Category Archives: Touchscreen Technology

KMA Welcomes Goldfinger Monitors – Touch Screen Monitors

Welcome – Goldfinger Touchscreen Monitors

KMA is pleased to welcome Goldfinger, provider of touch screen monitors and touch screen components. Goldfinger offers many customizable touch screen monitors in an array of sizes.

Goldfinger is the fastest growing monitor company in the United States designing and manufacturing non-touch and touch screen monitors with touch-screen capable on-screen menus boasting state-of-the-art technology and durability. We offer a full line of monitors that are built tougher with bolder colors and brighter screens. We design for markets such as point-of-sale applications including retail, casino gaming, vending, and arcade along with self-service commercial locations. At Goldfinger, we are geared to respond quickly to changes in the marketplace and the needs of you and your customers. We love challenges and welcome your feedback. We firmly believe we are only as successful as our customers.
animated goldfinger monitorLEARN MORE

Imagine a touch screen experience unlike any other. Experience vibrant lighting, high-definition imagery and brighter & bolder colors for the best Interactive experience. Infrared technology allows you to interact using a finger, a gloved hand, a pencil, or any other solid object. PCAP technology allows for a sleek look while still offering durability. Our tempered glass screen is virtually indestructible with no loss of clarity. Brighter and bolder video software with 900-2000 Nit panels available. Goldfinger monitors can run over 70,000 hours in a lifetime and with a return rate of less than 0.1% it’s no wonder why 300+ companies trust Goldfinger to deliver them over 1 million monitors.

Goldfinger offers a range of touchscreen monitors from 8″ to 86″, as well as custom monitors. Monitors offered in NonTouch, Infrared, and PCAP technologies.

To contact – visit our website Goldfinger or you can call at 843-996-0095 and/or email us here.

You can request more information here if you like

 

Touchless

Touchless Kiosk – Gesture, IR, Voice, AI, Foot & Mobile

Having touchscreens or customer input stations which utilize no-touch touchscreen technology accelerated with the advent of COVID-19 pandemic.  How clean are the touchscreens is the usual question and what is involved in cleaning and maintaining touchscreen.

The added cost of a touch layer is a factor as well. Roughly a 22″ inch screen requires $220 in touch technology in order to make it a touchscreen.

Some of the options have been to reduce the area needed for touch control emulating a remote control onscreen for your screen. In large format displays this can save money.

Touchless Solutions – Companies

Olea Touchless Touchscreen Interaction

Here is an example of touchless touchscreen circa 2020 and Olea Kiosks.

From Frank Olea off LinkedIn — CONTACTLESS Touchscreen! We got them! I was super excited when we got these in our lab a few weeks ago. The system is very intuitive and does not require drivers. It’s plug and play in Windows and Android. The lighting turns on when your finger breaks the beams surface to give you an indication that the touch is active. There’s also an audio tone when you “press” a button. It works anywhere from .5” – 1” away from the glass surface. We have various sizes and can do portrait or landscape and add other features like privacy filter. Private message me or ask your Olea rep about it.

olea-contactless_progressive_video from Craig Keefner on Vimeo.

22MILES TOUCHLESS TOUCH…. JUST SPEAK AND GO

Create a fully interactive touch-free user experience through 22MILES’ Voice Activation/Recognition & Control. A component of the Digital Signage Solution Publisher Pro.AIoT, no matter the kiosk, location, or signage application, COVID-Proof the experience for users with a technology that is becoming the new standard.

  • Users Experience FASTER more EFFICIENT Interactions and Transactions
  • Find, filter and discover information, navigation, & more through voice
  • Eliminate the tedious tasks of searching through pages and pages of items & information…. JUST SPEAK AND GO
  • More information

KioWare Mobile Controller

This is a software feature solution offered by KioWare. Windows or Android. KioWare also offers Maintenance Notification for Users so they can see “Last Cleaned” cycle.

KioWare innovations for clean touchscreens and the User Monitored Maintenance Cycle

Ed Note: Using the kiosk as the “fulcrum” or proxy is not a new idea but it is coming of age with the current situation.  These new functions allow users to use their mobile phones as the proxy touchscreen. Statistically their mobile phone is a hotbed for bacteria but this method isolates users from contaminating the usually very clean touchscreen. People without mobile phones have cleaner fingers.  Kind of an odd situation of juxtaposable factors.

More information

Kiosk Innovations Camera and Gesture

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Gesture-Nav is an easy to use sensor based hand gesture navigation tool. It reliably senses 5 dierent directional gestures including Up, Down, Right, Left, and Enter

The Intel RealSense Camera and several software solutions around this exist. Typically requires or uses RealSense.  More information

Kiosk Innovations – Foot Controlled Navigation

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Foot-Nav is an easy to use, easy to understand, and very reliable navigation tool. Foot-Nav allows users to use foot controls rather than touch to navigate through a user interface using the same controls as Gesture-Nav.

KIOSK Information Systems AI or Artificial Intelligence

Meanwhile KIOSK (KIS) has teamed up Valyant on conversational AI

Conversational AI Kiosk – Valyant AI & KIOSK Information Systems Enable Contactless Conversational AI

Pyramid Labs – Touchless Demo

Josef Schneider
Chief Executive Officer at Pyramid Computer GmbH

What can you play with on a Monday morning in Pyramid Computer GmbH´s lab? Contactless interaction with Ultraleap for sure is fun. Will the world ever see it in massive kiosk rollout? Who knows, but we would be ready.
BTW great to be back in the lab. I missed playing on these gadgets a lot in the home office.

Pyramid Touchless Demo from Kiosk Manufacturer Association on Vimeo.


Touchless Solutions – Technologies

Configuring IR from Zytronic

Our pcap controllers/sensors can be set up by any user, with sufficiently high levels of sensitivity that they will detect the approach of a finger a few mm from the surface of the glass.

The issue that all non-touch touchscreens are likely to face is the susceptibility to ‘false touches’ as unless the user’s finger is pretty perpendicular to the screen, there is a risk that a knuckle/palm may activate other areas of the touchscreen (or in the case of an IR/optical touchscreen, also inanimate objects such as a shirt sleeve). The palm rejection algorithms within our controllers’ firmware will help, but I suspect that by cranking up the touch sensitivity to such levels they’d be fighting a losing battle.

