recommend. It is the most equipment friendly wipe that is on the list.

The SARS-CoV-2 virus still has not been made readily available by the CDC for testing. The CDC states: “If there are no available EPA-registered products that have an approved emerging viral pathogens claim for COVID-19, products with label claims against human coronaviruses should be used according to label instructions.” The following PDI products have label claims against human coronaviruses:

Click for full size

Handheld cleaning would include after-hours with handheld UV device (example here is Blade). $500

Don’t Believe It

Bad Data Tabloids

A year or so ago an article on “dirty” McDonalds touchscreens came out in London tabloid and while proved inaccurate there are those that have used it to create a certain fear factor. The intent of the article was essentially “clickbait” for sensational traffic.

We have articles here on the site from legitimate sources which disproved and countered. Companies will also use this article as “fear factor” for buying their products. If this article is their primary credential then that tells you something.

While some fantastical things like your Marketing people making decisions at midnight in the company parking lot via chicken bones and marbles  can be considered possibly true, we like to think they utilize factual analytic data.

Employees

  • Training employees to clean their hands and then to clean the public surfaces on regular basis is best practice
  • Do employees get paid sick time or do they have to come into work and potentially infect people?
  • You’ve opted not to use the cleaned kiosk and go to the counter. How close is that McDonalds person to you talking to you and how many people have been talking in that zone? Drive Thru’s get a lot busier.

But what about your cellphone?

Because phones get so dirty, they’re as important to keep clean as your hands. But you can’t lather, rinse, repeat your phone with soap and water — so that’s where alternative cleaning methods come into play, such as UV lights that disinfect your device.

A new study conducted by PhoneSoap, a company that sells UV sanitizing devices for your phones, has found that the surface of the average device is 18 times dirtier than a public restroom. In an interview with Mashable, co-founder Dan Barnes says PhoneSoap calls phones “the third hand you never wash.”


Difference between Antimicrobial and AntiBacterial

Antimicrobial and antibacterial solutions for touchscreens and kiosks have been around a long time and there has been improvements over the years.  Important in the self-service terminal that the treatment does not affect the touchscreen

The primary difference between antibacterial and antimicrobial substances is the types of microorganisms they act upon. While antibacterial products prevent the development of bacteria, antimicrobial agents such as alcohol-based hand sanitizers prevent the spread of bacteria, fungi, and some viruses. This is a much broader scope of protection than the protection found in antibacterial products.

Cleansing wipes are one type of product that is available as both an antibacterial product and an antimicrobial product. Antibacterial hand wipes kill bacteria, while antimicrobial wipes kill bacteria plus other microorganisms that can cause human illness. Both antibacterial and antimicrobial wipes can be a component of effective hand hygiene.

Antibacterial Kiosk Solutions

Wipes – PDI Easy Screen

Compatible touchscreen cleaner that works.

• Features the power of 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA)
• Fast-drying, No residue, Anti-fogging, Anti-streaking
• Rapidly cleans dirt, grime, fingerprints, and smudges
• Compatible with touchscreen healthcare equipment, including Corning® Gorilla® Glass (3 and 4)1, Sapphire glass, Aluminum silicate, Acrylic Glass, Etched glass, Stainless steel, and more!  MSDS Sheet.

Spray & Coating – Sanitech Information

SurfaceClean is a hospital-grade cleaner disinfectant that kills 99.9% of germs and bacteria on hard, non-porous surfaces.

SurfaceClean- enhances the effectiveness of our antimicrobial coatings by properly preparing surfaces for antimicrobial treatment

SurfaceClean is designed for use prior to the application of long lasting antimicrobial products. It is also recommended for regular maintenance cleaning.

SurfaceClean is a cost effective and easy to use solution. SurfaceClean is available in 32 ounce spray bottles and 1 or 5 gallon containers.

 SurfaceClean Disinfects and Eliminates:

      • 99% of Germs and Bacteria
      • Healthcare associated MRSA
      • Community associated MRSA
      • H1N1 Flu Virus
      • SARS
      • Avian Influenza
      • Hepatitis
      • Mumps
      • Rhinovirus
      • Rotovirus

For how long?

SurfaceAide XL delivers durability, safety and affordability to protect vital surfaces from the growth of bacteria, mold and fungi 24/7 for up to 90 days.

