Category Archives: ADA

ADA and Kiosks

Kiosk ADA Accessibility Resources & ADA Compliance


Regulatory agencies have a profound effect on the business of self-service. The kiosk manufacturer association (KMA) monitors kiosk and self-service ADA, Accessibility and the development & implementation of regulatory bodies and, where possible, we participate in the regulatory process by educating and informing agencies regarding our members & businesses.

COVID Self-Service Kiosk Catalog – Temperature Kiosks and Automatic Sanitizers Dispensers

Kiosk Worker Catalog Multi-Vendor

Westminster, CO September 2020 — The Kiosk Association (KMA) is proud to announce the first multi-vendor kiosk solution catalog for COVID-related kiosk “worker” solutions. Over twenty different solutions related to COVID, Temperature Scanning, CDC Health Screening, Automatic Hand Sanitizers, software, ADA consulting and services are available for purchase. CAKCEK, our authorized distributor, has been actively bidding this catalog of solutions in various RFPs in the SLED and Federal markets. Put qualified technology to work for you.

Compliance Issues

Temperature kiosks come with a Certificate of Compliance regarding sensor accuracy. They are designed and manufactured by members which meet the KMA ADA conformance requirements in ADA, Accessibility, FDA, and PCI to name some of the relevant regulatory issues. Kiosks solutions manufactured primarily in the US are available.  Members from the UK and Germany with offices in the U.S. also are available.
ada KIOSK CERTIFICATION

CAKCEK has been established as the authorized distributor for KMA conformance solutions. The owner of CAKCEK, Craig Keefner says, “We’ve been monitoring the temperature and thermal imaging market closely. The proliferation of Chinese-origin devices with undisclosed components both software and hardware into this market has been disconcerting at best. Almost all of those units come with facial recognition, artificial intelligence, and a general inattention to regulatory and legal issues. This raises serious liability issues, especially for healthcare-oriented deployments, down the road as well as the general health concerns of false positives. By offering a catalog of KMA approved choices our first priority is to inform and educate buyers in the marketplace.”

Kiosk “Workers” Available

  • Temperature Scanning Kiosks
    • Low pixel count entry-level with medical-grade sensors
    • Medium pixel count mid-level systems
    • High-end thermal imaging systems which are FDA-certified
    • Systems include quantity pricing and Lease options
    • Repurposing options provided
    • Digital signage options provided
    • Smart City kiosk options
    • Countertop, Stand-up, Sit-down and Wall-Mount configurations
    • Microsoft Surface Tablet Options
    • iPad options
  • CDC Screening Stations
    • CDC Recommended Health Screening kiosk options
  • Sanitizer Kiosks
    • Heavy duty cycle sanitizer dispense systems
    • Standup systems
    • Countertop systems
    • Standup system including digital signage
  • Software Only Solutions
    • NoTouch Touchless Software (Android and Windows)
    • Digital signage options (some portable and outdoors)
    • Secure lockdown software KioWare, Sitekiosk and Esper are available for purchase
    • JAWS accessibility software for Windows is available
  • Warranty and Service
    • Standard one year warranty on all systems
    • Sanitizer kiosks come with 2-year warranty
    • All original manuals are in English. Chinese not available.
    • Training and Train the Trainer Available
    • White-Glove Project Coverage
  • Consulting
    • ADA and Accessibility consulting company packages
    • PCI EMV consulting company packages
  • Country of Origin
    • USA
    • Canada (sanitizer kiosks)
    • Germany and UK units are also available though we expect those will soon have manufacturing in the US

FAQ Questions

Our brochure includes a set of 23 questions that you should be asking before any purchase. Examples include:

  1. Many Chinese kiosks facial recognition use blacklisted Chinese tech firms.  This is a distinct liability for deployers in health care industry.
  2.  Chinese-made relabeled units are marked up anywhere from 100% to 600% and can be reviewed at Alibaba. 
  3. Have you read the FDA enforcement letter and understand it? We have a FAQ. It appears that the window of forgiveness is starting to contract introducing liabilities
  4. We recommend opinion post on Chinese software for more background.

Security Issues

Most of the Chinese-origin units employ facial recognition in concert with inexpensive thermopile temperature sensor. The technology employs algorithms and server connections from blacklisted Chinese tech firms such as Dahua and HKVision. This brings privacy concerns to the forefront.

How To Purchase

  1. Your first option is for CAKCEK to connect you with the partner product you wish to purchase. You arrange the purchase directly with them.
  2. You purchase from CAKCEK. We process the order and manage it for you.
  3. If desired you can purchase direct from the partner but CAKCEK will remain involved as a point of coordination.

Contact Us

You can email Craig@catareno.com for more info or complete the form here indicating your interest.  We offer primarily to the SLED and Federal market for now.

 

Kiosk Solutions Catalog Related Links

IPVM Report on tablets from China https://ipvm.com/reports/bems-tablet-tested

Chinese Software – The New Danger?

Temperature Kiosk – Breakdown of Bad Georgia Deal – Reverse Best Practice

 

COVID-19 Screening Solution From Kiosk Group – Full CDC Compliance and Accurate

Checkpoint COVID-19 Health Screening Kiosk

kioskgroup checkpoint 2 Reopening during the COVID-19 “new normal” brings a unique set of challenges for employers, starting with how to keep your employees and visitors safe.

The Center for Disease Control’s current guidelines recommend that employers should offer daily health screening checks before allowing entry into a facility.

Daily Proof of Screening

Kiosk Group’s CheckPoint Kiosk allows you to easily screen employees and visitors with a simple set of health screening questions. After screening, a date-stamped badge is printed for easy identification within your facility.

This touchless kiosk solution reduces the risk of COVID-19 transmission in your facility while protecting individuals’ privacy.

Simple, Touchless Interface

kioskgroup checkpoint 3 The kiosk interface is voice-activated for touchless interaction, reducing touch points that could potentially transmit the virus. The interface also supports touch for visitors who are unable to interact by voice or just prefer touch. An optional holder for sanitizer wipes or hand sanitizer is available separately to help keep visitors safe.

On-screen instructions show visitors exactly how to use the kiosk and what to expect.

• Roo Label Printer Kiosk
• 10.2-inch iPad
• Star Micronics TSP74311 Bluetooth Printer
• CheckPoint Software
• Sanitation Kit
• Graphics Kit

Solution Includes

COVID-19 Screening Solution
A date-stamped badge is printed after screening.

Voice Activated

The kiosk informs employees & visitors that they must be screened before entering.

Quick Screening

This screening consists of a short series of questions based on CDC guidelines for eligibility to work, including questions about fever, symptoms, and possible exposure.

Print Badge

People deemed to be low-risk receive a printed badge which must be worn at all times while in the facility. The badge includes the day of the week and date in clear, large text that can be easily checked while still maintaining adequate social distancing.

Next-Step Instructions

Anyone in a high-risk group is asked to leave the facility immediately and receives a printed set of instructions on what to do next.

How It Works

Privacy First

Designed around the idea of privacy first, our screening kiosk does not store any identifying data about those who have been screened. By providing physical proof that a visitor or employee has undergone screening, this solution avoids the privacy and security issues that affect many traditional check-in solutions.

Be sure and visit the extensive Checkpoint FAQ which includes pricing and terms.

Since 2006, Kiosk Group has been transforming self-service ideas into dynamic tablet kiosk solutions. Your business has special needs — let us show you how we can help.

For more information —

  • Phone: (301) 732-4629
  • eMail: HARDWARE-SALES@KIOSKGROUP.COM
  • Web: KIOSKGROUP.COM

Brochures and FAQ

CheckPoint Kiosk FAQ 8-18-20

Kiosk Group CheckPoint Screening Solution Flyer 6-25-20

Contact Now

Pursuant Health kiosks for Diabetes to offer Risk Test – CDR – Chain Drug Review

Pursuant Health kiosks for Diabetes

diabetes kiosk
Kiosk by Frank Mayer Associates, Inc.

Pursuant Health’s national, in-store health kiosk network will begin connecting consumers to the American Diabetes Association’s Diabetes Risk Test.

Source: www.chaindrugreview.com

Pursuant Health said the ADA’s test, which helps build public awareness of the risks for type 2 diabetes, will be available through its more than 3,600 health kiosks in retail pharmacy locations, including such chains as Walmart and Safeway. Plans call for Pursuant’s kiosks to offer the test for three years, starting in November recognition of American Diabetes Month.

A Wheelchair That Lets You Stand – ADA Kiosk Standards for Self-Service Kiosks

Wheelchair Kiosk ADA

ADA kiosk, HIPAA kiosk, ADA tablet kiosk, HIPAA tablet kiosk, PCI, Section 508

New wheelchair that stands you up is nice technology. Video included. UPnRIDE is the name and invented in Israel.

https://upnride.com/

What is UPnRIDE

UPnRIDE is a wheeled robotic device, providing upright and seated mobility both for wheelchair users, and for anyone who is unable to, or has difficulty standing or walking.

UPnRIDE offers numerous medical, psychological, and economic benefits, ensuring safety while standing, sitting, and shifting between positions, in practically any urban environment.

Kiosk ADA Accessibility Guidelines – August 2020 KMA Framework Available for Purchase

Guidelines Kiosk ADA Accessibility – August 2020

Kiosk ADA Accessibility

One of 10 or so diagrams of distance and accessibility for wheelchair users. This is the most common structural regulation along with sight and hearing impaired.

Too often when projects requirements are detailed, ADA and accessibility considerations are often reduced to the simple phrase, “Must be ADA compliant”.  This statement is open to definition and inevitably results in range of bids with widely different ADA “compliance”.

The Kiosk Manufacturer Association has looked at the various ADA regulations in the marketplace and distilled the “kiosk applicable” regulations.  There are actually two sets the KMA provides.

  1. Current regulations as stated.  These are the currently mandated regulations.  These have been reviewed by the U.S. Access Board. One of the main future objectives of the U.S. Access Board is harmonizing the U.S. regulations with the European regulations so there is one worldwide standard. The reference docs for this include:

    1. ADA 2010

    2. Section 508

    3. DOT Air Carrier Access

    4. Other standards to consider: Canadian standards, WCAG, European EN301-549 as well as EMV, state jurisdictional laws and supplemental regulations such as HIPAA, Medical, UL and more.

  2. Code of Practice (Going Forward) – taking the existing standards and restructuring them along with adding in some new technology (voice command e.g.) the KMA developed the Code of Conduct going forward. The intent is to have this ANSI certified and referenced by the U.S. Access Board.

    1. Definitions and Applicability – A note about other standards – certain kiosks may be subject to additional standards. Examples: Airport kiosks must comply with the standards defined by the Air Carrier Access Act. Kiosks procured for federal contracts (or purchased by some municipal and education customers) must comply with the Revised Section 508 Standards. ATMs 2010 ADA, etc.

    2. Functional Performance Criteria

      1. 302.1 thru 302.9
    3. Installation & Environment

    4. Clear Floor or Ground Space

    5. Closed Functionality

    6. Biometrics

    7. Privacy

    8. Standard Connections

    9. Operable Parts

      1. 407 Operable Parts
      2. 408 Display Screens
      3. 409 Status Indicators
      4. 410 Color Coding
      5. 411 Audible Signals
    10. Software

      1. General (501)
      2. Interoperability with Assistive (502)
      3. Captions 1.2.2
      4. Audio Description 1.2.3
      5. Contrast 1.4.3
      6. Low Audio 1.4.7
      7. No Background
      8. Focus Order
      9. Focus Visible
      10. Pointer Cancellation
      11. Target Size
      12. On Focus
      13. Error Identification
      14. Labels or Instructions
    11. Tactility, Voice Recognition and Speech Command

      1. Visual Display Screens
      2. Tactilely Discernible Controls.
      3. Alphabetic keys
      4. Numeric Keys
      5. Audible Output
      6. Voice Recognition and Speech Command
  3. Recommendations for distribution

      1. It is recommended that only ‘accessible’ kiosks be installed until 25% of the total kiosk population in any given location, grouping, common purpose or application meet Standards for Accessible Design

      2. This minimum kiosk population density applies to owned, jointly owned, leased, shared use, controlled, franchised or operated kiosks or other ICT terminals deployed in public spaces, public amenities and in places of public accommodation or service.

      3. To comply with the ACAA Standards for Accessible Design only ‘accessible’ kiosks should be installed until 25% of the kiosk population meets the requirements for Accessible Design.

      4. To comply with the ACAA, 25% of the kiosk population, located together for a common purpose(s), in a group, line or other configuration, must be compliant by December 12th 2022

  4. Acknowledgments –

    Contributing KMA sponsors – Olea Kiosks, KioWare, Nanonation, Pyramid, Frank Mayer, Vispero, ZIVELO, KIOSK Information Systems, DynaTouch, TurnKey Kiosks, 22 Miles, Peerless AV, Parabit Systems, Qwick Media, LG-MRI, Lexmark, Intel Corporation, AudioEye, PROVISIO, Kiosk Group, OptConnect, CSA Self-Service, Storm Interface, Tech For All, Mimo Monitors, UCP Unattended Payments, OTI Global and Evoke.

    Additional Consulted – IMPRESA, TouchPay, Acquire Digital, Self Service Networks, Panel Brite, TTCE, SEKO MedTec, Marathon, CUSTOM, TOKENWORKS, Insight Touch, Microcom, TECA, STEGO, Practical Automation, Ingenico, Esper. IO, Axiohm, TDS TOUCH, Evolis, BOCA Systems, URway Holdings, Alveni, Kiosk Innovations and Apriva. We also recognize multiple retailers, the RNIB (via proxy), NCR Dundee and the University of Maryland for their contributions.

  5. For more information

The KMA provides this information in complete form to any and all companies looking to deploy a self-service kiosk project or having deployed a self-service kiosk project.  For qualified deployers (state, local and federal agencies) a small administration fee of $249 is the only cost.  For manufacturers and vendors there is a separate pricing structure based on company size.  Contact craig@kma.global or call at 720-324-1837.

Writing a Kiosk RFP for Accessibility and Kiosk ADA compliance by TPG

How To Write an RFP for ADA Accessibility

Kiosk ADA Accessibility Nice article by TPG (Vispero) and Laura Miller on how to write an RFP for Accessibility. Here is the link.

Of Note

  • Screen reading software such as JAWS or other similar alternative is required. Screen reading software will provide the end user with non-visual access support that enables the user to hear the screen’s content spoken aloud. It accomplishes this by way of a tactile input device incorporated into the kiosk.