The software content/GUI will also need to be carefully designed, with larger than normal keys and wide ‘guard bands’ around the keys, again, to minimise accidentally activating surrounding keys.

NFC Touchscreens

NFC means near field communications and is a short range form of wireless technology that lets you exchange data with other NFC enabled devices.  This typically involves an NFC chip and card.   NFC works within a radius of 10 centimetres making it an ideal method for sending data securely.

An example of use could be a teacher using an NFC card to login to a touchscreen with an NFC reader which would then automatically log them in to their own files and folders on the local network.

Another example is a customer using an NFC enabled mobile phone, tapping an NFC reader on a touchscreen kiosk to checkout and pay for their order.

In both examples, NFC is a great way to provide speed and convenience in busy environments and negating the need to input sensitive data on-screen. Example Link

Optical Sensor Touchless

Here is June 2019 release

SANTA CLARA, CaliforniaJune 26, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Neonode Inc., (NASDAQ: NEON), the optical sensing technology company, today announced that its zForce® Touch Solutions are now optimized for reducing pathogen transmission in hospitals and other public spaces, by enabling contact-free interaction with graphical user interface (GUIs).

Transmission of health care-associated pathogens that have been shed onto touchscreens and button panels such as elevator buttons, vending machines, information boards, and electronic menus in fast food restaurants create well-documented public health risks. Evidence supporting these risks is provided by the NIH [1]. Neonode zForce Touch Solutions enable contactless interaction with touchscreens and button panels to mitigate these risks.

A zForce Touch sensor mounted along one edge of a display provides an interaction area positioned a desired distance above the display surface as illustrated in Figure 1, below. By making the interaction area hover above the display surface, users experience touch interaction without actually coming in contact with the display, reducing the risks of shedding and receiving health care-associated pathogens through contact with the display.

A zForce Touch sensor can also be mounted beneath a panel of buttons, such as an elevator panel, to enable riders to select their floor without touching the buttons.

“The risk of contamination in hospitals and public areas is of paramount concern to facilities, customers and designers of displays and other interactive devices. Providing a safety-conscious solution without compromising performance and the user experience is the driving force behind Contactless Touch, and we believe our customers will be as excited as we are about this innovative application,” states Carl Bergendal, Executive VP Sales and Engineering at Neonode.

For more information please see “Contactless Touch- a safer method of interaction” [2] at neonode.com.

Hospitality Technology

Elevators go touchless here

Voice Control

Controlling an interface via Voice is getting better. Multiple software companies provide this now. Noisy places can require more expensive noise cancellation array microphones

Proxy Mobile

This is a software feature solution offered by KioWare. Windows or Android. KioWare also offers Maintenance Notification for Users so they can see “Last Cleaned” cycle.

Camera and Gesture

Gesture-Nav

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Gesture-Nav is an easy to use sensor based hand gesture navigation tool. It reliably senses 5 dierent directional gestures including Up, Down, Right, Left, and Enter

The Intel RealSense Camera and several software solutions around this exist. Typically requires or uses RealSense.  More information

Pyramid Labs – Touchless Gesture Demo

Josef Schneider
Chief Executive Officer at Pyramid Computer GmbH

What can you play with on a Monday morning in Pyramid Computer GmbH´s lab? Contactless interaction with Ultraleap for sure is fun. Will the world ever see it in massive kiosk rollout? Who knows, but we would be ready.
BTW great to be back in the lab. I missed playing on these gadgets a lot in the home office.

Pyramid Touchless Demo from Kiosk Manufacturer Association on Vimeo.

Foot Controlled Navigation

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Foot-Nav is an easy to use, easy to understand, and very reliable navigation tool. Foot-Nav allows users to use foot controls rather than touch to navigate through a user interface using the same controls as Gesture-Nav.

AI or Artificial Intelligence

Meanwhile KIOSK (KIS) has teamed up Valyant on conversational AI

Conversational AI Kiosk – Valyant AI & KIOSK Information Systems Enable Contactless Conversational AI

Camera Intel RealSense

The Intel RealSense camera is getting many more integrations and include Gesture and Facial Recognition.

There are three different versions of the camera all tailored to specific situations:

  1.  Coded Light for depth and objects [SR300]
  2. Stereo used for facial recognition primarily [400 family]
  3. Lidar version  [515]

The F400 and D400 are most commonly used in the public space. Some interesting examples are:

  1. Teleidoscope Skeletal tracking
  2. Gestoos gesture
  3. Eyeware

All of these and more are listed on Intel RealSense website

There are more videos of RealSense and Skeletal Tracking on YouTube

Background on Contactless

Article by Richard Berglind, Sr. with Neonode

Smartphones and other portable products have made touch the human machine interface (HMI) of choice for many other products. Touch sensing is easy to implement, easy to use, reliable and cost-effective. However, there are many applications and situations where physically touching a device is not desired and, in fact, in some cases must be avoided. Before discussing a solution to these more restrictive applications, a little touch sensing background is in order.

A touchy topic

According to a recent market report, there is a growing need for touch sensing [1]. The report projects the global touch sensors market will reach approximately USD 8.4 billion by 2023, growing at 12.8% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) over the forecast period 2018–2023. Typical touch sensing technologies include: resistive, capacitive, surface acoustic wave (SAW), infrared (IR), optical imaging and more recently acoustic pulse recognition (APR). In their most common implementation, these approaches all require actual contact with the surface. However, applications exist that do not want or must avoid physical contact and necessitate a more sophisticated sensing approach.

One possibility would be using a time-of-flight technology to identify mid-air interactions above a touchscreen [2]. Time-of-flight is a ranging technique that resolves the distance between the sensor and an object by measuring the time it takes for light to travel to an object and back to the sensor. The accuracy is on the order of 1 cm, which makes it unsuitable for touch interaction purposes. Improving the accuracy would generally mean a slower frame rate. Furthermore, this kind of sensor requires calibration and is sensitive to changes in temperature.