SurfaceAide XL

  • Generates an environmentally friendly, non-leaching antimicrobial barrier on surfaces that is non-toxic and non-sensitizing
  • Promotes long-term reduction of harmful bacteria, mold and fungi on surfaces
  • Minimizes the presence of microbes on touch points that can serve as transfer routes for bacteria from surface-to-skin
  • One application effectively fights the growth of bacteria, mold and fungi, non-stop on surfaces for up to 90 days
  • Proactively and continually prevents odor, staining and deterioration caused by bacteria, fungi, mold and mildew
  • Can be safely and easily applied without affecting day to day  operations
  • Invisible, odorless and will not affect the appearance or performance of treated surfaces
  • Since SurfaceAide XL does not leach, the organism cannot emerge as a new resistant microbe or “super bug”
  • Essentially dimethyl ammonium chlorides

Clorox Professional

Link – competes with PDI.  Using “Quat Alcohol”.

Here is the Clorox info.  Same as PDI but percentages are not revealed.  Price is different I am guessing.

AEGIS INFO

Treated vs. Untreated Surface — The unique AEGIS Microbe Shield is a fabric enhancement that gives the treated surface active antibacterial action. The germ-killing action is the result of a micro polymer coating, which mechanically destroys bacteria, mold, fungus and their allergens on contact. AEGIS contains no chemicals, is not consumed by microorganisms, and remains effective for the life of the product.

COPPER AND ALLOYS

 

Copper alloys have the advantages of not only killing “bad bacteria” but they continue to kill it.  Chart compares copper, brass and stainless.

 

And yes copper has an ROI model based on cost savings.

 

UV-C Antibacterial Light

Another antibacterial  tool is UV-C light. It however has many cautions.  We have a separate summary page for UV-C Antibacterial located here.

What Are Germicidal Lamps?

Germicidal lamps emit radiation in the UV-C portion of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum, which includes wavelengths between 100 and 280 nanometers (nm). The lamps are used in a variety of applications where disinfection is the primary concern, including air and water purification, food and beverage protection, and sterilization of sensitive tools such as medical instruments. Germicidal light destroys the ability of bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens to multiply by deactivating their reproductive capabilities. The average bacteria may be killed in 10 seconds at a

Blade UV-C cleaner
The handheld, portable UVC Blade deactivates bacteria, viruses and fungi in hard to reach places and in environments that only need occasional exposure to UVC light. It is also an effective solution for mold remediation.
The Blade features an on/off safety switch, and a comfortable handle that minimizes grip discomfort.
Hazard and Risks from Germicidal Lamp UV Radiation

UV radiation (UVR) used in most germicidal bulbs is harmful to both skin and eyes, and germicidal bulbs should not be used in any fixture or application that was not designed specifically to prevent exposure to humans or animals. UVR is not felt immediately; in fact, the user may not realize the danger until after the exposure has caused damage. Symptoms typically occur 4 to 24 hours after exposure. The effects on skin are of two types: acute and chronic. Acute effects appear within a few hours of exposure, while chronic effects are long-lasting and cumulative and may not appear for years. An acute effect of UVR is redness of the skin called erythema (similar to sunburn). Chronic effects include accelerated skin aging and skin cancer. UVR is absorbed in the outer layers of the eye – the cornea and conjunctiva. Acute overexposure leads to a painful temporary inflammation, mainly of the cornea, known as photokeratitis. Subsequent overexposure to the UV is unlikely because of the pain involved. Chronic exposure leads to an increased risk of certain types of ocular cataracts. Working unprotected for even a few minutes can cause injury. It is possible to calculate the threshold for acute effects and to set exposure limits. It is not possible, however, to calculate threshold for chronic effects; therefore, because no exposure level is safe, exposure should be reduced as much as possible.

UV-C Handheld Blade FAQ
  1. How does one use it?

With the Blade unit, all you need to do is get it as close to the surface as possible and pass it over the surface. Being one inch away, a few seconds exposure kills all bacteria and virus.

  1. How long does it take?

Some take a little longer than normal but a few seconds is plenty if 1 inch away

  1. What is the wrong way to use them?

You don’t shine the light up or at anyone and the operator should wear safety glasses which we include with every unit

  1. How does it handle oily fingerprints and smudges?

The surface should be wiped down for the best application

  1. These should be used in off-hours when no customers or patients around?  Example: the front lobby of VA where check-in’s are taking place.