About TPG

TPG works with organizations around the world, including government agencies, technology vendors, and companies in a variety of industries including retail/eCommerce, software/technology, publishing, banking/finance, healthcare, and higher education. Our services continuum allows us to provide targeted expertise on specific projects or to engage as a strategic partner on long-term engagements. We believe that with our partners and customers, we can collectively create a global impact on advancing accessibility. Learn more about the people who inspire us to keep pushing forward.

Our Affiliations

We’re a member of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). We are on the W3C Advisory Board, and members of the TPG team chair the Web Platform and Pointer Events Working Groups, facilitate Task Forces on CSS Accessibility and Silver (Accessibility Guidelines), and are editors for specifications including HTML, HTML Accessibility API Mappings, SVG Accessibility API Mappings, and Pointer Events. We are a member of the Teach-Access initiative. Working in collaboration with Facebook, Yahoo!, Microsoft and others, TPG is involved in many activities designed to make accessibility an integral part of the higher-education curriculum – ensuring designers and developers enter the work-force with the accessibility knowledge they need.

For more information contact Vispero

 

Related Information

https://kioskindustry.org/accessible-kiosk-experience-by-vispero/

https://kioskindustry.org/vispero-storm-accessible-kiosk-solution/

https://kioskindustry.org/vispero-announcement/

ADA Kiosk Seminar on Three A’s – Access, Assist and Accommodate-

ADA Kiosk Seminar

Section 508 Webinars The next webinar in the Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series will take place September 27 from 1:00 to 2:30 (ET) and will cover accessibility to electronic and information technology, assistive technologies, and reasonable accommodations.

The Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series provides helpful information and best practices for federal agencies in meeting their obligations under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act which ensures access to electronic and information technology in the federal sector. This webinar series is made available by the Accessibility Community of Practice of the CIO Council in partnership with the U.S. Access Board.

ADA Kiosk Webinar – Upcoming webinar on hardware Section 508

ADA Kiosk Webinar ADA Kiosk Webinar

 

The next webinar in the Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series will take place July 25from 1:00 to 2:30 (ET) and review requirements for hardware, including mobile devices, in the updated Section 508 Standards that the U.S. Access Board published in January. Presenters will cover requirements for operable parts, technologies with two-way voice communication, devices with display screens, closed caption and audio description processing technologies, closed functionality, and privacy, among others.

For more details or to register for this or other webinars in the free series, visit www.accessibilityonline.org/cioc-508/schedule.

The Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series provides helpful information and best practices for federal agencies in meeting their obligations under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act which ensures access to information and communication technology in the federal sector. This webinar series is made available by the Accessibility Community of Practice of the CIO Council in partnership with the Access Board.

Section 508 Best Practices: Revised Section 508 Chapter 4 – Hardware
July 25, 2017, 1:00- 2:30 (ET)       Add to Calendar
Presenters:
• Bruce Bailey, IT Specialist, U.S. Access Board
• Timothy Creagan, Senior Accessibility Specialist, U.S. Access Board
• Deborah Kaplan, Section 508 Policy Lead, Office of the CIO, HHS (moderator)
Registration: https://www.accessibilityonline.org/cioc-508/session/?id=110614

Accessible Kiosk Experience by Vispero

JAWS kiosk video Freedom
Actual video down below. Click here to visit Freedom Scientific site and read complete article.

Excerpt News from cutting edge of accessibility and Freedom Scientific blog Jul2020 by  —

Nice blog article by Freedom Scientific along with a video demonstrating the use of JAWS kiosks software. Here is highlight of the article of JAWS kiosk and its features.

Providing accessibility functions to your entire user group be it customers at a kiosk, or employees working at home or at the office is important, and its the law.

JAWS Kiosk

Vispero’s JAWS Kiosk software is designed specifically to work with Storm’s Assistive Technology Products and other input devices to provide an accessible kiosk solution. Features of JAWS Kiosk include:

  • Auto start JAWS upon insertion of headphones
  • Auto stop/session when headphones are removed
  • Compatible with kiosk system software
  • Fully customizable through JAWS scripting
  • Full functionality even when an internet connection is not present
  • Custom welcome message
  • Multi-language/Multi-voice JAWS support
  • Standard keypad integration
  • Customized button functionality

Watch the JAWS Kiosk video to observe it in action.

Watch the JAWS Kiosk video

Self-Service Kiosk Association Board of Directors 2018

Self-Service Kiosk Manufacturer Association Board of Directors 2018

Check-in kiosk
Kiosk example. Click for full size – Austin image courtesy Olea Kiosk, Inc.

The Kiosk Manufacturer Association for Self-Service leads efforts to optimize self-service engagements & outcomes with retail technology such as self-serve order kiosks. PR Newswire link.

Kiosk Industry Group Association 

EASTLAKE, Colo., Feb. 20, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — The Kiosk Industry Association announces its Board of Directors for 2018. 17 companies serve in this capacity and help lead efforts to promote best practices, regulatory compliance in areas such as ADA and EMV in the self-order markets.

2018 Self-Service Kiosk Manufacturer Association Accomplishments

  • United States Access Board working relationship for ADA and Section 508 established with visit to Washington, D.C.
  • Establishment of ADA Committee and ADA Working Committee. Members include ATMIA, ETA and NCR from the financial and electronic transaction world.
  • Clarifying EMV requirements and liabilities for small business.
  • Working with top research firms such as Frost and Sullivan to help formulate accurate market research for the self-service market.
  • Global credentials enhanced with new Advisory Board member Pyramid who is major deployer of QSR fast order kiosks in Europe and expanding to the U.S.
  • Alliance media partners in UK and in China established.
  • Expanded coverage for Smart Cities, McDonalds type fast casual QSR and digital signage supplemental markets.
  • Helped create pure self-order financing model and sources for franchisees so that they can capitalize on new technologies incorporating facial recognition and artificial intelligence.
  • Established a Speakers Bureau to provide speakers for trade shows and seminars composed of industry veterans, deployers and providers both. Coinstar, Redbox, SoloHealth example given.
Examples of units – These are Pyramid units.

Newest Members of Kiosk Manufacturer Association for Self-Service Advisory Board

  • Pyramid – QSR and Self-Order kiosks
  • Storm Interface – Input devices and Assistive Technology such as Audio-Nav
  • Peerless AV – large format indoor and outdoor digital signage kiosks
  • CSA Kiosk – digital signage & interactive kiosks turnkey self-service solution

Kiosk Manufacturer Board of Directors for 2018 include:

Olea Kiosks – “Better kiosks through intelligent design.” A simple philosophy is our driving force. Building better kiosks starts with employing some of the most talented designers, engineers, and metal craftsmen in the American kiosk industry. After 3 generations of innovation, we remain a family-owned and operated company, with an unparalleled commitment to quality and service. https://olea.com

KioWare Olea Kiosks – We strongly believe that our success in the marketplace is due to our high commitment to customer service, which means many things to us. We pride ourselves on listening to our customers and turning their product requests into new features. Our efforts will always focus on improving the product and providing excellent customer care. https://kioware.com

iPadKiosks – Providing complete tablet kiosk systems from high-quality, ADA-compliant enclosures & stands to easy-to-use kiosk software. Backed by a full 3 year warranty! With over 30 years in designing interactive kiosks, we know what works. We’ve developed both hardware and software for hundreds of interpretive exhibits, transactional kiosks, sales exhibits, and training programs. https://www.ipadkiosks.com

Pyramid – building it – polytouch ® is the ultimate interactive kiosk solution for various industries and application areas for product presentation, independent processing of purchase processes and as an information terminal. Its individual and flexible application possibilities make the system a competitive advantage thanks to its first-class touch technology. Also, the ultrasound-based localization system PLS. With a precision of 15 cm, it is 10 times better than systems based on WLAN, Bluetooth or RFID technologies. In addition, PLS works with any standard smartphone. For users without a smartphone, low-cost mobile ultrasound transmitters – so-called pucks – are available as an alternative. https://www.pyramid-computer.com/home.html

KIOSK Information Systems – KIOSK leads the self-service industry in a full complement of vertical markets, providing niche expertise in both platform creation and volume deployment support. OEM and end customer projects range from traditional applications in retail; bill payment, and HR to highly custom multi-function banking, vending, smart locker and border security solutions. With over 200,000 units successfully deployed and 20-plus years entirely dedicated to the art of self-service, KIOSK has the passion, expertise, and resources to greatly simplify your path to market. https://www.kiosk.com

SlabbKiosks – leading international manufacturer of self-service, interactive kiosks, based in Las Vegas, Nevada. Their acquisition of Phoenix Kiosk and RedDotNet has allowed the company to not only expand their product offering, but also enhance their manufacturing capabilities. The company is able to complete over 250 projects per year, delivering thousands of kiosks from single prototypes to rollouts with a focus on innovation and affordability. Slabb’s experienced and responsive staff has over 100 years of combined industry experience allowing them to provide their clients with high quality, reliable, state-of-the-art products, support and services. Additional information can be found at www.slabbkiosks.com | www.usakiosks.com. https://www.slabbkiosks.com

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. – Frank Mayer and Associates is an industry leader in the creative design and manufacturing of branded in-store merchandising displays, interactive kiosks and store fixtures for leading consumer product companies and retailers. https://www.frankmayer.com

Impresa Financial – Impresa is an alternative lender exclusively focused on providing financing for digital kiosks and automated retail technology. https://www.impresafinancial.com

Source Technologies – Source Technologies’ award-winning self-service kiosks are designed from the ground-up to manage secure financial transactions such as bill payments and retail banking transactions with a focus on user experience, reliability and serviceability. Our Self-Service BillPay and Personal Teller Machines automate customer transactions, increase sales, cut labor costs and maximize customer loyalty and satisfaction.   https://www.sourcetech.com

Nanonation – Offering world-class solutions in interactive, digital signage, and transactional kiosks. Nanonation leverages 18 years of experience and an award-winning creative team to produce reliable and compelling public space solutions for multi-national corporations and small businesses alike.  https://www.nanonation.net

TurnKey Kiosks – TurnKey Kiosks produces innovative and reliable all-in-one kiosks, custom-built and tailored to best suit your business needs. Transactional Bill Pay is our core service. https://kioskindustry.org/kiosk-about/charter-sponsors/turnkey-kiosks

PROVISIO – Over 10,000 companies trust PROVISIO, the #1 secure kiosk browser. Software for safeguarding public access computers – secure kiosk browser protects the operating system from manipulation – included start screen templates & designs – optional digital-signage and remote management. https://www.provisio.com

OptConnect – is North America’s leading provider of managed service wireless connectivity for ATMs, Kiosks, Digital Signage and other custom applications. OptConnect revolutionizes the way machines communicate, providing for fast and secure connectivity, cost savings, and greater reliability. OptConnect offers end-to-end managed service providing customers with the greatest level of service and uptime. https://www.optconnect.com

ARCA – We provide technology and services to help people control cash in bank branches, retail stores and self-service kiosks. Cash recycling solutions. Learn more About Us.  https://www.arca.com

Storm Interface – Storm Interface manufacture heavy-duty keypads, keyboards and custom computer interface devices. All products are built to withstand rough use and abuse in unattended public and industrial applications. Storm also specializes in assistive technology for ADA. https://www.storm-interface.com

Peerless-AV – Professional – We proudly design and manufacture the highest quality products, ranging from outdoor displays to complete kiosk solutions, digital signage mounts to wireless systems. https://www.peerless-av.com/en-us/professional

CSA Self-Service – Kiosks & Digital Signage Solutions – CSA Self-Service Solutions is a premier self-service solutions provider focused on providing professional solutions that lower the total cost of ownership throughout the lifecycle. Our service operations expertise and professional nationwide workforce combined with our design & manufacturing capabilities provide our clients with the most complete self-service solutions in the industry. https://www.csakiosk.com

About the Kiosk Manufacturer Association for Self-Service (aka Kiosk Industry Group)

The Kiosk Industry Group is a news and marketing association for self-service and kiosk manufacturers. It is for the benefit of kiosk manufacturers, developers, resources and client companies who are involved in self-service transaction machines (SSTM). News about the industry and by the industry is published on our website when it is relevant to companies that deploy or may deploy self-service or to companies that support those deployers with hardware, software or applications. The Kiosk Industry Group has been active since 1995. Our audience this year on the website is 50,000 (human). Visit https://kioskindustry.org for more information.

Media Contact for Kiosk Manufacturer Association for Self-Service:

Craig Keefner
303-261-8836
craig@catareno.com

Related Images

polytouch.jpg 
Polytouch
Family of products from Pyramid

ipadkiosks.png 
iPadKiosks
Family of tablet products from iPadKiosks

image4.png

Related Links

Kiosk Manufacturers

About Kiosk Association

Related Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cx2Xekv_L38

SOURCE Kiosk Industry Group Association

Related Links

https://www.kioskindustry.org

Also from this source


Whitepaper – ADA kiosk, POS Terminal & Walmart

ADA Kiosk Whitepaper on ADA Kiosk, POS Terminal and Walmart

[Editor Note]  Thanks to Steve Taylor of Taylor Stands for the following information.

Recently Walmart had a ruling in California go against it in the case of improper ADA access for its self-checkout terminals.  Here is part of the argument which settled the case.  Walmart settled the case but we of course were interested in why.

POS terminals allow customers to input sensitive and private information in a secure manner such as their Personal Information Number (PIN); submit debit or credit card data by swiping a payment card; verify, authorize or cancel a transaction; submit a signature; provide the consumer with the option to select to receive cash-back from their account; select an amount of cash back to be provided; and perform other affiliated tasks which involve inputting, correcting, cancelling or entering information that is personal or affects access to personal information and finances.

POS terminals at most stores are mounted at inaccessible heights so that customers who use wheelchairs or scooters have to struggle to process their payment securely or cannot see the display screens or independently use the terminals. For years store owners have known (or not) of the discriminatory impact of its inaccessible POS terminals for its customers with mobility disabilities, yet continues to provide only, -inaccessible devices in many of its stores. A reliable accessible mounting solution for POS terminals are now readily available that provides secure, independent and equal access.

As a result of the height and positioning of POS terminals at typical stores, -to successfully complete a transaction, many customers in wheelchairs and scooters are forced to struggle with inaccessible equipment during the purchase/check-out process.

Customers with disabilities must stretch and strain just to try and see the information displayed on these screens and enter the necessary PIN or sign for a credit card transaction. Often, customers with disabilities cannot see all the information that is displayed. At times, customers with disabilities cannot enter their PIN or sign their signatures without great difficulty if at all. Conducting debit and credit card transactions requires many of these customers to request assistance from cashiers to input information
and/or provide signatures on their behalf.