Another alternative is infrared technology. Traditional infrared touch requires a frame surrounding the screen with emitters on two adjacent sides and receivers on the opposing sides. The touch interactive area is raised from the screen by simply raising the frame around the screen. However, the resulting rim around the screen would not only be difficult to incorporate aesthetically in a device, it would also make the screen difficult to clean, thereby defeating one of the purposes for its usage.

Read full Article by Richard Berglind, Sr. with Neonode

Some more information

From Intuiface: “Touchscreen Guidance in a (Post) Confinement World”, located here: https://www.intuiface.com/blog/touchscreen-guidance-for-a-post-confinement-world

Includes a reference to the how-to guide about an Intuiface-based experience illustrating how to incorporate touch alternatives in an interactive kiosk.

Elevators

Contactless Elevators & Kiosks, covers the Neonode Sensor Module and how our patented Optical Reflexive Technology provides a quick and inexpensive solution to turning traditional controls and displays into contactless, interactive devices. Ideal for new devices and to retrofit old ones, it is a practical solution to combating the spread of pathogens and other contaminants. Neonode evaluation modules and products are available today from Neonode and their distributor, DigiKey.
 
Holographic Elevators & Kiosks demonstrates how the Neonode Sensor Module and the ASKA3D Plate, combined with a display,  and some creative engineering can turn any elevator control panel or kiosk display into an interactive holograph. It is a real upscale approach to combating the spread of pathogens and contaminants. We are currently working around-the -clock on prototypes and working models with our manufacturing partner in Arizona will be available for your evaluation in the next 30 days from Convergence Sales.

Switching to Holographic and Other Contactless Touch
Solutions for Safer, Germ-free Interaction
We encourage you and your customers to join us Wednesday, June 24  at 0900 PST or this ground-breaking webinar on designing and manufacturing safe, interactive displays, presented by Neonode, the industry leader in Optical Reflective Technology.

Registration opens May 15 at: Neonode.com

Interested in More information?

Hand Sensor Patent by Google for Touchless Touch Moves Ahead

Source article on Reuters

Be sure and visit our summary page on Touchless

Touchless Touch

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google unit won approval from U.S. regulators to deploy a radar-based motion sensing device known as Project Soli.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said in an order late on Monday that it would grant Google a waiver to operate the Soli sensors at higher power levels than currently allowed. The FCC said the sensors can also be operated aboard aircraft.

The FCC said the decision “will serve the public interest by providing for innovative device control features using touchless hand gesture technology.”

A Google spokeswoman did not immediately comment on Tuesday, citing the New Year’s Day holiday.

The FCC said the Soli sensor captures motion in a three-dimensional space using a radar beam to enable touchless control of functions or features that can benefit users with mobility or speech impairments.

Google says the sensor can allow users to press an invisible button between the thumb and index fingers or a virtual dial that turns by rubbing a thumb against the index finger.

Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) team has been working on Project Soli since 2015. The gesture-based system uses broad beam radar to detect and capture hand movements, turning them into commands for mobile devices. Until now, though, the tech has been restricted, with some companies — including Facebook — claiming that the high frequency levels required might interfere with existing technology. Now, the FCC has granted a waiver that will allow Soli to operate at higher levels than currently allowed, and therefore continue development as Google originally intended.

New Member – General Touch Touchscreens

General Touch has been a leading touch solutions provider in the global marketplace for more than 20 years. By putting the customer’s interest first, GT consistently offers exceptional customer experience and satisfaction through its wide variety of touch technologies and solutions including All-in-One touch systems.

WHO WE ARE

As a forerunner in the China’s touch industry, General Touch quickly became a global player in delivering high-quality, cost-effective and versatile touchscreens for customers from 80+
countries with over 4 million installations. GT produces  touchscreens and touch displays that meet international standards such as CCC, FCC, CE, UL, and ROHS.

WHAT WE DO

General Touch makes available advanced touch technology at a sensible price for its clientele. GT further adds unbeatable
value through customization to meet particular needs when required. The versatility of GT’s touch products is evident from their presence in varying industries such as Gaming, Kiosks, POS, Banking, HMI, Healthcare and Public Transportation. GT heavily invests in R&D so as to produce touchscreens with broad range of sizes (7” to 86”), for wide range of applications and for long periods of utilization. With a focus on delighting both
customers and users, GT’s Pcap/ PIT/ SAW/ IR touchscreens have garnered loyal and prolonged support from international brands. General Touch even offers up its touch products for ‘adoption’, empowering customers who have proudly branded GT’s touch products as their own (OEM), thus, increasing their corporate stature and extending their market reach.

WHY WE ARE LOVED

By betting our success on our customers’ success, we do whatever it takes to fulfil their product requirements. Should there be any shortcoming, our customers know that we will do right by them. At the end of the day, our customers are delighted by our passion to help them thrive in their business arena with our competitive, reliable and appealing touch products backed with our dedicated aftersales service. Best of all, our customers get to enjoy the
benefits of our continual growth and improvement in our business practice and technical competence.

For more information and a free quote fill out the form

 

Products

Contact Us

The Europe/Russia/CIS:

Ms. Emily Gu
Telephone: +86-28-8512-4124
Cell: +86-136 8809 7132
Mailbox: guxiangyun@generaltouch.com

Mr. Kevin
Telephone: +86-28-8512-4125
Cell: +86-158 2858 4823
Mailbox: yaoyuchuan@generaltouch.com


The Americas

Mr. Andrew Cheang
Telephone: +86-28-8512-4123
Cell: +86-134 3896 4343
Mailbox: andrew-cheang@generaltouch.com


The India, Middle East & South-East Asia

Mr. Music Cai
Telephone: +86-28-8512-4113
Cell: +86-159 2895 3508
Mailbox: caiyingjie@generaltouch.com


The South Korea/Japan

Mr. Lee
Telephone: +86-28-8512-4123
Mailbox: lijidong@generaltouch.com

Large Format IR & PCap Touchscreen Cleaning Recommendations

IR and PCap Touch Screen Cleaning Recommendations

TSITouch is a major provider of touchscreen overlays for large format touchscreens. 55″ is arguably the most popular but larger and smaller are both major markets.

We checked with TSI to see what they say.