They can be used 24 hours a day, you just need to have people stand back while you run the unit over the surface

UV-C Resources

For more information and assistance contact KMA

More reference and useful links

Craig is a  senior staff writer for Kiosk Industry Group Association. He has 25 years of experience in the industry. He contributed to this article and even accepted an award for UV-C. Craig is also a senior manager for Olea Kiosks Inc.

Free COVID-19 Services Kiosk Manufacturers Association

Free COVID-19 Kiosk Services from KMA

The Kiosk Manufacturer Association sponsors, members and working groups understand the pain and trouble that current companies are undergoing with business disruption. Many of these COVID specials are free, or discounted, or deferred payment. We share your pain. All hands on deck is a good motto.

To help here are some COVID-19 specific solutions being offered, many of them free.  THey range from Ecommerce, Digital Signs, Portable Digital Signs, Temperature Check Kiosks, Secure Endpoints for home corporate and footfall or customers-in-store count.

Free eCommerce functionality from Datacap — make takeout & delivery-only easier.

Antibacterial Touchscreen Treatment recommendations by industry manufacturers. Link

Voice Activation & Control – basic version and advanced version for full engagement. More info

Free Mobile Wayfinding App from 22MilesDownload free app

E-Ink Battery Mobile Signs & Powered Digital Room / Wayfinding Signs – Free 6 months. More info

Temperature Check Kiosks – countertop and pedestal from Olea

Free Notifications Suite — keeps Shelter-in-Place employees informed. link for more information.

Relief Program — Hospitality, education, & healthcare industries. 3 free months hosting  Link.

Digital Signage Quick Bundle — 22Miles with hardware display partner Peerless-AV®. More info

Large Capacity Sanitizer and Water Refilling Stations – For More Information

Multifunction Kiosk with integrated Hand Sanitizer dispenseFor more information

Free 3D-Printed Sani-Holders for iPad kiosk or Wall. Developed for Panera by Lilitab. Contact KMA

Portable Digital Signage – 5 rolling 43 inch LCDs w/software. Free setup, training. $9900. Contact KMA

Secure Corporate Endpoint VXL low-cost, 6-month license to convert current desktops and laptops 

Customer Count Analysis – regulate number of customers entering premises with floor sensors. Link

We will be adding to this list in the coming days. Be sure and check back with the Kiosk Manufacturer Association for more assistance in the coming days.

For more information you can contact us

NRF – Guidance For Re-Opening Stores

See NRF link for resources

Operation Open Doors – Path to Reopen Retail, led by NRF and Seyfarth LLP, is providing guidance and tools that NRF members can use as they navigate opening stores after this international health crisis. Areas for guidance on gradual reopenings include logistics, social distancing and safety issues, and how to bring employees back to the workforce.


Operation Open Doors Checklist

Explore the Operation Open Doors Checklist, an outline of key topics to consider as retailers seek to reopen operations. The checklist and select other Operation Open Doors resources will be available to the public for a limited time before they become members-only resources. Click here more information about NRF membership.

Resource Downloads

Resources are being developed in the following areas. Check back often for the latest additions.

    • COVID-19 Logistics
      Access to property (including mall and landlord issues), inventory cleaning and management, protocols for soft openings, obtaining cleaning supplies and PPE
    • COVID-19 Returning Employees – Legal Issues
      How to bring people back from furlough and layoffs, and surrounding legal issues

 

  • COVID-19 Liability Issues
    Negligence, workforce laws, state and local laws of which to be aware

These resources are being developed by a broad mix of retail brands and professionals. If you would like to be involved, please sign up here.

Touchscreen Safe Antimicrobial Sprays and Wipes

Disinfectant Wipes for Touch Screen

By now we have all seen and read countless articles on how best to protect ourselves and others from bacterial infection. Before we begin we want to list some recommended resources right off the bat that can help educate your point of view on antibacterial, antimicrobial and of course, the coronavirus. See our full portal page on AntiBacterial for more information.