Some customers with disabilities who do not wish to reveal private information to cashiers or have cashiers sign on their behalf are completely precluded from using the POS terminals at checkout stands at stores. These customers are required to either use cash, which they may not wish to do for a variety of reasons, or leave the store without purchasing any items.

ada kiosk regulations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTES:

Title III of the ADA entitles disabled individuals to the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, or accommodations of any place of public accommodation. 42 U.S.C. §12182(a).  LINK)

Title III prohibits public accommodations from excluding an individual with a disability or a class of individuals with disabilities on the basis of a disability or disabilities of such individual or class, from participating in or benefiting from the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages or
accommodations of the entity or otherwise discriminating against a person on the basis of disability. 42
U.S.C. § 12182(b)(1)(A)(i).  LINK)

Title III prohibits public accommodations from affording an individual or class of individuals with a disability, on the basis of a disability or disabilities of such individual or class, with the opportunity to participate in or benefit from a good, service, facility, privilege, advantage, or accommodation that is not equal to that afforded other individuals. 42 U.S.C. § 12182(b)(1)(A)(ii). LINK)

Title III prohibits public accommodations from providing an individual or class of individuals, on the basis of a disability or disabilities of such individual or class, with a good, service, facility, privilege, advantage, or accommodation that is different or separate from that provided to other individuals. 42 U.S.C. §12182(b)(1)(A)(iii). LINK)

Title III provides that goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations shall be afforded to an individual with a disability in the most integrated setting appropriate to the needs of the individual. 42 U.S.C. § 12182(b)(l)(B).  LINK)

Title III provides that an individual with a disability shall not be denied the opportunity to participate in such programs or activities that are not separate or different. 42 U.S.C. § 12182(b)(1)(C). LINK)

Title III defines discrimination to include the failure of a public accommodation to make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures, when such modifications are necessary to afford such goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages or accommodations to individuals with disabilities; to take such steps as may be necessary to ensure that no individual with a disability is excluded, denied
services, segregated or otherwise treated differently that other individuals because of the absences of auxiliary aids and services; and to remove architectural barriers that are structural in nature, in existing facilities where such removal is readily achievable. 42 U.S.C. §12182(b)(2)(A)(ii)-(iv).  LINK)

Title III further defines discrimination as a public accommodation’s failure to design and construct
facilities that are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities (later than 30 months
after July 26, 1990) and, with respect to a facility or part thereof that is altered by, on behalf of, or for the use of an establishment in a manner that affects or could affect the usability of the facility or part thereof, a failure to make alterations in such a manner that, to the maximum extent feasible the altered portions of the facility are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities. 42 U.S.C. § 12183(a)(1)-(2).  LINK)

A place of public accommodation. See 42 U.S.C. § 12181(7)(E).  Link)

Merchants who violate Title III of the ADA by failing to make reasonable modifications to its policies, practices, or procedures to ensure that POS terminals are accessible to customers with mobility disabilities can face fines and an Accessibility TITLE III lawsuit.

Merchants who violate Title III of the ADA by failing to remove barriers to its POS terminals should have removal of such barriers to become readily achievable. A person who sues is likely entitled to injunctive relief. 42 U.S.C. § 12888. LINK)

IF IN CALIFORNIA:

A permanent injunction pursuant to the ADA and the Unruh Act requiring a merchant to institute and implement policies and procedures that ensure that individuals in wheelchairs or scooters have on discriminatory, full and equal independent access to POS terminals so that they may use credit or debit cards to conduct non-cash transactions when purchasing retail goods.

More Information

FactSheet_AB1521

More about Taylor Stands — visit their website

JAWS Kiosk – Mitigate Your Website Liability

From the THEPACIELLOGROUP website and Matt Ater  — March 2020

Editors Note:  It is a fact that more than ever before companies are relying on the website to service customers.  But are all customers being served?  Liability for accessibility is the #1 concern for corporate websites. Let Vispero help guide you.

Kiosk Accessibility: Selecting the Correct Input Device

Posted on Thursday, 5 March 2020 by Matt Ater of Vispero
Extended Functionality AudioNav
Extended Functionality AudioNav, 9 Keys, USB 1409-34013, https://www.storm-interface.com

One of the key things to consider when striving to make your kiosk accessible is selecting the appropriate input device. Unsurprisingly, a touch screen may not be the right input for people with disabilities. While someone may be able to use an iPhone touch screen, it doesn’t mean they can navigate a self-service kiosk with touch screen navigation. Instead, other methods of input must be identified in order to allow someone to successfully interact with the kiosk.

We know that many ATMs use touch screens today. Additionally, they have also incorporated a (numeric) telephone keypad. Some even have additional buttons located on the sides of the screens. When using an ATM, a person who is blind would initiate the use of the keypad by inserting headphones. This turns on the text to speech mode and allows for interaction to occur through the numeric keypad instead of the touch screen. The customer will be given options like “press 1 for withdraw” and “would you like a receipt? Press 1 for Yes and 2 for No”.

In this scenario, it makes sense in an ATM to use a numeric keypad. If the user needs to type in numbers, they are at their fingertips.

Let’s look at something more complex. If a user were to utilize a self-service kiosk to check-in at the airport, it may be more useful to include arrow keys and a select key. The user would still need a headphone jack for the text to speech. There are several commonly used input devices by Storm Interface used at airports today.

I recently used one of these airline kiosks to check-in to my flight and check a bag. I won’t discuss the overall experience of the check-in process and some of the accessibility issues in this post, rather maintaining my focus on the input device available. One of the screens had a “select your destination airport” input. As a low vision user, this required me to use right or left arrows to navigate through the alphabet and press select on the three letters of my airport code. This input option was suitable, though it did take some time to complete. In this scenario, with limited input needs, it is not practical to provide a QWERTY keyboard for data input.

Next, let’s discuss quick serve restaurant (QSR) kiosk experiences. In this example, you have a kiosk which displays menus that change throughout the day, depending on the meal being served. Let’s imagine a user wants to select a breakfast sandwich and a cup of coffee. The screen has 10 choices on the left. One of the choices is breakfast. In this case a user who is blind or has low vision could use something like the AudioNav or AudioNav EF for data input. Both have small footprints and include a headphone jack. They have Arrow keys with a Select key in the middle. The user could press the Right Arrow to move forward until they hear “Breakfast”. Once they press the Select button, they would have 25 different items to choose from. The Right Arrow could be used again until they hear the filter for breakfast sandwiches. Again, the Right Arrow is pressed until they hear “Sandwich” and press the Select key again. If the customer uses headphones and the kiosk is enabled with text to speech, they should hear “one breakfast sandwich added to your cart”. This example shows how using something with Arrow keys and a Select key will allow the user to move through a self-service application such as a QSR app.

What other types of input could you encounter?

Storm Interface Audio-Enabled Nav-Pad
NAV-PAD™, 8 KEYS, USB INTERFACE, AUDIO PROCESSOR Product code: EZ08-23001, https://www.storm-interface.com

Let’s consider a healthcare clinic. If a patient were to check into a healthcare clinic via a self-service kiosk, it is likely they would be entering a significant amount of personal data. In this case they may be required to their name, birth date, medical number, and more. A touchscreen with onscreen keyboard would not be a good option for this type of entry. Instead, the kiosk should include a QWERTY keyboard and headphone jack for audio.

Kiosk deployers will want to do proper testing with end-users on the selection of an appropriate QWERTY keyboard. Important features for the keyboard to include may be proper markings on home row keys. Additionally, arrow keys should have proper spacing around them.

Where might you use a numeric or telephone keypad on a kiosk?

A numeric keypad may be useful in ticket or theater kiosks. Many theaters today require patrons to select a seat when purchasing a ticket. In this case it may make sense to explore alternative input devices, such as a numeric or telephone keypad with a headphone jack. This input option would be similar to the one found at an ATM, where pressing numbers on the keypad allows the user to make a selection.

The primary thing to consider when selecting an input device for self-service kiosk use is to understand the kiosk application workflow and what type of user interaction and input will be required. Ensure that testing includes people with disabilities. In addition, it is important that the application is tested for functional accessibility and all input and selection items should meet WCAG AA.

Take a look at JAWS Kiosk and what it offers.
Read more about kiosk accessibility from the JAWS Kiosk team.


Need help with your specific accessibility needs? Contact Us

Kiosk Accessibility Patient Kiosks

Read full article at Paciello Group March 2020

Healthcare kiosks are, now more than ever, a valuable tool for serving more patients without the need for up close staff interaction. They can be used for checking in patients and gathering symptom information for efficient triage purposes. They can also be used to measure patient blood pressure or heart rate, temperature, and other diagnostic information. Moreover, healthcare kiosks are also helpful for educating patients, collecting health insurance information, and scheduling future services.

Making a healthcare kiosk accessible not only improves patient care, but is required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities regarding public accommodations and the court has defined public accommodation to include (in title III) service establishments including healthcare facilities.

Creating an accessible healthcare kiosk

Disabilities, according to the ADA, can be physical (motor skills), cognitive (intellectual), low to no vision, low to no hearing, and more. But before addressing software accessibility, the first step to creating an accessible healthcare kiosk should be to make the kiosk physically accessible. The ability to access the kiosk by users in a wheelchair is required by the ADA.  It outlines specific compliance guidelines like the height of operable parts, the viewing angle, and the approach area for accessing the kiosk — which must also be accessible via a wheelchair. The approach area requires a clear path without stairs, uneven flooring, or objects to obstruct access.

Once physical accessibility has been established, turn your attention to another an equally important component: software. The kiosk application must also be accessible for use by someone who is blind or has low vision. The kiosk needs to have a screen reader, such as JAWS® for kiosk to turn text to speech. Some examples of accessible kiosks can be found in this video.

Touchscreens may be difficult for people with disabilities, so an external input/navigation device is also useful to allow users to engage with a kiosk without using a touchscreen.  The kiosk application must be developed to ensure it can be easily navigated and understood when read through a screen reader. WCAG 2.1 AA standards are application and website guidelines for accessibility. Following those guidelines with a healthcare check-in app, for instance, will make it easier for a blind or low vision user to understand and navigate the kiosk app. Learn more about selecting the right input device for your accessible kiosk.

Some things to consider when planning your accessible healthcare kiosk

  1. What application will you be using? Is it already accessible? If yes, can you improve usability for kiosk users?
  2. Is the kiosk hardware ADA compliant for height and reach specifications?
  3. Does the kiosk include an input device that has an audio jack? Oftentimes, there is no effect on audio jacks built in audio jacks when headphones are inserted. Using an input device that includes an audio jack will allow JAWS to turn off and on based on the presence of the headphones.
  4. Are you providing all information in a way that is accessible to all users, including those who are deaf or hard of hearing, and those who are blind or who have low vision? That includes any PDFs that are being read on the screen, videos in need of captioning, and document signing for HIPAA compliance.
  5. Are you protecting user privacy at every turn?

Read full article at Paciello Group March 2020

Press Release – Kiosk Manufacturer Association (KMA) Announces New Accessibility Committee Chairpersons

From PRNewswire March 2020

WESTMINSTER, Colo.March 4, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Kiosk Manufacturer Association aka KMA announces our new ADA and Accessibility Chairpersons.  Serving as co-chairpersons for our committee is Randy Amundson of Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. and Mr. Peter Jarvis of Storm Interface.  Randy is one of our founding chairpersons and is continuing in his support of KMA and ADA. Peter is a charter sponsor of the Accessibility Committee and now helps lead the way for the KMA.

From Randy Amundson, “Peter Jarvis and I continue to work closely in finalizing the Kiosk Accessibility Code of Practice (CoP). We feel that the CoP will be a useful tool that kiosk manufacturers and their clients can use to ensure that their kiosks are accessible to the widest population of people with some form of disability possible. Peter and I are also working on developing an independent standard that can be used by nationally recognized testing labs in order to certify a kiosk as being ADA compliant”.

Peter Jarvis adds, “First, let me thank the committee’s previous Co-Chair Laura Miller for her work in raising awareness of accessibility issues within the kiosk industry. Laura continues to make an outstanding contribution to the work of the KMA Accessibility Committee but has now stepped into a role dedicated to kiosk accessibility at Vispero. Her commitment, to ensure equality in access to information, services and products, continues to influence the committee’s objectives. As the new Co-Chair (serving the KMA’s European members) I hope to continue the initiatives of the committee and look forward to working with the committee’s US resident Chairperson Randy Amundson.”

We very much thank Laura Boniello Miller with Vispero our founding co-chairperson for her contributions, support and effort over the last two years.

Visit with the KMA at the upcoming CSUN conference as well as at MURTEC. In May we will be exhibiting at the National Restaurant Show.

Current KMA News

KMA member news

If your company, organization, association, local, city, state or federal agency would like to participate at some level with the KMA either with ADA or with EMV, please contact craig@kma.global or call 720-324-1837

Thanks for the generous financial support of our GOLD sponsors Olea Kiosks | KioWare | Nanonation | Pyramid | Frank Mayer | Vispero | Zebra  | ZIVELO

SOURCE Kiosk Manufacturer Association

Related Links

kma.global

CSUN 2020 Conference – Kiosks Assistive Technology

CSUN 2020 Conference – Kiosks

From CSUN website Feb 2020

KMA at CSUN

JAWS ADA Logo This March 11th-13th, Vispero will be leading multiple presentations on kiosk accessibility at CSUN’s Annual Accessibility Conference being held in Anaheim, CA. Vispero’s Vice President and subject matter expert Matt Ater, will lead a panel of kiosk accessibility experts on “Lessons Learned from Developing Accessible Kiosks”. The panel will include KMA Accessibility Board co-chair Peter Jarvis, Senior Executive VP at Storm Interface, among others. Kiosk accessibility and usability will be discussed in a presentation called “Kiosk Accessibility: Understanding the Kiosk User Experience”, kiosk industry veteran Laura Boniello Miller and usability expert Rachael Bradley Montgomery will discuss the perspective of the kiosk user and how deployers can best accommodate users with disabilities.  Vispero’s Ryan Jones will lead a session, “JAWS Kiosk: What Is It and When Would I Use It” to assist in using the JAWS screen reader in accessible kiosk deployments. Along with the presentations you can visit the Vispero booths  in the Marquis Ballroom, #503, #603, and #703 to see accessible kiosks in action, including kiosks from Olea, Pyramid and SeePoint.  Vispero will also be hosting an accessible Escape Room, and on-site registration will be available using an accessible kiosk powered by JAWS, located in the Vispero Showcase Suite.

Vispero has added support for the new Storm Assistive Technology device, the new Extended Functionality AudioNav. JAWS will continue to support the Storm AudioNav and other assistive technology devices by Storm as they are added.

Reception

Mark your calendars for this year’s Keynote Address at the Conference which will be held March 10, Tuesday evening, at 5:30 pm. A Welcome Reception will follow the Keynote Address.