Most screens, independent of if they have touch, protective, or raw OEM panels are not sealed against water intrusion.   We did have a customer whose cleaning staff was using a mop, same one as they used to clean the floor, and they were killing the screens on a routine basis.  Any cleaning solution should first be applied to a lint free cloth which is then used to clean the screen. No electronics should be sprayed and them wiped.

Soapy water leaves a thin residue on most surfaces so it is not recommended for cleaning screens.   The best cleaner  for displays with and without touch or protective solutions is any cleaner that does not have a high concentration of alcohol in it.     Continued application of high alcohol concentrate cleaners will cause exposed plastics to discolor and become brittle over time.

TSItouch offers a screen cleaner that is < 98% deionized water <2 % BIO T Max and < .1% AEM 5772-5.  AEM 5772-5 is an anti-microbial  and BIO T Max is a biodegradable solvent  typically used to removed oil and grease as well as other oil based products.  Any product with a similar composition will work well.

Cleaning PDF Downloads

Contact TSITouch For More Information

Mimo Monitors Feb Newsletter

Mimo Monitors Newsletter Feb 2020

Editor Notes: Mimo Monitors specializes in small touch screen monitors and displays that simplify your life and maximize your potential at work. Ranging from 7-21 inches, we pride ourselves on innovative, high quality, and cutting-edge touchscreen technology designed to be inherently flexible to suit your needs, and bring your vision to life.  Visit Mimo Website for more information.

Mimo Monitors: February 2020
2020 is off to a wonderful start. With ISE behind us and DSE just around the corner, we can’t wait to show you what we’ve got in store.
Catch Up With Mimo Monitors
Make An Appointment to Stop by Our Booth (#3022) At the Digital Signage Expo (DSE) 

This year at DSE check out the launch of our brand new, first-ever outdoor digital signage. You can also check out our new shelf edge displays, and feel the revolutionary Mimo Vue with TanvasTouch®. We’ll have all this and so much more at the booth, so make an appointment to check it out.

Schedule an DSE Booth Appointment Here
Learn About the Culture at Mimo Monitors

We’ve worked to cultivate a culture at Mimo Monitors that allows for individual growth and strong teamwork. We encourage our employees to think outside the box to best serve our customers, while also focusing on collaboration in and outside the office. Check out this video to learn more about our culture at Mimo Monitors and some of our great team members.

Watch the Video About Our Company Culture
Watch our rAVe booth tours from ISE

Our friends at rAVe stopped by our booth at ISE to chat and check out some of our latest products. Watch Partner Channel Manager, Tyler Wells, from our team walk through some of the products we featured at the show.

Watch rAVe booth videos from ISE
Hear Our CEO, David Anderson, Speak at DSE on “Game Changing Innovations in Small Digital Signage”

On Wednesday, April 1st in the Best Practices Theatre at 12:15 PM come hear our President & CEO David Anderson Speak about recent game-changing innovations in small format digital signage. We’ll cover relevant and engaging topics such as AV-over-IP solutions, surface haptics, and conference room-in-a-box solutions and provide tangible insights you can use to help you reach your goals.

Check Us Out at ISE
Introducing Our Shelf Edge Displays, The Ideal Retail Digital Signage Solution

We know shelf edge displays can be an incredibly valuable in-store marketing tool. We’re pleased to launch our 23×2″ shelf edge displays, available with and without Android Media Player. Sleek, flexible, and durable, these displays are fuss-free and seamless to install. Check out this video to learn all about them.

Watch The Video About Our New Shelf Edge Displays
Learn About Our Charitable Giving Program with TechSoup, A Global Non-Profit That Supports Non-Profit Organizations With Mission-Critical Resources

We’re proud to collaborate with TechSoup to provide our products to some of the organizations who need it most. We’ve helped out organizations such as The Boys & Girls Club of Milwaukee, The New York Academy of Sciences, DC Scores, Paws for Life and hundreds more.

Learn More About Our Work With TechSoup
Read Mimo Monitors’ Case Studies & White Papers

If you’re interested in learning about how we’ve benefitted some of our customers, you can check out the new white paper and case studies section of our website for an in-depth look.

Read Case Studies & White Paper
Are You Media/Press Interested In Covering Mimo Monitors?

We’ve got a brand new press kit on our website. If you’re a member of the media we invite you to check it out, and contact us if you’re interested in collaborating on a story, or stop by our booth at upcoming trade shows. We’d love to work with you.

Check Out Our Press Kit
Are You Following Mimo Monitors on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook?

We’re posting ongoing and valuable content over on our social media pages regularly. We’re sharing some of our favorite tips, tricks, and information pertaining to company and industry news. You can find and follow us here:

Twitter: @MimoDisplay
Facebook: Mimo Monitors
LinkedIn: Mimo Monitors

Follow Us On Twitter
Copyright © 2020 Mimo Monitors, All rights reserved.

TDS touch introduces IP65 industrial touch display

ip65 touchscreen IP65 Touchscreen Announced

As digital signage and kiosks of self-service devices gradually move from indoor lobbies to semi-outdoor and outdoor locations, TDSTOUCH has introduced the 37 series industrial touch displays to meet the needs of a stable 7 day X 24 hour operation in a complex external environment. 37 series industrial displays have the following features:

  • 3MM thick aluminum alloy front panel, anti-collision
  • front frame conforms to IP65 level protection standard
  • 10 point projection capacitive touch screen
  • touch cover explosion-proof treatment, hardness up to 7H
  • anti-interference industrial grade driver board
  • brightness can be customized
  • automatic adjustment according to ambient light
  • both rear mounting hole and VESA hole can be installed
  • support operating temperature range -10 degrees to 55 degrees

IP65 touchscreen

TDS37 series can provide 10.1 inch / 21.5/15.6/17/18.5/19/10.4/15 inch a variety of sizes, according to the customer can choose different application configuration. For more product information, please visit our website or contact our office. 

Contact Info:

Website:WWW.USTDSTOUCH.COM

Tel:408 850 7128  Emailtdstouch@gmail.com

Address5201 Great America Parkway, Suite 320

Santa Clara CA 95054.

 

Touchscreen FAQ – Are All Kiosk Touchscreens Created Equal?