Our current recommendations:

  1. Clean surfaces with warm soapy water. That breaks down the viruses and removes it.
  2. Another option — wipe down with bleach wipes and after several passes of that wipe down with Easy Screen.
  3. Bleach – figure 1/3 cup bleach per gallon of water for mix ratio
  4. Avoid highly concentrated solutions of alcohol based.
  5. If you want to “double-clean” then consider getting handheld UVC product like the Blade below for localized and safe UVC cleaning (after surfaces have been wiped down). Oily fingers are one of the complicating factors to consider.

Disinfectant Wipes For Touch Screen

 

 

PDI Update

PDI has been monitoring the COVID-19 epidemic (SARS-CoV-2 virus), previously identified as 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), to provide you the most current information to help manage this outbreak. The CDC has recently issued additional recommendations for surface disinfection, including recommendations for the use of an EPA-approved disinfectant with emerging viral pathogens claims. This letter supersedes previous letter issued on January 30, 2020.

Super Sani-Cloth ® Wipes, Sani-Cloth ® AF3 Wipes, and Sani-Cloth ® Bleach Wipes meet the criteria for the EPA emerging viral pathogens claim. PDI has submitted the addition of the required language for this claim on these master labels to the EPA and is awaiting expedited approval. Recently launched products, including Sani-Cloth ® Prime Wipes, Sani-Prime ® Spray, Sani-24 ® Spray, and Sani-HyPerCideTM Spray already have the EPA emerging viral pathogens claim on their master labels.

Recommended Wipe

Super Sani-Cloth is what we would recommend. It is the most equipment friendly wipe that is on the list.

The SARS-CoV-2 virus still has not been made readily available by the CDC for testing. The CDC states: “If there are no available EPA-registered products that have an approved emerging viral pathogens claim for COVID-19, products with label claims against human coronaviruses should be used according to label instructions.” The following PDI products have label claims against human coronaviruses:

Click for full size

Handheld cleaning would include after-hours with handheld UV device (example here is Blade). $700

UV-C Handheld Blade FAQ
  1. How does one use it?

With the Blade unit, all you need to do is get it as close to the surface as possible and pass it over the surface. Being one inch away, a few seconds exposure kills all bacteria and virus.

  1. How long does it take?

Some take a little longer than normal but a few seconds is plenty if 1 inch away

  1. What is the wrong way to use them?

You don’t shine the light up or at anyone and the operator should wear safety glasses which we include with every unit

  1. How does it handle oily fingerprints and smudges?

The surface should be wiped down for the best application

  1. These should be used in off-hours when no customers or patients around? Example: the front lobby of VA where check-in’s are taking place.

They can be used 24 hours a day, you just need to have people stand back while you run the unit over the surface

See our full portal page on AntiBacterial for more information.

To request more information and assistance contact KMA

Gaming News – Despite Coronavirus Shutdown Skill Games Still Open

From GGB News Apr 2020 Skill Games Still Active

 

On Monday, March 16, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board ordered all casinos in the state to shut down, part of the larger nationwide effort to slow the spread of the deadly coronavirus. The following day, gaming boards in Missouri and Kansas followed suit, and eventually, the entire legal gaming industry was at a standstill.

Many in the industry initially thought social distancing—shutting down two or three slot machines between each active game—would allow casinos to remain open. Then the Centers for Disease Control revealed that the Covid-19 virus can survive up to two or three days on stainless steel, plastic and other nonporous surfaces—like gaming machines. An industry shutdown was unavoidable.

But as recently as last weekend, convenience stores, pizza parlors, gas stations and other retail locations in Pennsylvania, Missouri and elsewhere still had live gaming machines operating. These are the so-called “skill games” that had been cropping up in several states prior to the crisis, the subject of an effort launched in February to battle them by the Association of Gaming Equipment Manufacturers (AGEM) and the American Gaming Association (AGA).

Read full article — From GGB News Apr 2020 Skill Games Still Active

Kiosk Manufacturer Association Statement on Coronavirus Healthcare Crisis

Press release on BusinessWire March 2020

WESTMINSTER, Colo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The Kiosk Manufacturer Association is aggressively working with our customers and suppliers to ensure that clear and accurate information is available. Whether Healthcare, Retail or Transportation we are assisting.

Identifying all of the potential sources of infection that customers and employees face in everyday interaction is a challenge. Whether it is mobile phones, credit card reader buttons, signature styli, credit cards, cash, coin, checks, ink pens, keyboards, accessibility devices, touchscreens and more, all come into play as things we touch.