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Rory Cooper will be the Keynote Speaker for this year’s conference. Dr. Rory A. Cooper holds several prestigious positions including Associate Dean for Inclusion and FISA & Paralyzed Veterans of America Distinguished Professor of Rehabilitation Science and Technology and Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. He is also the Founding Director and the VA Senior Research Career Scientist at the Human Engineering Research Laboratories. He holds an adjunct professorship at the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University and is also a Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland.

A prolific writer, he has published over 300 peer-reviewed articles and three books, including the award-winning Care of the Combat Amputee. He has over 25 patents awarded or pending. Dr. Cooper’s students have been the recipients of over 50 national and international awards. A Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors and other scholarly organizations, he is the recipient of the Secretary of Defense Meritorious Civilian Service Medal.

In May of this year, he was honored in Washington, D.C., at the Smithsonian Institute Museum of American History with a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office inventor trading card and portrait.

Dr. Cooper’s contributions are impressive and numerous.  The Keynote Address should be an enlightening and rewarding talk to kick off the 2020 CSUN Conference.

CSUN Exhibits

Come to the 2020 Exhibit Hall and experience first-hand the cutting-edge assistive technology offered in over 100 booths. For 34 years, thousands have attended the CSUN Conference’s free Exhibit Hall to have the opportunity to directly interact with the providers who develop the technology, products and services designed to promote inclusion for people with disabilities.

The Exhibit Hall is located in the Grand Ballroom and Marquis Ballroom on the lobby level of the hotel.  Be one of the first to explore the latest innovative technology when doors open on Wednesday, March 11 at 12:00 pm.  We also welcome you to attend the Exhibit Hall Opening Reception at 12:30 pm.

Vispero

Address
17757 US Hwy 19 N
Ste 560
Clearwater, FL 33764
United States
Phone
800-444-4443
Fax
727-471-7931
Company Email
Info@Vispero.com
Website
http://www.vispero.com
Description
Vispero™ is the world’s leading assistive technology provider for the visually impaired. We have a long history of developing and providing innovative solutions for blind and low vision individuals that help them reach their full potential. At Vispero, we inspire hope, determination, and independence through our family of brands: Freedom Scientific, Enhanced Vision, Optelec, and The Paciello Group.
Booths
503 (Marquis Ballroom), 603 (Marquis Ballroom), 703 (Marquis Ballroom)
Categories
  • Agencies/Services
  • Alternative Input/Keyboard Devices
  • Blind/Low Vision
  • Educational Software
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Software

More Vispero News

Storm and Vispero Collaboration
JAWS Kiosk Software

Disabled Access – How Self-Service Kiosks Can Help Hotels, Restaurants Better Serve the Disabled

Self-Service Kiosks for Hotels, Restaurants

Article on Hospitality Tech by Vispero Feb 2020

By Laura Boniello Miller, Corporate Business Development Manager for the JAWS Kiosk program at Vispero, parent company of The Paciello Group – 02/26/2020

People with disabilities travel and dine out just like everyone else. Research conducted by the Open Doors Organization in 2015 found that “more than 26 million adults with disabilities traveled for pleasure and/or business, taking 73 million trips.” This spending has a significant impact on the travel industry, but sometimes the technology employed by hotels and restaurants is not accommodating to people with disabilities. This offers hospitality an excellent opportunity to employ self-service technology that will improve their disabled guest’s experience and capture more of their spending power with accommodations and services that support this group.

Read full article

Jaws Kiosk – Vispero Storm Collaborate on Accessible Kiosk Solution

 

Gold Sponsor – Vispero – ADA Accessibility Software Consultant

JAWS Kiosk

JAWS Kiosk

JAWS kiosk
Jaws Kiosk by The Paciello Group and Vispero

Vispero®, the world’s leading assistive technology provider for the visually impaired, is excited to announce an addition to the Vispero family: JAWS Kiosk. A collaboration between The Paciello Group (TPG) and the Freedom Scientific brand (owned by Vispero), JAWS Kiosk is focused on delivering accessible kiosk solutions whether it’s through the incorporation of Freedom Scientific’s industry-leading screen reading software, JAWS®, or by utilizing TPG’s accessible design and technical implementation services. Beginning with the June 2019 release of JAWS, JAWS software will revolutionize self-service kiosk accessibility.

JAWS Kiosk for Accessibility

“Kiosk accessibility has always been a consideration but is becoming a standard rather than a ‘nice to have.’ In order to meet this growing demand, the kiosk team leverages industry-leading accessibility software from Freedom Scientific, expert consulting capabilities of The Paciello Group, and a strong kiosk industry knowledge base,” explains Matt Ater, Vice President of Business Development at Vispero and a subject matter expert on user experience when developing solutions for people who are blind or have low vision.

JAWS Kiosk Features

JAWS has been modified in order to meet the specific needs of an accessible kiosk deployment. New kiosk-specific features of JAWS include:

  • Thinner version of JAWS for closed environments
  • Locked down features for use in closed environments
  • Support for Storm Assistive Technology Products (NavPad™, NavBar ™ and AudioNav™)
  • Multi-language/Multi-voice JAWS support
  • User session management
  • Auto start JAWS upon insertion of audio device
  • Session end is automated upon withdraw of audio input (Auto Stop)
  • Compatible with kiosk system software
  • Fully customizable through JAWS scripting
  • Does not require an internet connection for full functionality

“Storm Interface are proud to be working in cooperation with TPG and JAWS Kiosk”, said Storm’s SEVP Peter Jarvis. “The application of Storm Assistive Technology Products (NavPad™, NavBar™ and AudioNav™), fully supported and integrated within JAWS, will bring a new dimension of accessibility and a powerful contribution to independent living. A truly impressive combination!”

Spearheading this initiative is Laura Boniello Miller, who recently joined Vispero after spending the past six years driving strategic sales for KioWare Kiosk Software where she built partnerships with kiosk hardware manufacturers, kiosk device manufacturers, and kiosk application developers. Laura is a past co-chairperson of the Kiosk Manufacturer’s Association Accessibility working group and an author of multiple articles on the accessible kiosk user experience. According to Miller, “Vispero is committed to the kiosk accessibility space and now brings kiosk experience to these efforts. The kiosk team leverages JAWS software and The Paciello Group’s accessibility expertise to help customers create a complete accessible kiosk solution.”

Learn more at www.paciellogroup.com/products/jaws-kiosk/. Contact Laura Boniello Miller at lmiller@vispero.com

About Vispero: Vispero is the global leader for assistive technology and accessibility solutions. Freedom Scientific® and The Paciello Group, both Vispero brands, have a long history of innovation for customers with accessibility needs. Freedom Scientific is the leading provider of assistive technology products for those with vision impairments, offering brands such as the market leading screen reader JAWS for Windows and ZoomText screen magnifier. The Paciello Group is an accessibility solutions provider passionately dedicated to helping organizations make their technology equally accessible to all people. Other Vispero brands include Enhanced Vision and Optelec. For more information, visit www.vispero.com.


About TPG team

TPG partners with organizations around the world, to provide them with both strategic and targeted expertise that enables them to realise their accessibility goals. With our partners we believe we can create a positive impact on global accessibility.

Vispero ADA kiosk solution

Integrating Storm Keypad

https://www.storm-interface.com/news?id=49

Announcing the newest addition to Vispero: JAWS Kiosk
https://www.paciellogroup.com/news/2019/09/announcing-the-newest-addition-to-vispero-jaws-kiosk/

Self Service Kiosk FAQ by Frank Mayer & Associates, Inc.

Common Self-Service Kiosk Questions

Self-service kiosks continue to rise in popularity as a powerful tool benefiting businesses’ customer experience strategies.  With this surge in interest comes more inquiries about everything from payment options to ADA compliance.  Below, we’ve compiled a list of the most common self-service kiosk questions and their answers.

Why should my quick-service restaurant invest in self-service kiosks?

Self-service kiosks offer significant advantages to QSRs and fast casuals.  Not only do kiosks shorten wait times at checkout counters, but data shows kiosks can increase average ticket orders up to 30 percent due to cross-selling capabilities and the privacy units offer customers during the ordering process.  In addition, labor can be diverted to more customer-focused duties like expediting food or cleaning, which can directly impact your customer’s experience at your establishment. As more restaurants invest in the technology, patrons will expect their favorite QSRs and fast casuals to offer the same efficiency and convenience being offered elsewhere.

I’m not a restaurant.  Does my business need self-service kiosks, too?

Yes!  While self-service kiosks have been highly visible in the QSR industry, countless other verticals can utilize the benefits of this technology, too.  From wayfinding to registration capabilities, self-service kiosks offer unlimited opportunities for other industries like automotivegroceryhome improvementretailhospitalitycannabis dispensaries, and more.  In fact, having self-service technology can serve as a competitive advantage in a demanding retail landscape where the customer experience is a valued performance indicator. Make sure you’re setting yourselves apart from other businesses in your industry.

What kind of payment is accepted at a self-order kiosk?  Do kiosks accept cash?

There are a variety of payment options available for kiosks, and which ones to utilize depend on a business’ needs.  Most restaurant self-service kiosks accept credit cards and offer a “pay at the counter” choice for customers paying with cash.  However, as more QSRs and fast casuals explore kiosk programs, many are employing cash dispensing hardware to offer the full self-order experience and eliminate the need for patrons to stop at the counter.

For other industries, payment options vary. Wayfinding kiosks may skip payment hardware altogether as their objectives are strictly to provide information and directions. And while it’s well-known that cannabis dispensaries are often cash-only, new payment and banking options could make credit card swipes common at dispensary kiosks in the future.

Does my kiosk need to be ADA compliant?

ADA compliance is an important factor to consider when planning a self-service program as it protects your business from expensive lawsuits and, more importantly, guarantees the entire public can independently interact with your kiosks.  Wheelchair accessibility is a common discussion when planning kiosks, but did you know there are numerous assistive technology products designed to support people with disabilities that make it difficult to see, read, hear, or interact with touch screen displays?

Currently, the Kiosk Manufacturer Association is working with the US Federal Access Board to implement a new Code of Practice for the kiosk industry, ensuring better clarification on mandates that apply to the self-service kiosk industry. Read more about that here.

Can I also place my self-service kiosk outdoors?

Self-service kiosks are designed differently to withstand the environmental factors that come with being placed outside.  In these instances, the structures must be designed and engineered to be weather-resistant, secure, durable and safe for all outdoor conditions.

If you’re looking to utilize self-service kiosks outside, you’ll need to keep in mind that outdoor kiosks can cost much more than that of an indoor kiosk.  This is because these kiosks must be more durable, watertight, and insulated as well as include hardware components that are rated and ruggedized for the outdoors. Touch screens need to be easily read in direct sunlight, and the exterior must handle exposure to heavy wind, rain, and more.  Additionally, mounting will need to be factored in along with climate control inside the kiosk to maintain temperature and humidity.

When considering an outdoor option, make sure you’re aware of all the variables associated with ensuring a successful deployment.

What features should I consider when deciding on a self-service kiosk?

Deciding how a kiosk will be used will help determine what hardware will need to be present on your kiosk.  If you plan to allow payment transactions, a printer, payment device, and possible cash recycler will be needed.  Businesses that have loyalty programs will also want to make sure a barcode scanner is available to customers.

In addition, kiosk sizes, formats, and screen size will all depend on floor space and intended function.  For instance, a wall kiosk or floor standing tablet makes sense for a business with limited real estate, while a counter tablet with a smaller screen lends itself well to check-in capabilities or instances where privacy might be imperative.  It’s important to discuss your kiosk program goals, intended uses, and physical location requirements with your self-service kiosk manufacturer when you start your initial planning phase.

Will a self-service kiosk integrate with my point-of-sale system?

Fortunately, many kiosk software providers are fully capable of interfacing with different point-of-sale systems because they contain open APIs that work with the major systems.  The only caveat might be if a POS system itself is not open to interfacing with other software programs.  This can be the case for older legacy POS systems, or, to a lesser extent, modern POS systems where the vendor has opted to close off third-party software communications.  When looking into a self-service kiosk program, kiosk-POS integration should be discussed early in the planning stages.

Do you still have a self-service kiosk question that wasn’t answered here?  We have kiosk experts who can help guide you through the process and answer any additional questions you might have.  Contact them at info@frankmayer.com to get started!

More by Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.

Retail Marketing Psychology – Frank Mayer

Frank Mayer at ICX Summit

AudioEye and Duda Launch First Digital Accessibility Partnership for Large-Scale CMS

Partnership enables more than 500,000 website customers to easily and affordably achieve legal compliance for digital accessibility

TUCSON, Ariz., January 21, 2020 — AudioEye, Inc. (NASDAQ: AEYE), an industry-leading software solution delivering website accessibility compliance to businesses of all sizes, has announced a partnership with Duda, the leading web design platform for companies that offer web design services to small businesses.

WCAG Conformance

With this partnership, AudioEye is now one of five site-enhancing tools, and the only digital accessibility solution, integrated into the newly launched Duda App Store. This native integration now makes it possible for the more than 6,000 digital agencies and solutions providers to create legally compliant, fully accessible websites for hundreds of thousands of customers that help ensure barrier-free access for everyone, regardless of their individual abilities. Trusted by some of the largest and most influential businesses and organizations in the world, AudioEye provides an always-on testing, remediation, and monitoring solution that continually improves conformance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

“By enabling any website on the Duda platform to quickly turn on AudioEye with a click of a button, Duda has elevated the importance of digital inclusion with their customers, placing website accessibility on a level playing field with other essential and familiar website solutions for businesses such as SEO, CRM, SMS marketing, and several other fully integrated tools. Given their target customer base, this is the ideal positioning for the AudioEye solution,” said AudioEye Chief Strategy Officer and Co-Founder Sean Bradley. “This partnership represents a tremendous step forward for AudioEye in its mission to eradicate all barriers to digital access, and we are honored to partner with like-minded companies like Duda who also prioritize digital inclusion.”

Accessibility SaaS On-Demand

“We’re continuously innovating our platform to ensure we provide our digital agency and SaaS  customers with the tools needed to create the most modern, feature-rich, responsive websites available. This includes sites that are accessible to individuals of all abilities, which is why we are proud to now offer AudioEye’s industry-leading solution,” said Duda CEO Itai Sadan.

According to a recent Duda survey, more than 60-percent of clients have asked about web accessibility in the past year, with legal compliance being the most prominent motivator. In the United States, digital accessibility-related lawsuits have increased significantly over the past five years, with more than 2,000 lawsuits filed in federal court in 2018 and 2019, consecutively. This trend shows no sign of slowing in 2020. Overwhelmingly, courts are siding with accessibility. Recently, the Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal from the international pizza restaurant chain, Domino’s, upholding a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Decision in favor of accessibility. Internationally, more and more governments continue to establish or reinforce their own accessibility laws, which most commonly harmonize with WCAG. With AudioEye on a website, businesses significantly reduce their risk of a costly, time-consuming digital accessibility-related lawsuit.