Interactive Touchscreen Comparison

olea kiosk Interactive touchscreens come in several varieties. Here’s a quick overview of the types and the applications to which each is best suited.  Whitepaper by Olea Kiosks

Although interactive touchscreens have been around in one form or another since the late 1970s, over the past 10 years or so they’ve become an integral part of our lives.

In fact, thanks to the iPhone, tablet computers and similar devices, we’ve become accustomed to the idea that we should be able to touch the screens we see and get a reaction. Interactive touchscreens are a central feature of devices ranging from ATMs to wayfinding kiosks to the photo kiosks common in drugstores around the country.

A Research and Markets study valued the size of the interactive display market at $9.9 billion in 2015, with that market estimated to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 15.5 percent over the next five years, reaching $26.9 billion by 2022.

Interactive displays include a variety of technologies, though, and not every technology is suited to every application.

Touchscreen Type

Stacking them up

According to the industry trade publication Control Design, there are five main types of touchscreens: resistive touch, infrared touch, surface capacitive, surface acoustical wave and projected capacitive. Each has its advantages, disadvantages and applications for which it is best suited.

Resistive Touchscreen

A resistive touchscreen is made up of several thin layers, including two electrically resistive layers facing each other with a thin gap between. When the top layer is touched, the two layers connect and the screen detects the position of that touch.

“Resistive touch is a very old technology that some companies still offer as their go-to,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“It works great in places with dust and grease, such as fast food restaurants, and its low price point can make it attractive for those with a limited budget,” Olea said. “I personally don’t care for it because it makes the image on the screen appear hazy and it wears out over time.”

In addition, resistive-touch screens are unable to perform the multitouch functions that are becoming increasingly popular.

touchscreen technology OleaInfrared Touch

For very large displays, infrared touch is the most common application. Instead of a sandwich of screens, infrared touchscreens use IR emitters and receivers to create an invisible grid of beams across the display surface. When an object such as a finger interrupts the grid, sensors on the display are able to locate the exact point.

Advantages of infrared touch are excellent image quality and a long life, and they work great for gesture-based applications. In addition, scratches on the screen itself won’t affect functionality. In many cases, touch capability can be added to a display through the use of a third-party overlay placed on the existing screen.

On the downside, infrared touchscreens are susceptible to accidental activation and malfunctions due to dirt or grease buildup. They’re also not suited to outdoor applications. In addition, while adding an overlay is a relatively quick way to convert a large display into a touchscreen, extra care must be taken in mounting that overlay to ensure touches match the image displayed on the screen.

Surface Capacitive Touchscreeens

Surface capacitive screens have a connective coating applied to the front surface and a small voltage is applied to each corner. Touching the screen creates a voltage drop, with sensors on the screen using that drop to pinpoint the location of that touch. Advantages of surface capacitive technology include low cost and a resistance to environmental factors, while disadvantages include an inability to withstand heavy use and a lack of multitouch capability. Those screens are also limited to finger touches; the technology won’t work if the user is wearing gloves. DVD rental company Redbox uses surface capacitive screens in their kiosks.

Multitouch Touchscreen Technology

Other types of touchscreen tech offer the potential of more complicated functions thanks to their ability to sense several touches at the same time. Multitouch applications might include functions performed with two or more fingers, such as pinching or zooming of images. Larger displays might allow for interaction using two hands or even two users.

SAW Touchscreen

Surface acoustic wave or SAW displays use piezoelectric transducers and receivers along the sides of the screen to create a grid of invisible ultrasonic waves on the surface. A portion of the wave is absorbed when the screen is touched, with that disruption tracked to locate the touch point.

“We tend to lead with surface acoustic wave,” Olea said.

“The transparency of the glass on an SAW panel is pretty good and the touch tends to be very stable and not require frequent calibration,” he said. “On the other hand, it doesn’t work well outdoors or anywhere there is grease or high amounts of dust, such as near parking lots, in warehouses things like that. Also, you can do 2-point touch on SAW although pinching, zooming, and applications such as on-screen signatures don’t work very well.”

Projected Capacitive or PCap Touchscreens

Last on the list of dominant touch technologies is projected capacitive technology. PCAP is a relative of capacitive touch, with the key difference being that they can be used with a stylus or a gloved finger. Projected capacitive touchscreens are built by layering a matrix of rows and columns of conductive material on sheets of glass. Voltage applied to the matrix creates a uniform electrostatic field, which is distorted when a conductive object comes into contact with the screen. That distortion serves to pinpoint the touch.
Milan Digital Kiosk - touchscreen technology
Projected capacitive and its cousin surface capacitive are relatively new technologies, similar to what’s in a smartphone. Both offer opportunities not possible with resistive and infrared touch screens.

“Capacitive technology is born and bred for multi-touch,” Olea said. “And because the touch technology is embedded in the glass it offers superior resistance to wear, vandalism and gives you a very clear, bright screen.”

Olea uses projected capacitive technology in all of its outdoor kiosk products.

“Projected capacitive screens are still fairly expensive compared with other types of touchscreens, mostly because the technology is new and there isn’t a ton of high-quality manufacturers out there making them,” Olea said. “Metal can also interfere with the function of the PCAP technology, so the integrator or kiosk designer should know what they are doing to ensure the product works as advertised.”

Choosing a Touchscreen

The final determination

Ultimately, the type of touchscreen a deployer chooses to incorporate into their application will be determined by factors including the deployer’s budget, the environment in which the device will be placed, the function the device will perform and the deployer’s plans for any future applications.

Order entry screens in the kitchens of a small fast-food restaurant chains would obviously call for resistive touch technology, for example, while a 72-inch display in a hotel lobby or shopping mall would call for infrared touch. An “endless aisle” or catalogue lookup kiosk where a shopper may want to enlarge an image of a particular product might work fine with a surface acoustic wave or surface capacitive screen, while wayfinding kiosks on a college campus or city street would likely call for projected capacitive technology.

Perhaps the deployer has plans to implement more advanced functions down the road, and wants to future-proof their investment. In that case, they may need to choose between a surface capacitive or projective capacitive screen.