On a recent call with a Healthcare provider talking about Kiosks it was decided that the preference would be for patients to interact with the Kiosk vs. staff. This would limit the potential to transmit a disease to staff at a reception desk. The good news here is the machine is easily cleaned after each use if needed. Most person to person interactions are in close proximity and entail talking, passing back and forth of cash or credit cards and a receipt. All of which both people touch.

This is just one example of the advantages of human-to-machine interface versus human-to-human.

Cleaning is the highest priority at this time. Fortunately simple soap and water is the most effective elimination method as it essentially dissolves a virus. Bleach based cleaning agents are highly effective as are some of the rated industrial wipes (PDI for example which serves the majority of healthcare).

At this time our recommendations are:

  • clean surfaces with warm soapy water. That breaks down the viruses and removes them.
  • Another option — wipe down with bleach wipes and after several passes of that wipe down with medical grade wipe such as Easy Screen

The KMA maintains a solutions page on the Kiosk Industry website which lists additional tools which can be used against bacteria and also microbes. That includes retrofittable solutions for touchscreens including film and coatings. Ultimately it comes down to regular cleaning.

The Kiosk Manufacturer Association will continue to provide all and any solutions for the particular situation.

For more information visit our summary page.

If your company, organization, association, local, city, state or federal agency would like to participate at some level with the KMA either with ADA or with EMV, please contact craig@kma.global or call 720-324-1837

Thanks for the generous financial support of our GOLD sponsors Olea Kiosks | KioWare | Nanonation | Pyramid | Frank Mayer | Vispero | Zebra | ZIVELO

Contacts

Craig Keefner
craig@kma.global
720-324-1837

The science of soap – here’s how it kills the coronavirus

Excerpt from TheGuardian March 2020 — Pall Thordarson – professor of chemistry at the University of New South Wales, Sydney

Note: Along with soap, diluting some water with some bleach is highly effective though after repeated applications you may need to clean some of the residue.

Viruses can be active outside the body for hours, even days. Disinfectants, liquids, wipes, gels and creams containing alcohol are all useful at getting rid of them – but they are not quite as good as normal soap.

So why does soap work so well on the Sars-CoV-2, the coronavirus and indeed most viruses? The short story: because the virus is a self-assembled nanoparticle in which the weakest link is the lipid (fatty) bilayer. Soap dissolves the fat membrane and the virus falls apart like a house of cards and dies – or rather, we should say it becomes inactive as viruses aren’t really alive.

The slightly longer story is that most viruses consist of three key building blocks: ribonucleic acid (RNA), proteins and lipids. A virus-infected cell makes lots of these building blocks, which then spontaneously self-assemble to form the virus. Critically, there are no strong covalent bonds holding these units together, which means you do not necessarily need harsh chemicals to split those units apart. When an infected cell dies, all these new viruses escape and go on to infect other cells. Some end up also in the airways of lungs.

Soap contains fat-like substances known as amphiphiles, some of which are structurally very similar to the lipids in the virus membrane. The soap molecules “compete” with the lipids in the virus membrane. This is more or less how soap also removes normal dirt from the skin.

The soap not only loosens the “glue” between the virus and the skin but also the Velcro-like interactions that hold the proteins, lipids and RNA in the virus together.

Read complete article at TheGuardian March 2020

Self-Service Kiosks — Reducing Risk of Virus Transmission

Excerpt from Olea Kiosks website March 2020

Since the onset of COVID-19, there have been many questions posed about how to help mitigate the spread of the virus. How much worse the situation gets depends on our ability to contain and mitigate risk as it relates to the people and places we visit.

That being said, we’re all being encouraged to limit our exposure to large venues with vast numbers of people.  Public health officials are advising we limit our person-to-person interaction to reduce the probability of contact between persons with the virus, and the spread of airborne particles to minimize transmission from one individual to another.

As we limit human to human interaction to reduce the risk of transmission, we, as an industry, can talk about the value of continuing many day-to-day tasks by moving that interaction to a more preferable human to machine interface like kiosks.