AudioEye Pro and Managed are now available on the Duda App Store:

  • AudioEye Pro: best for freelancers who want to harness the power of AudioEye to manage website accessibility on their own using AudioEye’s developer tools. AudioEye Pro couples machine-learning automation with free developer tools. AudioEye’s always-on technology identifies WCAG errors, fixing some of the most common issues in real-time, while developer tools assist site owners in fixing remaining issues. AudioEye Pro includes scanning and monitoring and access to digital accessibility training and customer-only webinars. Pro also provides customers an Accessibility Statement, showing site visitors a commitment to digital accessibility, as well as a 24/7 Help Desk to report any accessibility issues encountered.
  • AudioEye Managed: ideal for agencies managing multiple websites who prefer to rely on AudioEye to ensure accessibility standards are met. AudioEye Managed provides a fully managed, comprehensive, speed-to-compliance digital accessibility solution. Managed enhances patented machine-learning technology with manual testing and engineering to deliver to site-specific remediations. Managed builds on the benefits of Pro adding the AudioEye Trusted Certification, verifying a site’s ongoing legal compliance with official documentation to assist in responding to any accessibility complaints or legal threats.

Both Pro and Managed customers also receive the AudioEye Accessibility Toolbar, which includes a set of personalization tools for site visitors to customize their site experience. Examples include adjusting color contrast, changing a site’s font or font size, disabling animations, and more.

About AudioEye
AudioEye is an industry-leading software solution delivering immediate ADA and WCAG accessibility compliance at scale. Through patented technology, subject matter expertise and proprietary processes, AudioEye is eradicating all barriers to digital accessibility, helping creators get accessible and supporting them with ongoing advisory and automated upkeep. Trusted by the FCC, ADP, SSA, Uber, and more, AudioEye helps everyone identify and resolve issues of accessibility and enhance user experiences, automating digital accessibility for the widest audiences. AudioEye stands out among its competitors because it delivers Machine Learning/AI-driven accessibility without fundamental changes to site architecture. Join our movement at www.audioeye.com.

About Duda
Duda is the leading web design platform for all companies that offer web design services to small businesses. The company serves all types of customers, from freelance web professionals and digital agencies, all the way up to the largest hosting companies, SaaS platforms and online publishers in the world.

Duda was founded by Itai Sadan and Amir Glatt in 2009, and raised a $25 million growth equity round from Susquehanna Growth Equity (SGE) in 2019. Based in Palo Alto, California, it currently hosts more than 15 million websites and was named PCMag’s Editors’ Choice website builder in 2017, 2018 and 2019. 

Media Contacts:
AudioEye:
Rachel Sales
Silicon Valley Communications
(347) 601-5350
rachel@siliconvpr.com

Investor Contact:
Matt Glover or Tom Colton
AEYE@gatewayir.com
(949) 574-3860

Duda:
Christopher Carfi
Duda VP of Content & Product Marketing
1-775-442-4740
chris@duda.co

Kiosk Interactivity Redefined – Kiosk Voice Recognition and Voice Command

Voice response promises to add a new interactivity for self-service devices, but there are some hurdles that will need to be overcome.

By Richard Slawsky contributor

When we think of interactive kiosks, what typically comes to mind is the touch-enabled displays that are a nearly ubiquitous component of today’s self-service devices. Trained in part by the tap, pinch and swipe actions that are the main feature of smartphones, we’ve come to expect to be able to interact with kiosks through touch. Although touch-enabled displays have been around in one form or another for more than 50 years, it’s only recently that they have become mainstream thanks in part to Apple’s introduction of the iPhone. 

Over the past few years, though, the concept of interactivity has taken on a new dimension. Driven in part by home automation devices such as Amazon’s Echo and Google’s Home, people are becoming increasingly comfortable with a new way of interacting with self-service devices: by voice.

A growing number of technology vendors have been introducing voice-enabled kiosks over the past few years. The question remains, though: what does the future hold for interactive voice response and what needs will it fill when it comes to interactive kiosks?

Challenges slowing adoption

Simply put, an interactive voice response system is a computer interface that accepts input by voice rather than mouse, keyboard or touch. The technology has been around at least since the 1970s but has become increasingly widespread as large organizations deploy such systems to handle customer service. And when combined with artificial intelligence, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish VR from communication with a live person.

When it comes to self-service kiosks, a quick Internet search shows dozens of vendors offering devices outfitted with a VR interface. Such interfaces are touted as a way to provide access for those with limited hand mobility as well as those who can’t read. As is the case with on-screen touch menus. It’s relatively easy to incorporate a variety of languages into VR, allowing the deployer to serve those with a limited command of English.

But while the technology improves on nearly a daily basis, it may be a while before VR-enabled kiosks become commonplace. One of the key reasons is that deploying VR will mean either retrofitting existing kiosks with new hardware or deploying new devices outfitted with the technology.

“Voice recognition is ready for kiosks and companies like Zivelo are already looking at ways to begin rolling the technology out on a wider scale,” said Rob Carpenter, CEO and Founder of Valyant AI, an enterprise-grade conversational AI platform for the quick-serve restaurant industry. 

“The biggest hindrance to adoption and scale is going to be the inclusion of microphones and speakers in kiosks, which are required for conversational AI, but hadn’t been included in past hardware iterations because they weren’t needed at the time,” Carpenter said.

The environment where the kiosk will be located will also be a consideration.

“It’ll be important to look at the hardware’s ability to handle conversational AI (it’ll need embedded microphones and speakers), but it’s also important to consider the noise level in the environments,” Carpenter said.

“Conversational AI might struggle in high traffic areas like airports where there is so much noise it’s hard for the AI to hear the customer,” he said. “It’s very likely that for the highest and best use of conversational AI in kiosks, it may also require other capabilities like lip reading and triangulating the customer in a physical space to separate out disparate noise channels.”

As such, deployers will need to incorporate design considerations that include microphone arrays focused on specific areas where a user might be standing. They’ll also need to incorporate design considerations beyond the kiosk itself, including noise-absorbing carpet and walls in the area where the device will be located.

Privacy Concerns

Privacy concerns will come into play as well. Amazon’s Echo devices, for example, store a record of what they hear when activated. And while such recording is only supposed to occur when the user says a “wake” word such as Alexa, anyone who owns such a device knows similar words can prompt a wakeup as well. In addition, when someone is using a VR-enabled kiosk there’s a distinct possibility that nearby sounds will be picked up and recorded as well.

“[It’s a concern] not only for the person ordering train tickets, but for the person who might be standing next to that person who’s having a quite high-level conversation on the phone with a business colleague—or his mistress,” said Nicky Shaw, North American distribution manager with Storm Interface. Storm designs, develops, manufactures and markets heavy-duty keypads, keyboards, and custom computer interface devices, including those that provide accessibility for those with disabilities.

“Now that’s also been picked up and sent to the cloud,” she said. “Privacy needs to be given more consideration in my view because just deploying a microphone on a kiosk with no visible or audible means of letting people know it’s always on needs to be factored into the design.”

Accessibility Protocol

The protocols and practices for implementing voice in kiosks are not addressed in any U.S. Access Board standards and the KMA with Storm have incorporated a proposed voice framework for accessibility and more.  The Access Board has these standards to consider as a baseline for when they create actual standards. In that sense KMA is setting the table for them.

ada KIOSK CERTIFICATION
The KMA guidelines for voice are our suggested best practice for self-service.

The degree to which companies mine voice data for advertising information creates its own set of privacy concerns. Because most voice user interfaces require cloud processing services, any time the voice leaves the device makes the process more susceptible to a privacy breach. 

That can also create branding issues, with potential confusion as to who exactly the kiosk represents. Is it the foodservice operator, ticker or retailer, or is it a company such as Google or Amazon?

And at the end of the day, making it easy for the average person to use will go a long way toward determining how successful VR in interactive kiosks will be.

“Voice input is the collection method, while the platform collecting the command is the brain/processing power to take the correct actions,” said Tomer Mann, EVP for Milpitas, Calif.-based software company 22Miles.

“We are moving forward with integration but there is a long way to go,” Mann said.  “We have the input command solution but the processing machine learning technology needs to improve. It will happen with a few more iterations and innovation.”

Applications Impact

One of the obvious applications for VR in self-service kiosks is for accessibility, enabling their use by those with impaired vision or limited hand mobility.

VR can also be used to create the “wow” experience business operators are looking for. Imagine, for example, the opening of the latest blockbuster superhero movie.

“Let’s say a video wall at the theater senses that someone is approaching,” said Sanjeev Varshney, director, Global SAP with Secaucus, N.J. based Cyntralabs, a developer of integrated solutions that help retailers drive sales. 

“It could display a character from the movie, who says something such as ‘what movie would you like to see?’,” he said. “The character could then point to a card reader and say ‘just insert your credit card here” and have the tickets printed out or have an SMS sent to your phone.”

“One driver for voice relates to efficient and faster transactions” said Joe Gianelli, CEO & cofounder of Santa Cruz, Calif.-based Aaware Inc., a developer of technology that enables voice interfaces.

Consider tasks that may require an excessive amount of screen navigation or drilling down, Gianelli said. Voice is usually much more efficient if the user needs to navigate beyond three levels of touch.

Of course, VR won’t be a catch-all solution. Still, VR could be part of a menu of accessibility options.

“Speech command technology will never replace the need for other interface devices because people with speech impediments won’t be able to use it, just like there are people who are blind and can’t use a touchscreen,” Shaw said. 

 “A deployer would still need to provide tactile interface devices as well as the speech command,” she said. “This needs to be seen as another element in multimodal accessibility. There’s not a one-size-fits all solution.”

The technology is at its infancy, but with further innovations and feature updates, the solutions will only be more agile to day-to-day user experiences,” Mann said. 

“Technology is getting there,” he said. “22Miles just wants to stay ahead of that innovation as we do it all other digital or content triggering capabilities.”

And when it comes to industries, some of the key applications insiders are seeing are in the ticketing and restaurant ordering fields, with initial results showing promise. Catalogue lookup in a retail setting might also be a prime candidate.

“Imagine being able to find, filter and sort any item through voice,” Carpenter said. “It would eliminate the tedious tasks of searching through pages and pages of items to find your favorites. Just tell it what you want and then be on your way.”

More Information

WHITEPAPER – VOICE RECOGNITION & SPEECH COMMAND ASSISTIVE INTERFACE

 

MASTERCARD ZIVELO VOICE ORDERING WITH AI

 

KROGER LAUNCHES VOICE ASSISTANT ORDERING FOR GROCERY ECOMMERCE

 

ALEXA SELF-ORDER VOICE COMMAND VOICE RESPONSE QSR W/ CUSTOMER & EMPLOYEE. BEACON TECH

FMagazine Fall 2019 – Accessible Kiosks, Merchandising Displays and Best Design

 Accessible Kiosks – Fall 2019 FMagazine

FMA Mag The best of in-store merchandising, interactive kiosks and store fixtures for brands and retailers nationwide. The FMagazine Fall 2019 issue includes articles on:

  • How self-service kiosks will shape the future of grocery
  • Making kiosks accessible for everyone
  • Merchandising displays – getting the best design without blowing the budget

The FMagazine this issue includes a writeup by Peter Jarvis of Storm Interface on recent activities of the KMA and ADA.

Peter Jarvis article
Click for full size

Jaws Kiosk – Vispero Storm Collaborate on Accessible Kiosk Solution

Vispero And Storm Interface Collaborate To Provide Accessible Interactive Kiosk Solution

  • December 4, 2019

JAWS ADA Logo CLEARWATER, Fla.Dec. 4, 2019  — Vispero, the world’s leading assistive technology provider for the visually impaired, is excited to share news of a partnership between Vispero and Storm Interface, combining the JAWS® screen reader with Storm’s assistive technology products to create the most accessible kiosk experience for users who are blind, have low vision, or limited dexterity.

Storm Interface logo for assistive technology According to Matt Ater, Vice President of Business Development at Vispero, “Storm Interface’s dedication to a usable and accessible experience equals Vispero’s ongoing mission to serve users who are blind or who have low vision. The partnership between Storm and Vispero brings together two leaders in assistive technology and establishes greater usability of kiosks.”

The kiosk version of JAWS software has added support to make it easier than ever to integrate Storm Assistive Technology devices into a kiosk solution. Peter Jarvis, Storm Interface Vice President, shares, “Storm is delighted with the additional functionality provided by the screen reader in JAWS. This additional functionality will deliver a more complete and accessible experience for users of Storm ATP (Assistive Technology Products).”

JAWS Kiosk features that support Storm-ATP Devices include the ability to autostart JAWS upon insertion of headphones, the delivery of a custom welcome message, standardized keypad integration, the ability to customize additional button functionality, and an auto stop/session end function upon the removal of headphones.

Mark Riccobono, President of the National Federation of the Blind states, “Members of the National Federation of the Blind applaud the collaboration between Vispero and Storm Interface toward the continued development and implementation of accessible kiosk systems. As kiosks are an ever-growing gateway to banking, shopping, accessing healthcare, and applying for and receiving public services, it is essential that the blind have access to these systems in order to live the lives we want. We appreciate that both Vispero and Storm Interface have been, and will continue to be, receptive to the feedback and recommendations of the nation’s blind.”

This collaboration will help kiosk manufacturers meet accessibility requirements for federal government, banking, healthcare, hospitality, retail, transportation, and more.

About Storm
Storm Interface have designed and manufactured secure, rugged and reliable keypads, keyboards and interface devices for more than 30 years. Storm products are built to withstand rough use and abuse in unattended public-use and industrial applications. Storm Assistive Technology Products are recognized by the Royal National Institute for Blind People under their “RNIB Tried and Tested” program.

About JAWS Kiosk
JAWS Kiosk is a collaboration between The Paciello Group (TPG) and Freedom Scientific (sister companies under Vispero) which provides JAWS screen reading software for kiosks, technical implementation, and consulting services.

Contact Laura Boniello Miller at lmiller@vispero.com or your TPG sales representative for information.


JAWS Kiosk Vispero

Gold Sponsor – Vispero – ADA Accessibility Software Consultant

Kiosk Manufacturer Association (KMA) Announces Research Panel, MCR and NRF

Press release BusinessWire Dec 13, 2019

WESTMINSTER, Colo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–KMA’s ADA & Accessibility Research Panel serves as an ongoing feedback mechanism between KMA and the community. We invite companies interested in accessibility, associations dedicated to accessibility as well as users who are blind or partially sighted to join and share insights and opinions on accessible technology and more through focus groups, online questionnaires & telephone surveys. Join the KMA ADA research panel today and help shape the future of accessible media.