At the end of the day, the best way to choose a touchscreen best suited to the application for which it will be used is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

ADA and Accessibility Touchscreen Access

One interesting aspect of touchscreens is which ones should I use for disabled users with prosthetics?

The answer is you need to use Infrared or Resistive touch technology as the prosthetic will generally not have a path to ground and that is required for something like PCap.

Related Posts

Touchscreen Surface Treatments

Antibacterial Kiosk Touchscreen Wipes Coatings

Kiosk Touchscreen Surface Treatments

Surface Treatment Touchscreens

Craig is a  senior staff writer for Kiosk Industry Group Association. He has 25 years of experience in the industry. He contributed to this article.

Sometimes it seems the last thing we put on a touchscreen is our finger. There are so many ways to customize a touchscreen and over the years they have continued to multiply. Whether its reflections, or vandals or privacy or what…There is always something new. Women with long fingernails are problematic. The only technology I have not seen is smart proximity sensing so people can’t look at the screen over your shoulder.

Introduction

What customers want when they ask for AR coatings is to reduce the ability to see oneself when looking at the display, especially when you are outside. AR coatings make the display easier to see.

In legacy touch products, glare reduction was done using anti-glare (AG) coatings. AG treatments are made by either coating the touch surface with silica “bumps” or lightly etching the glass. The result is that some of the light hitting the touch surface is diffused or scattered, and not reflected back at the user. This was good enough for 25 years of touch technology.

Then came Apple and their beautiful high-resolution display. To preserve that super display image, polished glass was used on the iPhone instead of the traditional AG treatment. It is kind of OK for mobile devices because you can tilt the surface to reduce reflections, but less easy to “fix” on bigger devices such as pads.

So the market is asking for something that reduces reflections but preserves that pretty little picture on the display. This has traditionally been done using anti-reflection treatments. Reflection reduction can be achieved in a number of ways, including moth-eye treatments, circular polarizers, eliminating the reflective surface, or that which I will talk about, multi-layer thin film interference coatings.

AR (Anti-Reflection)

AR Anti-Reflection Diagram
Diagram 1.1 (Courtesy of Wikipedia)

This treatment applies a film or coating of a specific thickness to the surface of a cover lens. The film reduces the reflections on the surface by canceling out a specific wavelength of light as it is reflected back to the consumer. When a specific wavelength of light passes through the AR material, some of it is reflected back to the consumer at the surface of the AR film (R1) and some of it is reflected at the surface of the cover lens (R2). The thickness of the AR film causes the reflected wavelengths (R1, R2) to be reflected exactly out of phase with each other (see diagram 1.1) so that they cancel each other out. Thus the consumer will not see their own reflection. Instead, they will see a brighter and more vivid display.

      • Problems/Fixes

        • Fingerprints – The fingerprint problem has been fixed with anti-fingerprint (AF) coatings. Recalling the description above, you know that the thin film coating must be the precise thickness of a light wave (say ¼ of the width) to work. Along comes your dirty, oily fingertip, laden with hand cream, to touch the screen. Boom, the oil you left on the AR coating has changed the thickness of the coating which reduces the ability to trap the light and most often shows up as a fingerprint. AF coatings work by resisting the ability of the oil on your finger to “stick” to the AR coating; these are called hydrophobic (fear of water) coatings. Of course, for the AR coating to work, the AF coating must be built into the precise thickness of the thin-film stack. Touch Guy is not impressed with the aftermarket spray-on AF coatings over AR stacks. Not impressed at all.
        • Wears Off – fact is you have an angstroms thick material in an abrasive and chemically active environment, and you have limited time before its anti-reflection properties go away, especially on frequently touched areas. There seem to be two solutions…the first is that the AF coating on the AR stack is made of (secret) tough material that will wear-off your fingertip (just kidding) before it gives up. The other is to use thicker, but less effective (2% reflection) organic AR coatings, that seem to have better resistance to finger wear. Another way around the AR wear problem is to eliminate the reflective surfaces in the first place.
        • Fix: An AG coating and an optically bonded p-cap touch panel eliminates the wear, and anti-fingerprint issues, with only a minor loss in display sharpness.

AG (Anti-Glare)

AG Anti-Glare Treatment
Diagram 1.2 (Courtesy of Information Displays)

This type of treatment involves creating a rough surface on the cover lens via an etching process. As light reflects off of the rough surface, it is scattered at different angles (see diagram 1.2) which reduces the clarity of the reflected image. Thus, the consumer will not see the bright glare of any reflected light source.

AF/AS (Anti-Finger Print)

This type of treatment reduces the ability of the cover lens retaining oils from your finger. AF/AS treatment is typically applied by vacuum deposition or by a liquid chemistry process, which creates an oleophobic top coating. Since this layer is a chemical modification of the glass surface, it is very durable compared to aftermarket AF/AS spray-on films and it is very thin with little or no impact on the optical quality of the display.

It has to be noted that AF/AS treatments do not perfectly prevent fingerprints. They only cause finger oils to bead on the surface, which makes them less noticeable and also much easier to clean off the screen.

Another benefit of the AF/AS coating is the “feel” or user perception of the treated surface. Because the surface is smooth, the finger will glide more easily compared to a non-treated surface. A non-treated cover lens surface can cause the user’s finger to stick, skip, feel like it’s being dragged, or even make drawing a singular line on the screen difficult so that it becomes a dotted line.

Oleophobic Coating

An oleophobic coating is an oil repellent coating. This means that it does not allow oil to absorb. A common oleophobic substance is water, but this quality can be produced on other materials with the help of treatment processes. The most useful aspect of oleophobic coatings are that they can make materials fingerprint-resistant because they repel the oils that are produced by the skin.

Sunglasses (Yes, sunglasses..)

Some outdoor high NIT touchscreens can come with what’s called “Circular Polarization Filters”.  This allows people with sunglasses to see the screen.  How Circular Polarizers work.

Protection Treatment

Many outdoor touchmonitors come with Tempered Glass and Anti-Reflective.

Tablets

Many tablets (and mobile phones) come with Gorilla Glass by Corning. Here is the pitch — Tough Corning® Gorilla® Glass is enabling slimmer, more lightweight laptops, notebooks and tablets with exceptional visual quality, while providing damage- and scratch-resistance from everyday handling and use.