Limit Person-to-Person Interaction

Self-service kiosks, in any environment, can help to limit person-to-person interaction, in turn, reducing the risk of transmission of disease or virus between staff and patients or guests. Because most person-to-person interactions occur within close proximity, and often entails talking, the passing back and forth of credit cards or some other form of payment, and a receipt, it escalates the chances of exposure.  The preference is for patients or guests to interact with a Kiosk rather than with staff at the reception desk.

At a reception desk, the risk escalates because lines are more likely, there is interaction between the staff and guest, and viruses can linger in the air and on the desk. While the desk can be cleaned between guests, it’s challenging to wipe the surface and maintain guest flow at the same time. However, this can be easily done with a kiosk.

Kiosks, used in any situation, can limit the contact between staff and guests.  This is true for Healthcare providers with check-in kiosks, ticketing kiosks at movie cinemas or amusement parks, food ordering kiosks, transportation, parking and just about any application you can think of.

Antibacterial and antimicrobial cleaning and disinfecting for self-service kiosks
o Place anti-bacterial wipes at the kiosks for users to perform a cleaning before/after their use.
o Having hand sanitizer to use before and after kiosk use will also help to mitigate the transfer of microbes from person to person via the kiosk glass touchscreen.
o Consider having a staff person come in periodically during the day/peak times to perform some of the activities listed below to instill additional confidence in users.

 

Read full article at Olea Kiosks website

ATMIA Statement on Coronavirus- ATM Effect

Statement by Mike Lee, CEO of ATMIA, issues statement regarding ATMs and recent coronavirus. Marc 13, 2020

New Coronavirus Health Crisis – Separating Fact from Fiction

A Statement by the ATM Industry Association for Immediate Global Release

ATMIA Logo Panic reactions are happening across the world as the new corona virus, for which there isn’t yet human immunity, spreads. We are seeing emptier supermarket shelves, an extremely volatile stock market, cancelled events and flights and many other signs of fear spreading even faster than the virus itself.

The medical consensus is that this virus is transmitted through respiratory droplets, primarily when infected persons sneeze, or cough, and the viral droplets then hook onto mucous or saliva of another person to gain a foothold in their cells so the virus can reproduce in that new host body.

The best advice is to regularly sanitise hands and disinfect surfaces, which may have been contaminated by viral droplets, while avoiding, as far as possible, touching one’s nose, eyes or mouth. We know that in close contact with an infected person, such as when shaking hands, or when we touch a doorknob, tabletop or surface previously touched by an infected person, we run a risk of catching the virus.

Since people don’t usually sneeze or cough into their banknotes, and since we all touch dozens of surfaces every day, it is disingenuous to single out cash as a medium of transmission of the virus. Handling cards, mobile devices and touching keypads in public places, not to mention countless other surfaces, can carry an equal risk. What is important is frequent hand sanitising to kill off any viral droplets, given that the virus has a fragile envelope surrounding it which can be readily destroyed through disinfectants.

Professor Raina MacIntyre, the head of the biosecurity programme at the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, supporting the idea that airborne respiratory droplets would the most common means of transmission for the new corona virus, highlights the fact that the range of objects which can cause an infection when they have a residue of the viral droplets on them would be so broad that to remove all potential sources of infection is simply impossible.

“Like every other object in the universe, physical money has its surfaces,” said Mike Lee, CEO of ATMIA and President of the ATM Security Association. “The scapegoating of cash by some agencies and media is an irresponsible piece of pseudo-science, or bias, because it can distract citizens from the risks of infection on all other surfaces of their daily lives. Let’s all grow up and not arbitrarily insert into this health crisis the phoney old war on cash. It’s not exactly an edifying spectacle to see an epidemic being exploited in this manner.”

ATMIA urges all members and all companies in the industry to take the necessary precautions, especially in terms of regular hand and surface disinfection, but to continue life and business as normal as far as humanly possible. “This epidemic will surely peak at some time, and then recede, and panic serves no rational purpose,” Lee concluded. “Cash is a vital social service for billions in everyday life, but it’s even more important when there’s a crisis.”

About ATMIA www.atmia.com

ATMIA is a global not-for-profit trade association for the ATM and cash industries, which was founded in 1997 and now has over 11,000 members in about 70 countries. ATMIA runs the ATM Security Association and the Consortium for Next Gen ATMs. Contact Mike Lee at mike@atmia.com