In tandem with the research panel, KMA invites you to take our ADA Accessibility Quiz and qualify for a free consultation review. Register for a free copy of our MCR (Mandatory Current Requirements) ADA Guidelines as recommended by the KMA at our recent meeting with the U.S. Access Board in Washington, DC. Take the quiz here.

NRF 2020 – Visit with us in NYC on January 12-14 at NRF 2020 at booth 1703. For a complete preview of KMA companies at NRF you can read our NRF 2020 Preview.

KMA News

If your company, organization, association, local, city, state or federal agency would like to participate at some level with the KMA, please contact craig@kma.global or call 720-324-1837

The KMA ADA Committee consists of Olea KiosksKioWareKioskGroupStorm InterfaceFrank Mayer and Associates, Inc.VisperoPeerless-AVMimoMonitorsKIOSK (KIS)Turnkey KiosksDynatouchAudioEye and Tech For All Consulting.

Thanks for the generous financial support of our GOLD sponsors Olea Kiosks | KioWare | Nanonation | Pyramid | Frank Mayer | Vispero | Zebra ZIVELO

Contacts

KMA
Craig Keefner
craig@kma.global
720-324-1837

Join Our Accessibility Research Panel

Join Our ADA Research Panel

KMA ADA Accessibility Certified KMA’s Accessibility Research Panel serves as an ongoing feedback mechanism between KMA and the community. We invite companies interested in accessibility, associations dedicated to accessibility as well as users who are blind or partially sighted are invited to join and share insights and opinions on accessible technology and more through focus groups, online questionnaires and telephone surveys. Join the KMA ADA research panel today and help shape the future of accessible media.

Your privacy is very important to us and we want you to feel comfortable engaging with us online. KMA’s Privacy Policy is posted here and we encourage you to review it and contact us at info@kma.global with any questions or concerns.

How to Join

To register for the KMA Research Panel please fill out the form below or call 1-720-324-1837.


Types of Research

​KMA is committed to learning more about the interests of the blind and partially sighted community across the world. Panel members will be asked, at different times during the year, to participate in information-gathering projects, which may include:

Focus Groups

​A focus group is a form of research in which a group of people share their perceptions, opinions, beliefs and attitudes towards a product, service, concept or advertisement. Questions are asked by a moderator in an interactive group setting.

Online Surveys

​Online surveys are usually used with a large group of people so the answers can be statistically reviewed and analyzed. This type of survey can range from being short with just a couple of questions or long with in-depth areas being explored with many questions.

Telephone Interviews

​A telephone interview is a process of data collection using a standardized questionnaire and calling panel members. It is a great alternative when online access isn’t the preference for respondents.

ADA and Accessibility Quiz and MCR Guidelines for ADA

Self Service ADA Accessibility Requirements and Quiz

Kiosk Industry and KMA are offering a free consultation for ADA and Accessibility for your self-service project.  Also to assist, a downloadable PDF with current ADA, Section 508 and ACA regulations that are currently mandated.

Excerpt below —

Are your kiosks ADA-compliant? Typically prospects and customers will include a stipulation that the units be ADA-compliant.  We see many requests for proposals from city, state and federal agencies where that one line is the only line about ADA.

Section 508 and the ACAA only apply to federal correct?  The long answer is No [see Accessibility FAQ on kma.global]. They apply to everybody.

Almost all kiosks are ADA-compliant, to a degree. Most all likely will observe basic reach requirements but that is only one of over 30 standing regulations concerning hardware. And there are another 30 or so which apply to the software and interface.

So, go ahead and test your knowledge. You can also schedule a free consultation.

Take me to the Kiosk and Accessibility Update

Gold Sponsor – Vispero – ADA Accessibility Software Consultant

Welcome to Vispero

Vispero is the world’s largest assistive technology provider for the visually impaired. Although officially formed in 2016, our brands Freedom Scientific, Enhanced Vision, Optelec, and The Paciello Group, share a long, rich history as industry leaders dating back to 1975.

We develop and deliver innovative solutions that enable blind and low vision individuals to reach their full potential – to gain an education, obtain employment, succeed in professional careers, and live independently throughout their lives.

Vispero ADA

Vispero is proud to operate in 90 countries worldwide, with products localized in over 24 languages.

As the prevalence of age-related eye diseases like macular degeneration steadily rise, assistive technology plays an increasingly vital role, resulting in a growing demand for low vision devices and services. Vispero is uniquely positioned to address these challenges head-on by providing the tools necessary to meet the needs of the low vision population through our far-reaching distribution network.

Our family of brands deliver a superior line of optical and video magnifiers; wearables; scanning and reading devices; and easy-to-use software. Vispero’s partnership with key organizations and advocacy groups keep us in the forefront of the low vision industry.

vispero companies graphic

For More Information

Click here for our Contact page or complete the information below.

 

Related ADA Kiosk Pages

ADA Kiosk

How Companies Can Prevent ADA Website Accessibility Lawsuits

ADA Compliance For Restaurants

Reprinted from Webstaurant Store

The Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, was an important piece of civil rights legislation that was signed in 1990. The law asserts that businesses must take every possible step to allow people with disabilities to enjoy the same products and services that are available to other customers. It also deals with the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission to make sure that employees are not discriminated against because of a disability. The following guidelines will help you as a restaurant or business owner to recognize the requirements of the ADA, and to comply with them so that your establishment can be a positive and accessible place for all customers and employees.

Customer Accessibility

senior woman sitting at a restaurant

The biggest hurdle that business owners face when dealing with ADA compliance is the removal of barriers. Barriers can take many forms, and not all of them are obvious to a person without a disability. It may seem impossible to rearrange and reconstruct your business for compliance, but the ADA was not established to cause financial ruin. The removal of barriers is only necessary when it is readily achievable for a business to do so. If the removal of a barrier will require excessive costs that the business cannot afford, the barrier may remain until it is readily achievable to remove it. Below is a list of the types of barriers that should be removed in existing structures and avoided in new ones being built. ADA.gov lists detailed, specific requirements for fixing all of the following problems.

Removing Architectural Barriers

Architectural barriers block disabled patrons from accessing your establishment in the same way that able bodied patrons can. The removal of these barriers is an important part of ADA compliance. By altering the following areas of your business, you can make the largest impact on physical accessibility.

Parking and Building Entrance

Patrons with disabilities must not only be provided with parking spaces that are close to your business, but they must also be given adequate space to exit their vehicles, and a clear, accessible path into your business from there. The entrance must be flush with the ground, or must have a ramp with a slight slope and safety rails so that customers in wheelchairs may enter. If there is no way to make your main entrance accessible and you have other entrances that could be (for example your back door that is for employees only), you must open those up to the public and clearly note where that entrance is located. If your business operates on the third floor of a building with no elevator, for example, you can make compliance readily achievable by making your services available for delivery to customers’ homes or cars.

Doors

handicap accessible doors

Even if disabled customers can approach your business easily, they may have a hard time getting in if your entrance is not ADA compliant. Entrances must be at least 36 inches wide to accommodate customers in wheelchairs, and handles cannot require squeezing or turning to accommodate customers with mobility disabilities like arthritis. Loop and lever style handles are compliant, knob and panel styles are not.

Facility Layout

Once customers enter your store or restaurant, they must be able to move around safely and efficiently. Aisles between shelves or tables must be at least 36 inches wide, and merchandise cannot be out of reach of customers in wheelchairs unless there are employees that are readily available to help. This rule also applies to self-service counters with condiments or flatware in fast food restaurants.

Restrooms

handicap restroom sign

It is important to meet ADA bathroom requirements by ensuring your restrooms are accessible to disabled customers, including blind and wheelchair-bound patrons. There must be enough space for a wheelchair to maneuver around the toilet and the sink, and safety bars are necessary to prevent falls. Installing braille restroom signs is an easy way to convey useful information to blind customers. There must also be enough space under the sink so a wheelchair user can reach the soap and faucet, and the handles of the soap dispenser and faucet must be easy to use for customers with mobility disabilities. Check out this planning guide for detailed instructions to help you design an ADA compliant restroom in your restaurant.

Sales Counters and Tables

Checkout counters must have a section that is no higher than 36 inches to be accessible to customers in wheelchairs, unless they are equipped with auxiliary counters. If this is not readily achievable, a simple fix such as offering the customer a clipboard can be made.

Restaurant tables must meet certain height requirements as well, and if the tables in your establishment are fixed, at least one table must have movable chairs.

Tax Benefits for ADA Compliance

Although compliance sometimes costs money, the IRS Code states that all businesses are eligible for tax deductions when installing ADA compliant equipment or removing barriers. The maximum deduction is $15,000 per year, and small businesses are also eligible for a tax credit that can cover up to 50% (up to $10,250 per year) of compliance related expenditures. Large businesses (large businesses have over 30 employees or revenues of $1 million or more in the previous year) are only eligible for the deduction.

ADA Compliance for Employees

The ADA was written to protect both business patrons and employees. As a business owner or hiring manager, it is extremely important to understand both aspects of the ADA. Here are some steps you can take to ensure ADA compliance with your employees.

Make Reasonable Accommodations When Possible

Under the ADA, it is illegal to refrain from hiring someone solely based on their disability. If you become aware that a potential hire is disabled, you must work with him or her to find a reasonable accommodation. Reasonable accommodations allow the employer to alter the way the job is performed so the disabled employee can do the job. This could potentially mean transferring the employee to a different position if that is possible.

cashier working at a grocery store

The employer does not have to make an accommodation if it proves to be an undue hardship, which means a significant financial expense, disruption, or change to the business. For example, if you run a grocery store and a potential cashier has a chronic back injury that prevents her from standing for long periods of time, you can accommodate her by allowing her to use a stool at the cash register, even if other cashiers are required to stand. It would be illegal to discriminate against this person if she is qualified for the job because this accommodation would not change the nature of your business or cause undue financial hardship.

You can also make reasonable accommodations by transferring an employee to a different department. If a potential cashier has a learning disability that prevents him from counting out correct change, you could consider hiring him to stock shelves instead. However, if a stocking job is not available, you do not have to give him the cashier position because he is not qualified for the job if he must handle cash.

Avoiding Discrimination During the Hiring Process

Some disabilities may be immediately visible when a potential employee comes in for an interview, but others do not present themselves right away. It is illegal to ask interviewees about any disabilities they may or may not have before presenting them with a conditional job offer. Contingent upon that offer, the employer may ask about potential disabilities to see if a reasonable accommodation must be made, but only if they ask the same questions of all employees with conditional job offers. They cannot revoke that job offer if the employee discloses that they do have a disability unless making accommodations would cause undue hardship to the business.

There are plenty of ways to accommodate both customers and employees with disabilities. It is important for the employer to be willing to work with disabled employees, both to avoid accusations of discrimination and to create an open work environment for everyone. Reading and learning about the ADA’s rules for reasonable accommodation is the best way to ensure that you’re providing a fair and equal opportunity for all employees. As it becomes possible, work to eliminate architectural barriers in your restaurant or business so that all patrons can experience what you have to offer.

Accessibility needs to be at the forefront of tech — here’s why

Excerpt reprinted from TheNextWeb

Andrew Burton

Story By Andrew Burton

Founder, The Circuit Board — Andrew is Head of Communications for 600+ staff music technology leader, Native Instruments in Berlin, a company with a vision to democratize digital music creation. After training as a journalist in London, he spent over a decade consulting for leading technology companies in Europe and Australia. In 2018 he founded The Circuit Board, a virtual communications consultancy. Andrew graduated from City University with a BA in Journalism and Psychology in 2008.

In March 2019 IKEA was praised for partnering with nonprofits to develop accessories that make its products more accessible for people with impairments. It’s a novel step forward but I can’t shake the feeling we need to reframe the conversation on accessibility in technology entirely. Accessibility should be a topic at the forefront of design. Here’s why:

Roughly one in five people in the US have registered with a disability, with a similar figure for the UK. But when creating new products or services, investing resources to make technology accessible for impaired users can seem like taking the scenic route to market. An expensive deviation from a lean go to market strategy.

accessibility considerations

It’s easy to toss accessibility considerations in the ‘nice to have’ bucket. ‘Accessibility as an afterthought’ is a frustration I’ve heard on repeat for the last decade. But to do this is to abandon a unique opportunity to unlock true innovation and realize a much bolder ambition.

The traits separating tasks that AI excels at, and those that remain distinctly human, are consistently cited as creativity, empathy, imagination, and vision. Indeed the Gospel of Jobs clearly states: “Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” So before we hand over the reins to AI, why don’t we focus on perfecting the human side of technology solutions.

If you’ve even dabbled in brainstorming techniques — or the hyper-trendy ‘design thinking’ — you’ll be familiar with the art of reframing a problem to see new solutions. What better way to do this than looking at new tech through the lens of our senses, with varying degrees of physical or sensory ability?

Thinking about impairments of sight, hearing, or touch from the outset forces designers, creators, and technologists to ‘look at’ problems from very different perspectives, and that brings opportunity for untold and exciting innovation.

Read full story at the TheNextWeb

Other Links

What accessibility looks like 30 years after the ADA passed

Posted on kma.global May 2019 from Denver Post

Excerpt from The Denver Post May 2019

It is also a reminder of why it’s important to keep the pressure on government and private entities to make public places accessible to all.

“The sort of run-of-the mill storefronts, restaurants, retail store, those really should be accessible now and a lot are but too many still are not,” said Kenneth Shiotani, senior staff attorney for the National Disability Right Network, which is based in Washington, D.C.

He said outdoor spaces, such as beaches and trails, pose more challenges than man-made structures when it comes to accessibility and for that reason, new guidelines were set for them in 2013. But Meridian Hill Park, which boasts of having the largest cascading fountain in the country, seems much more structured than other outdoor spaces, he said.

“I think the wedding party had reasonable expectations that 30 years later [after the ADA was passed] a federal park would be accessible,” Shiotani said. “It’s a public park, it’s paid for by public dollars, it should ultimately be accessible for everybody.”

How Companies Can Prevent ADA Website Accessibility Lawsuits

Reprinted from KMA Global

Every day, websites and mobile apps prevent people from using them. Ignoring accessibility is no longer a viable option.

How do you prevent your company from being a target for a website accessibility ADA lawsuit?

Guidelines for websites wanting to be accessible to people with disabilities have existed for nearly two decades thanks to the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative.

A close cousin to usability and user experience design, accessibility improves the overall ease of use for webpages and mobile applications by removing barriers and enabling more people to successfully complete tasks.