AntiBacterial Coating AntiMicrobial Coating

This is a touchy subject for many…We have an entire page devoted to this subject. Our typical recommendation is treat it like your mobile phone, but better. Clean it everyday. There are excellent cleaners like PDI Easy Screen. Use them. It is not rocket science and oily, dirty, unwashed hands are a fact of life. It amazes me when I go to the airport or Costco and see how many men do not wash their hands leaving the lavatory. See AntiBacterial Coating page

UV Treatment

We have some experience here having won an award for developing such a system. These systems though are not to be taken lightly; there are liabilities that come with them. If you want to utilize UVB light treatment we recommend having employees manually do it off-hours when they are cleaning the screens. A high quality (and safe) manual system is less than $500.

ADA and Accessibility Touchscreen Access

One of the considerations for Accessibility is with Prostethics.  Some touchscreen technology does not work since there is no path to ground. PCap for example.  For those situations we recommend Resistive or Infrared touchscreen technology.

Privacy Screens for HIPAA and Privacy

Here is an example of kiosks with privacy screens on them. Typically 3M is the most popular. There are two-way and four-way screens and they act like windows blinds basically.  They orient generally horizontally but they can also do vertical.

Example of privacy screens. Image courtesy Olea Kiosks

 

More Site Related Information

Glass Treatments for Touch Screens: Anti-Reflective, Anti-Glare, Anti-Fingerprint

What are the differences (if any) in anti-reflective, anti-fingerprint, anti-smudge, and anti-glare?? Every piece of information I find ends up as a sales pitch. Can you clarify things for me?

 

http://www.en-touch.com/what-is-an-oleophobic-coating/

http://www.crizal.ca/en/the-benefits-of-crizal/smudge-resistance/

https://www.corning.com/gorillaglass/worldwide/en.html

How are Privacy Filters Made and How do they function?

 

Contributing Companies

 

Touchscreens – TDS Adds New “38” Line of PCap Touchscreens

TDSTOUCH-38 series, with sizes ranging from 10.1 to 55 inches, adopts widescreen HD LED LCD screen multipoint projected capacitive touch screen and terraced front frame structure, is an open frame touch display specially designed for KIOSK/ digital signage/ console and other self-service equipment to the integrator market.

TDS Touchscreen

Cover treatment:

  • Brightness customization offered a range from 500-1000 nits
  • Providing privacy filter / anti-glare and more extended functions according to the use environment

Constomers can choose to purchase our touch screen as AD displays alone, touch panel can be reduced and the cost as well.

 PCAP Touchscreen Features:

  • Smooth Human-Machine Interaction
  • Smooth Handwriting
  • Fast response
  • Projected Captive touch screen/10 touch point
  • Humanized anti-fingerprint

Physical Characteristics:

  • Easy installation
  • Variety modes of immobilization: can from side, up and down, behind different directions of assembly.
  • Well sealed: Sturdy and durable
  • Bench type front frame design; Cabinet surface
  • Front frame stage style seamless connection
  • Sealed with touch screen frame/waterproof /dustproof
  • 3MM touch cover plate passed through the intensive treatment
  • UL65090 standard

Touchscreen News – US TDS Touch Introduces Fanless PCAP Touchscreen

Touchscreen News – US TDS Touch Introduces Fanless PCAP Touchscreen

PCAP Touchscreen US TDS Touch introducing a 700-1500 NIT fanless series of open PCAP touchscreen display modules with ultra-low power consumption and automatic ambient light. Sizes range from 10.1 inches to 32 inches. The overall module is highly integrated with modular design, high resolution, high contrast, high brightness, and greatly enhances the layering of the picture.

PCAP Touchscreen Product Features:

  • Ultra-high brightness industrial grade LED backlight, integrated heat sink structure, stable and energy saving
  • The front panel is flat, IP65 standard, waterproof and dustproof. Brushed with aluminum profile metal, light
    and compact, changing the appearance of traditional high-brightness modules
  • The backlight uses industrial grade components, intelligent constant temperature, automatic ambient light
    perception, high reliability, good stability, automatic brightness adjustment, energy saving and environmental
    protection, especially suitable for working in harsh environments
  • The 10-point PCAP touch screen adopts a 3MM cover plate with a hardness of 7H, and the surface is anti-glare and tempered. Insulation and riot, anti-purple line. The image is clearly visible and suitable for public
    applications in semi-outdoor or unattended environment
  • Industrial grade UL certified power adapter for high temperature protection, surge protection, leakage
    protection, over-voltage protection
  • Highly expandable structure, back VASEB hole position 75X75MM, 100X100MM two group hole position, can be used with OPS host and MINIBOX
  • Customized open-end highlighting machine for Android system and Windows system

Layer Logic and TSItouch Join Forces to Drive Demand of Touchscreen Displays in the Enterprise

Layer Logic and TSItouch Join Forces on Touchscreen Displays in Enterprise

August 14, 2018 – Mason, OH and Uniontown, PA Layer Logic® Inc., a company dedicated to making collaboration seamless and spontaneous, and TSItouch, a leading manufacturer of touch screen and protective solutions for commercial grade displays and video walls announced they are partnering together to drive more touch display demand through the delivery of additional features and capabilities.
CoreTouch® is an award-winning intelligent appliance that allows users to connect and simultaneously control up to four devices on a single touchscreen display. Up until now, it has not been possible to connect multiple sources, such as PC’s, Macs, tablet devices, etc. to a display, and control those sources from the monitor itself. CoreTouch is the first of its kind – making group collaboration simple when it comes to
displaying, sharing and controlling content specific to a source. CoreTouch also supports the new annotation capabilities of Microsoft’s Office Suite, allowing for annotation from the monitor over live applications like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint as well as whiteboarding.
“Combining the CoreTouch appliance with our touchscreen solutions provides for increased utilization of these interactive displays,” commented Gary Mundrake, President at TSItouch. “This improves the value proposition and ROI of room designs in a time when customers are demanding broader usage of their meeting rooms.”
“Driving additional features and capabilities through touch displays will result in additional demand and sales,” commented Rich Reiss, CEO at Layer Logic. “And with the Layer Logic mobile app, we can reduce or eliminate the need for expensive control systems – freeing up more budget to design rooms and spaces in new and creative ways. We believe our partnership with TSItouch will result in benefits for both our channel partners and end user community.”
About Layer Logic
Layer Logic develops unique collaboration solutions for conference and huddle rooms that enable any user in the
room to switch presenters, change on-screen layouts, and control content and sources from their smartphone, tablet,
PC or an Interactive Flat Panel.
About TSItouch
TSItouch is a manufacturer of touch screen and protective solutions for commercial grade displays and video walls
that is dedicated to consistently providing our customers with high quality, cost-effective products and services.
TSItouch is an employee-owned business located in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. TSItouch was established as an
independent company in 2011.
Contact:
Layer Logic:
Kelly Harman
VP of Marketing
Kelly.Harman@layerlogic.com
703-505-3133
TSItouch:
Justin Fuss
Creative Director
justinf@tsitouch.com
724-871-7230