We know now that disabilities are only one area that accessibility addresses.

Most companies do not understand how people use their website or mobile app, or how they use their mobile or assistive tech devices to complete tasks.

Even riskier is not knowing about updates in accessibility guidelines and new accessibility laws around the world.

Investing in Website Accessibility Is a Wise Marketing Decision

Internet marketers found themselves taking accessibility seriously when their data indicated poor conversions. They discovered that basic accessibility practices implemented directly into content enhanced organic SEO.

Many marketing agencies include website usability and accessibility reviews as part of their online marketing strategy for clients because a working website performs better and generates more revenue.

Adding an accessibility review to marketing service offerings is a step towards avoiding an ADA lawsuit, which of course, is a financial setback that can destroy web traffic and brand loyalty.

Convincing website owners and companies of the business case for accessibility is difficult. One reason is the cost.  Will they see a return on their investment?

I would rather choose to design an accessible website over paying for defense lawyers and losing revenue during remediation work.

Another concern is the lack of skilled developers trained in accessibility. Do they hire someone or train their staff?

Regardless of whether an accessibility specialist is hired or in-house developers are trained in accessibility, the education never ends.

Specialists are always looking for solutions and researching options that meet guidelines. In other words, training never ends.

Many companies lack an understanding of what accessibility is and why it is important. They may not know how or where to find help.

Accessibility advocates are everywhere writing articles, presenting webinars, participating in podcasts, and writing newsletters packed with tips and advice.

ADA lawsuits make the news nearly every day in the U.S. because there are no enforceable regulations for website accessibility. This is not the case for government websites.

Federal websites must adhere to Section 508 by law. State and local websites in the U.S. are required to check with their own state to see what standards are required.

Most will simply follow Section 508 or WCAG2.1 AAA guidelines.

If your website targets customers from around the world, you may need to know the accessibility laws in other countries. The UK and Canada, for example, are starting to enforce accessibility.

In the U.S., there has been no change in the status of ADA website accessibility laws this year.

Some judges have ruled that the lack of regulation or legal standards for website accessibility does not mean that accessibility should be ignored.

Read complete article at Search Engine Journal May 2019

Ava’s faces lawsuit over ADA access

ADA Access Lawsuit AvaADA Access Lawsuit Ava

A linchpin of Castro Street, Ava’s Downtown Market & Deli has weathered fierce competition, rising costs and parking troubles. Now the grocery store’s latest threat has to do with the dimensions of its displays and chairs.

Source: www.mv-voice.com

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ADA Accessibility and Self-Service For All

Kiosk Industry Group Association Advisory Board | Listly List

Kiosk Advisory Board

Advisory Board members for the Kiosk Industry Group Trade Association are provided here. Kiosk Industry is a global, cause-based, not-for-profi

Source: list.ly

Here is the free list of kiosk and self-service resources the Kiosk Industry Group association maintains. 315 companies listed and you can list your own company.

News from the U.S. Access Board – March/ April 2019

access-board.gov  •  contact us

Access Board logo Access Currents 
News from the U.S. Access Board  •  March/ April 2019

 

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Access Board to Hold Town Hall Meeting and Training in Indianapolis on May 21

Indianpolis skylineThe Access Board will hold a town hall meeting in Indianapolis on the afternoon of May 21 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. The event will provide an open forum where members of the public can pose questions to the Board or share comments or concerns about accessibility for people with disabilities. There also will be panel discussions with area speakers on accessible recreation and outdoor environments, the Indiana AgrAbility Project, and local compliance initiatives under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The event will take place in the Pacers Square Room at Bankers Life Fieldhouse from 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm. Registration is not required. An assistive listening system, computer assisted real-time transcription (CART), and sign language interpreters will be available. Attendees are requested to refrain from using perfume, cologne, and other fragrances for the comfort of all participants. The meeting will not be streamed online, but there will be a call-in option and streaming CART.

Earlier in the day, the Board will also offer free training sessions on the ADA Accessibility Standards at the town hall site. There will be a program on how to apply the standards and common sources of confusion (9:00 am – 10:30 am). This will be followed by a session on recreation facilities and outdoor sites (10:45 am – 12:15 pm). Advance registration is not required, and participants can attend either or both sessions. Qualified attendees can earn continuing education credits (1.5 per session) from the American Institute of Architects.

For further information, contact Dave Yanchulis at yanchulis@access-board.gov, (202) 272–0026 (v), or (202) 272–0027 (TTY).

Bankers Life Fieldhouse logoU.S. Access Board Training and Town Hall Meeting, May 21
Pacers Square at Bankers Life Fieldhouse
125 S. Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, IN

Training Session on the ADA Accessibility Standards (free)
• 8:00 – 9:00 Registration & Welcome
• 9:00 – 10:30 Application of the Standards & Common Sources of Confusion
• 10:30 – 10:45 Break
• 10:45 – 12:15 Recreation Facilities & Outdoor Sites

Town Hall Meeting
• 2:00 – 2:15 Opening Remarks
• 2:15 – 3:30 Panel Discussions
• 3:30 – 4:30 Overview of the Access Board & Open Forum

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Karen Tamley Elected Access Board Chair

Board Chair Karen Tamley and Vice Chair Lance RobertsonAt its March meeting, the Board unanimously elected Board Member Karen Tamley as its new Chair. Tamley just completed a term as Vice Chair of the Board and has served as the Commissioner of the Chicago Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities since 2005.

“I am honored to serve as the Chair of such a dedicated agency that is a true force for change and that has done so much to advance accessibility both in the U.S. and abroad,” she stated after the vote. “I look forward to working with Board members and staff in the year ahead.”

Tamley joined the Board in 2015 as a public member. As head of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities, she leads numerous disability policy and compliance initiatives in transportation, city infrastructure, emergency preparedness, housing, schools and technology, and other areas. She also oversees the delivery of independent living services to city residents.

She succeeds Lance Robertson who represents the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) on the Board and who was named Vice Chair by acclamation. He serves as Assistant Secretary for Aging at HHS and heads its Administration for Community Living and previously was Director of Aging Services at the Oklahoma Department of Human Services.

Board officers serve for a term of one year. The Board is structured to function as a coordinating body among Federal agencies and to directly represent the public, particularly people with disabilities. Half of its members are representatives from most of the Federal departments. The other half is comprised of members of the public appointed by the President.

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Upcoming Board Webinars

laptop with Access Board seadEnsuring that public streets and sidewalks are accessible to people with disabilities can be a challenge, especially since accessibility guidelines for public rights-of-way have yet to be finalized. The next webinar in the Board’s free monthly series will take place June 6 from 2:30 – 4:00 (ET) and will be devoted to answering the various questions that come up in addressing access to sidewalks and street crossings, pedestrian signals, on-street parking, roundabouts, transit stops and other components of public rights-of-way as well as shared use paths. Board Accessibility Specialists will answer questions submitted in advance or during the live webinar and offer guidance, solutions, and best practices based on guidelines the Board proposed for public rights-of-way. Attendees are encouraged to submit their questions in advance.

Visit www.accessibilityonline.org for more information or to register for the webinar. Webinar attendees can earn continuing education credits. The webinar series is hosted by the ADA National Network in cooperation with the Board. Archived copies of previous Board webinars are available on the site.

Section 508 Best Practices Webinar
The Board also offers a free webinar series on its Section 508 Standards for ICT in the federal sector. The next webinar in this series will be held May 28 from 1:00 to 2:30 (ET) and will review the Trusted Tester for Web and highlight significant updates. Developed by Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Office of Accessible Systems and Technology in coordination with other agencies, the Trusted Tester Process provides a scalable, repeatable, accurate process for evaluating web and software products for conformance with the 508 Standards.

Representatives from the Board and DHS will review the latest edition (Version 5) which supports the revised Section 508 Standards and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (2.0). Trusted Tester 5.0 improves the format, flow, and construction of the evaluation process and test conditions. Presenters will discuss the new testing tool, the Accessible Name and Description Inspector (ANDI), and how it aids testers with code inspection-based testing. They will also cover the availability of DHS online training and certification. Questions can be submitted in advance of the session or can be posed during the webinar.

Visit the webinar site for further information or to register. The Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series is made available by the Accessibility Community of Practice of the CIO Council in partnership with the Board. Prior webinars can be accessed on the site.

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Poland Creates Entity Modeled after the U.S. Access Board

National Symbol of PolandThe Polish government has established an agency to promote accessibility that is modeled after the U.S. Access Board. Created in December, the Accessibility Council is responsible for reviewing laws and regulations and making recommendations to the government on implementing a sweeping new law to advance accessibility nationwide. The Council is comprised of 50 members representing ministries and government bodies, disability groups, and academia and meets quarterly. The Council will play a lead role in implementing the Accessibility Plus Program, an new measure that aims to make Poland a leader in accessibility by eliminating barriers in architecture, transportation, education, health care, digital and other services.

Poland’s Minister of Investment and Development Jerzy Kwieciński, who heads the Accessibility Council, credits the work of the U.S. Access Board and a speaking tour by Board Executive Director David Capozzi as the inspiration for the new entity. At the Council’s inaugural meeting in February, he recognized the Access Board’s influence and stated, “I believe that now Poland will become a model for other countries.” He supports a study tour of the U.S. for Council staff, including further consultations with the Board.

Capozzi travelled throughout Poland in 2017 as part of State Department’s speaker program to share the American experience in ensuring accessibility for people with various disabilities. During his weeklong stay in Warsaw, Gdynia, Gdańsk, and Kraków, he met with national and local authorities, advocacy groups, and other representatives, some of whom were instrumental in creating the Council. Capozzi discussed achievements and challenges of ensuring accessibility in the U.S. and shared lessons learned. He participated in dialogues on different aspects of accessibility, including the built environment, information and communication technology, employment, enforcement, and the important role standards play, among other topics.

“It was an honor to travel to Poland on behalf of the State Department and our embassy to meet with those leading the effort to make the country a model for accessibility,” states Capozzi. “The Board looks forward to learning more about their efforts and achievements and exploring how we can further advance accessibility in both our countries.”

In Warsaw, Board Executive Director David Capozzi (right) met with Senate Member Jan Filip Libicki and others.

David Capozzi with Senate Member Jan Filip Libicki

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Congressional Measures Address Airline Accessibility

airplaneLegislation was recently introduced in Congress to supplement the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) which prohibits discrimination in air transportation. Congressman Jim Langevin (D-RI) and Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) submitted bills in the House (H. R. 1549) and Senate (S. 669) to amend the ACAA to further improve access at airports and on aircraft. The bills would create accessibility standards for new airplanes, require removal of barriers on existing airplanes where readily achievable, strengthen enforcement mechanisms, including establishment of a private right of action and enhance safety.

Under these measures, the Access Board would be responsible for issuing standards for aircraft and equipment for boarding and deplaning, including seating accommodations, lavatories, stowage of assistive devices, announcements, and in-flight entertainment and video displays. The standards also would address airports, including ticketing counters, gates, customer service desks, audible announcements, kiosks, and websites. The bills were referred to the appropriate House and Senate committees for consideration.

In addition, under a law passed last year, the Department of Transportation (DOT) began reporting data on the number of passenger wheelchairs and scooters that are damaged or mishandled by airlines on a monthly basis. A total of 701 (2.18%) wheelchairs and scooters were damaged last December, an average of more than 25 a day, as reported in DOT’s monthly Air Travel Consumer Report (February issue). The total for January was 681 (2.06%) and for February was 593 (1.7%).

In a statement, Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-IL), who authored the law said, “Every airline passenger deserves to be treated with dignity and respect, but too often they aren’t. Travelers should be able to find out if certain airlines have high rates of breaking wheelchairs and other equipment that people depend on, just like we can find out if certain airlines have high rates of flight delays or cancellations.”

Further information on this reporting is posted on DOT’s website.

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Guidelines for Voting Systems Available for Public Comment

Election Assistance Commission sealFederal guidelines for voting systems implemented under the Help America Vote Act are currently available for public comment. Issued by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC), the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (VVSG) provide principles and criteria for assessing the basic functionality, accessibility, and security of voting equipment.

The EAC released the document, referred to as VVSG 2.0, on February 28 for a 90-day comment period, as indicated in a notice published in the Federal Register. The VVSG 2.0 updates guidelines first issued in 2005 and revised in 2015 and features a new streamlined structure comprised of high-level system design goals with broad descriptions of the functions that make up voting systems. The proposal also includes moving technical requirements and test assertions to separate documents that detail how voting systems can meet the new Principles and Guidelines in order to obtain certification. Those requirements and test assertions will be made available for public comment at a later date. The EAC seeks comments on all sections of the Principles and Guidelines including the proposed restructuring. Comments are due May 29.

For further information, visit the EAC’s website or contact Ryan Macias at (301) 563-3931 or votingsystemguidelines@eac.gov.

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Updated VPAT Now Available from the IT Industry Council

Information Technology Industry Council logoThe Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) maintains a free reporting tool known as the Voluntary Product Accessibility Template (VPAT) to help determine whether information and communication technology products and services satisfy accessibility requirements, including the Section 508 Standards. ITI recently released revised editions of the VPAT (2.3) based on the Board’s revised 508 Standards (VPAT 2.3 508), including the referenced Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0). It also offers VPATs for WCAG 2.1 (VPAT 2.3 WCAG), the European Union’s ICT requirements (VPAT 2.3 EU), and another based on all three (VPAT 2.3 INT).

Visit the ITI’s website for further information or send a message to info@itic.org.

ADA Accessibility and Self-Service For All

Touchscreen-based self-service technology is changing the way we do business, but one of the key challenges to widespread adoption is finding a way to make that technology useable by everyone.

Self-Service For All – ADA Kiosk

By Richard Slawsky contributor

ADA Kiosk Interactive touchscreens are quickly becoming a key player in the kiosk world. Businesses ranging from fast-casual restaurants to health care facilities and mall makeup stores are finding uses for touchscreen-based kiosks, offering services ranging from food ordering to patient check-in to complexion matching.

kiosk research
Combination of several reports (including Frost & Sullivan, Gartner, and IHL) + our own KI analysis. Hybrid POS checkouts and ATMs are not included unlike most reports..

The latest of the many reports forecasting the growth of the kiosk industry predicts the market will increase at a 9.7 percent compound annual growth rate, reaching $88.3 billion by 2022 from $46.1 billion in 2015. Drivers of that growth include increased customer’s interest towards self service, development in the retail and entertainment industries and innovations in touchscreen display and glass technology. The retail industry holds the lion’s share of the market, with about 40 percent of the overall revenue.

The growth of touchscreen-based self service hasn’t been without its challenges, though. Foremost among them has been the issue of making that technology available to all users, including those with disabilities. Another has been the expanded form factors such as tablets on the low end and large 85-inch touchscreens on the high side.  That’s a shift from the mostly 17-inch and 19-inch screens that dominate the ATM, airline and POS self-checkout precursor worlds.

The compliance conundrum

navbar kiosk
Example of navbar on outdoor ticketing kiosk. Click for full size image. Courtesy Olea Kiosks

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that about 19 percent of the country’s population, or about 57 million people, have some form of disability. Those include 8.1 million people who have difficulty seeing, including 2 million who were blind or unable to see. In addition, about 7.6 million people have impaired hearing. Roughly 30.6 million have problems walking or climbing stairs, or use a wheelchair, cane, crutches or walker, and 19.9 million people had challenges lifting and grasping. This includes difficulty lifting an object or grasping a pencil (or pressing buttons on a touchscreen interface).

To ensure those with disabilities can enjoy the same rights as everyone, in 1990 Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The law was designed to afford protections against discrimination similar to those of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the ADA prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in several areas, including employment, transportation, public accommodations, communications and access to state and local government programs and services.

For a business that incorporates kiosks into its operations, that generally means that a kiosk needs to be useable by all of its customers, no matter what their physical challenges may be. In many cases meeting that standard is easier said than done.

Click for full size

“ADA concerns are pretty much the same concerns that one would have for any type of a consumer self-service interactive solution,” said Ron Bowers, senior vice president of business development at Grafton, Wisconsin-based kiosk vendor Frank Mayer & Associates. “Some individual deployments are only adhering to the accessibility-by-wheelchair aspect.”. “Some individual deployments are only adhering to the accessibility-by-wheelchair aspect.”

Unfortunately, those basic accommodations can result in a business overlooking more than 35 million potential customers.

It’s worth noting that a large percentage of customers in wheelchairs also suffer from physical impairment.

Some of the biggest challenges kiosk deployers face is the degree of interpretation that must be applied to some of the regulations.  How many accessible units and what level of accessibility constitutes acceptable access?  Another is new regulations and retrofitting existing units can be problematic, said Craig Keefner, manager for Olea Kiosks.

“Complicating retrofits can be the issue of recertifying for UL,” Keefner said. “One change to the overall machine can require the new configuration to be recertified. If Walmart has to change all of its self-checkouts, that’s a big change.”

To help add clarity to exactly what kiosk deployers must do to be ADA compliant, in mid-September the Architectural and Transportation Barriers and Compliance Board released a final rule for electronic and information technologies used by federal agencies as well as guidelines for customer premises equipment and telecommunications equipment, including kiosks. The Access Board is an independent federal agency devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities.

A sample of the guidelines for kiosks outlined in the Access Board rule

  • In general, devices with a display screen shall be speech-output enabled for full and independent use by individuals with vision impairments.
  • Speech output shall be provided for all information displayed on-screen.
  • Where speech output is required, braille instructions for initiating the speech mode of operation shall be provided.
  • Devices that deliver sound, including required speech output, shall provide volume control and output amplification.
  • At least one mode of operation shall be operable with one hand and shall not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist. The force required to activate operable parts shall be 5 pounds (22.2 N) maximum.

The final rule is listed in the Federal Register. Covered organizations must meet compliance standards by Jan. 18, 2018.

Although much of the language in the final rule will likely keep lawyers busy for years to come, there are some guidelines that are easy to interpret. In general, the rules say that the technology with a display screen shall be speech-output enabled for full and independent use by individuals with vision impairments. Input controls shall be operable by touch and tactilely discernible without activation.

Running the risk

Missing out on revenue from millions of customers with disabilities is just one of the pitfalls of not complying with ADA regulations, or at least making every effort to make sense of the standards.

For violations that occurred after April 28, 2014, the maximum civil penalty for a first violation of ADA regulations is $75,000. For a subsequent violation, the maximum civil penalty is $150,000.

In addition, self-service kiosks are increasingly a target for ADA lawsuits. In March 2017, for example, the American Council of the Blind filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York against fast casual restaurant chain Eatsa on behalf of a blind customer. Under Eatsa’s business model, customers order from tablet-based kiosks and pick up their food from a cubicle when it’s ready.

Customer Michael Godino claims he was unable to use a self-order kiosk in an Eatsa to place an order because the kiosks weren’t accessible for blind customers.

“Because the self-service mobile applications, touchscreen tablets, and visually-marked cubbies Eatsa utilizes rely on exclusively visual displays and do not provide any form of audio output or tactile input, Eatsa’s design is entirely inaccessible to blind customers,” according to the lawsuit.

click for full size image

Restaurants aren’t the only businesses open to ADA lawsuits. A proposed class action suit against mall operator Simon Property Group claims a Proactiv skincare products kiosk, located in the Simon-run Miami Mall in Florida, discriminates against blind and visually impaired individuals. The lawsuit argues the Proactiv automated retail kiosk, which uses a touchscreen display, doesn’t offer a way for blind consumers to purchase its products.

“Sighted customers can independently browse, select, and pay for Proactiv brand skincare products at the Miami Mall Proactiv kiosk. However, blind customers are denied the opportunity to participate in this retail service,” the complaint reads. “Moreover, [the defendant] has failed to provide an alternative channel for blind customers to enjoy the retail service provided through the Proactiv kiosk, such as the training of qualified readers to assist visually impaired and blind customers.”

There are about 1,000 Proactiv kiosks in malls in the United States, Canada and Japan.

And just in case a business operator thinks having a staff member on hand to assist disabled customers with using self-service technology, chances are that’s not enough to keep from running afoul of the ADA.

More: consider for wall mount units the ADA requirement for  blind & partially sighted to be able to detect protuberances from walls with their canes. Click for full size

“It depends on the application and if the assistant is as available as the kiosk to provide services,” said Adam Aronson, CEO of San Rafael, Calif.-based Lilitab Tablet Kiosks. Lilitab designs, engineers and markets a range of tablet kiosk products. “If the cashier typically has longer lines than the kiosk, that’s not the same service level,” Aronson said.

While lawsuits against kiosk deployers related to ADA compliance are always a concern, other dangers include the negative publicity from being perceived as a business that is insensitive to the needs of disabled customers. Just a few months ago cable news was filled images of U.S. Capital Police forcibly removing disabled demonstrators from a protest over the Senate’s now-defunct health care bill. Nobody wants their business to be featured in similar reporting.

Of course, things are rarely simple when it comes to government regulations and the ADA is no different. Complicating the landscape is HR 620, the “ADA Education and Reform Act of 2017,” currently making its way through Congress. According to the Center for American Progress the bill, sponsored by Rep. Ted Poe (R-Texas), would require anyone seeking to file a lawsuit against a business for ADA violations to first provide written notice to that business, outlining the provisions of the law that apply to the violation. Business owners would then have 60 days to acknowledge the violation and another 120 days to at least make “substantial progress” towards rectifying it.

Opponents of the bill claim it would gut enforcement of the ADA by allowing businesses to stall the correction of violation for months or years, while those in favor say it would prevent the “drive-by lawsuits” that end up forcing business owners to pay settlements to lawyers who make a career out of filing ADA suits. The ADA bars the awarding of monetary damages in successful lawsuits, but does allow the awarding of “a reasonable attorney’s fee.”

Meeting the challenge

In an effort to sort through the confusion over ADA guidelines, kiosk deployers are taking their own steps to accommodate disabled users.

The easiest steps to take are those that offer access to individuals in wheelchairs or who are otherwise vertically challenged. That includes offering at least one kiosk with an adjustable height or a lower point of access.

VFO project by KioWare and URway. Click for full story.

“Swiveling mounts or adjustable height mounts may assist in accessibility – but they don’t solve the problem just by being available,” said Laura Miller, director of marketing with York, Pa.-based KioWare Kiosk Software.

“The physical placement of the kiosk is just as important as the presence of accessibility features and testing is needed even with the purchase of an accessible kiosk,” she said. “If the path to the kiosk is too narrow to approach head on, for instance, it becomes moot that the kiosk itself is accessible because getting to the kiosk is too challenging or the space too constricted. Vertical and horizontal reach must be considered.”

Ticketing unit for Universal with ADA. Photo courtesy Olea Kiosks. Click for full size.

As mentioned earlier, though, making the kiosk available to those in a wheelchair isn’t enough.

“No longer can you get away with a kiosk just being ‘reachable’,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Cerritos, Calif.-based Olea Kiosks. “Most companies will say their product is ADA compliant, but they fail to mention they’ve only covered a very small spectrum of individuals with disabilities. Sure, someone in a wheelchair can reach the screen, but serving people with disabilities goes far beyond that.”

As demonstrated by the Eatsa scenario, one of the biggest challenges in deploying interactive self-service technology is accommodating visually impaired users. A touchscreen relies heavily on users being able to see the screen, so deployers need to find ways to communicate that information in other ways.

“Without access to speech feedback for on screen contents and a method for determining what item the user is activating, a person who is blind or visually impaired cannot effectively make use of a touchscreen or tablet based kiosk,” said staff at the American Foundation for the Blind.

“For those with low vision, small or ornate fonts are difficult, if not impossible, to read,” AFB officials said. “Low contrast between the foreground and background can also make on-screen and print-labeled items difficult to read.”

In addition, glare on the screen and on any print-labeled areas of the machine can cause readability barriers for people with low vision, the AFB said.

“What I advise people to do is to recreate a version of the kiosk software that can be used by people with visual problems,” said Mike James, CEO of Washington D.C.-based Kiosk Group Inc.

“Information can be presented in large text and contrasting colors for people who are marginally blind, and to have a system for audio feedback for those who are completely blind,” James said. Those prompts can be used in conjunction with Braille keyboards to assist with navigation.

Storm Nav-Pad. Click for full size image

Accommodating users with hand mobility issues is a concern as well. An ‘Automated Passport Solution’ Olea built for deployment in the Dallas Fort Worth Airport incorporates the Nav-Pad, a keypad designed by London-based Storm Interface that provides accessibility to a kiosk’s functions for those with physical or sensory impairments. The APS kiosk shortens the clearance process for international travelers by collecting biographical and passport information from passengers before they are seen by a customs officer.

audio nav ada device
Audio navigation device. Click for full size. Courtesy Storm Interface

The Nav-Pad, developed in partnership with the Trace Research & Development Center, was originally designed for use in military and industrial applications where the user might be wearing heavy gloves. One of the pioneers in the space, Storm Interface also offers the Audio-Nav Keypad, an assistive USB device offering menu navigation by means of audio direction.

The work continues

As ADA compliance becomes a bigger and bigger issue for hardware manufacturers, software developers and kiosk deployers, a variety of industry groups are working to develop solutions that can meet the needs of disabled users.

The Kiosk Industry Association, for example, has formed an ADA working group  and committee expressly for ADA to try and standardize guidelines for the industry. A big initiative for the association is meeting with the US Access Board directly to help communicate industry information and context to the standards body directly.

Other organizations with ADA initiatives include the Electronic Transactions Association, which has also formed a working group. The ETA represents more than 500 companies worldwide involved in electronic transaction processing products and services, working to influence, monitor and shape the payments industry by providing leadership through education, advocacy and the exchange of information.

“The purpose of the group is to promote compliance and the development and deployment of products and services to help ensure access to the payment system,” said Meghan Cieslak, ETA’s director of communications. “The group is comprised of industry experts, start-ups, as well as ISOs and VARs – all focused on helping disabled Americans access the payment system.”

The Kiosk Industry Association is consulting with the ETA on access initiatives and has also enlisted the assistance of the ATM Industry Association which already has a formal ADA document via EFTA for their members.

It’s also critical for deployers to think about accessibility from the very beginning of a kiosk project. A paper co-authored by Peter Jarvis and Nicky Shaw, both from Storm Interface, along with Robin Spinks from the U.K.’s Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) included the following recommendations:

“Accessibility is most effectively achieved when adopted as a primary system specification,” the group wrote.

“It is most successfully implemented if considered during the concept design process,” they wrote. “Accessibility should be a primary objective during the origination of hardware solutions, application software and content to be delivered.”

In addition, consideration should also be given to the environment in which the system will be installed, they wrote, and that terminals located in public or unsupervised environments will need to survive regular cleaning and sanitization procedures using sprayed liquid disinfectants and other cleaning agents.

Along with providing hardware designed for accessibility, the application or website on the kiosk must be built with more than a cursory nod toward compliance in order to have these other components “work” in a successful and accessible deployment. The kiosk system software can utilize accessibility features and the hardware can provide sound, include keyboards and be height adjustable, but if the application isn’t built with accessibility in mind, or modified to make sure accessibility features are fully integrated, usability and accessibility will suffer for it.

These concerns, and others, are driving the various partnerships on ADA issues.

“It was pretty much a no-brainer for us to go ahead and work together on standardizing,” Keefner said.

“I’ve been really passionate about it and I’ve talked to kiosk manufacturers about binding together to create standards on kiosk design so people who walk up to a kiosk know where to find the audio jack, know where to find the braille keyboard or whatever,” said Kiosk Group’s Mike James. “Those features could be the same for every project.”

Unfortunately, despite the additional clarification on access rules it’s likely that in the short term it’s likely that many compliance issues are likely to be hashed out in court.

“It seems that there are a few people out there who have made it their job to litigate any non-ADA-compliant situations that arise,” Miller said. “This is not exclusive to kiosks, but they have not been completely spared, and while it seems relatively obscure at this point, those individuals looking for violations will likely eventually hit on the existence of kiosks as fodder for their litigious pursuits.”

Resources for kiosks and ADA compliance

ADA Committee and ADA Working Group for Kiosk Association

ADA White Paper on Kiosk Industry

Access Board final rule for information and communication technology

Trace Research and Development

National Council on Disability Report

Interactive Accessibility   – accessibility consulting firm

Digital Business kiosk consultants

COMMENTS

Richard and Craig

I wanted to congratulate you both on an excellent and  informative article. Thank you for helping to bring the importance of ADA and ACAA mandates to the attention of the Kiosk Industry and to those agencies deploying and operating ICT in public environments. Thanks also for recognizing Storm Interface in the text of the article and for including some of those images showing deployed installations. We are constantly working to improve and add to the range of accessibility and assistive technology products available to kiosk designers. There are some exciting new developments in process which will help to deliver the “multi-modal” methods of system interface that are widely predicted to be the next big step in system accessibility. The priority will be to ensure our partners in the kiosk industry are kept aware of and fully supported in the deployment of Assistive Technology Products (ATP).

Hopefully your article will receive the recognition it deserves and I will have an opportunity to work with you both to maintain awareness of accessibility issues within the kiosk industry.

Best Regards

Peter Jarvis
Senior Executive VP