TDS Products – See New Lineup at DSE 2018

 TDS Touch New Products at DSE

TDS Touch Screens
Click for full size. This is just a sample of whats new.

TDS will be attending DSE-2018 show as an exhibitor, our Booth No#1854, we will prepare below products in this show:

 
1. TDS-38B&38C Open-Frame Touch Monitor (17″, 19″, 18.5″, 21.5″& 23.8″)
2. TDS-20C Touch AIO for Digital Signage (10.1″, 15.6″, 18.5″, 21.5″, 23.8″)
3. TDS-3220D AIO for Digital Signage (31.5″ 10-Points PCAP)
4. TDS-4339C Open-Frame Touch Monitor (43″, 10-Points PCAP)
5. TDS-5520D Touch AIO for Digital Signage (55″, 2000 High-brightness, 10-Points PCAP)
6. TDS-5520D Touch AIO for Digital Signage (55″, Project IR Touch, slim IR design)
For Open-Frame Touch Monitor, we have 3-year warranty,  for Digital Signage and big-size touch products, we supply 1-year warranty.

For More TDS Touch Information

To find out more about TDS information, please go to www.ustdstouch.com, or call the office.

Continue reading TDS Products – See New Lineup at DSE 2018

3M Files Patent Infringement Against Elo Touch Solutions

Source link

3M Files Lawsuit to Enforce Its Patent Rights in Metal Mesh Conductor TechnologyUsed in Touch Screens

ST. PAUL, Minn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–3M and 3M Innovative Properties Co. filed a patent infringement lawsuit in federal district court in Wilmington, Del., today against Elo Touch Solutions Inc.

“3M strives to provide its customers with the most innovative materials and solutions for their products. The company is committed to protecting its investments in research and development for projected capacitive technology and vigorously defends its intellectual property rights”

The suit alleges that certain Elo Touch projected capacitive products infringe 3M’s U.S. Patents 8,179,381, 8,274,494, 8,704,799 and 9,823,786.

Metal mesh conductor technology is widely used in the construction of projected capacitive touch sensors for consumer and commercial applications. Metal mesh conductors have broad applicability across touch sensors of all sizes, in particular, large-format touch sensors often utilized in interactive whiteboards, conferencing systems, casino gaming machines, digital signage displays, and fast-food self-ordering systems.

“3M strives to provide its customers with the most innovative materials and solutions for their products. The company is committed to protecting its investments in research and development for projected capacitive technology and vigorously defends its intellectual property rights,” said Makoto Ishii, vice president and general manager, 3M Display Materials and Systems Division.

Learn more about 3M Touch Solutions at www.3M.com/touch.

About 3M
At 3M, we apply science in collaborative ways to improve lives daily. With $30 billion in sales, our 90,000 employees connect with customers all around the world. Learn more about 3M’s creative solutions to the world’s problems at www.3M.com or on Twitter @3M or @3MNews.

Contacts

3M Media Contact:
Lori Anderson, 651-733-0831


Notes

Here is the actual complaint — ELO-3M-04313848846

Here are the patents involved:

Best Practice – Are All Touchscreens Created Equal?

Are All Touchscreens Created Equal?

Reprinted from TheLab by Olea

Interactive touchscreens come in several varieties. Here’s a quick overview of the types and the applications to which each is best suited.

Although interactive touchscreens have been around in one form or another since the late 1970s, over the past 10 years or so they’ve become an integral part of our lives.

In fact, thanks to the iPhone, tablet computers and similar devices, we’ve become accustomed to the idea that we should be able to touch the screens we see and get a reaction. Interactive touchscreens are a central feature of devices ranging from ATMs to wayfinding kiosks to the photo kiosks common in drugstores around the country.

A Research and Markets study valued the size of the interactive display market at $9.9 billion in 2015, with that market estimated to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 15.5 percent over the next five years, reaching $26.9 billion by 2022.

Interactive displays include a variety of technologies, though, and not every technology is suited to every application.

Stacking them up

According to the industry trade publication Control Design, there are five main types of touchscreens: resistive touch, infrared touch, surface capacitive, surface acoustical wave and projected capacitive. Each has its advantages, disadvantages and applications for which it is best suited.

A resistive touchscreen is made up of several thin layers, including two electrically resistive layers facing each other with a thin gap between. When the top layer is touched, the two layers connect and the screen detects the position of that touch.

“Resistive touch is a very old technology that some companies still offer as their go-to,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“It works great in places with dust and grease, such as fast food restaurants, and its low price point can make it attractive for those with a limited budget,” Olea said. “I personally don’t care for it because it makes the image on the screen appear hazy and it wears out over time.”

In addition, resistive-touch screens are unable to perform the multitouch functions that are becoming increasingly popular.

For very large displays, infrared touch is the most common application. Instead of a sandwich of screens, infrared touchscreens use IR emitters and receivers to create an invisible grid of beams across the display surface. When an object such as a finger interrupts the grid, sensors on the display are able to locate the exact point.

Advantages of infrared touch are excellent image quality and a long life, and they work great for gesture-based applications. In addition, scratches on the screen itself won’t affect functionality. In many cases, touch capability can be added to a display through the use of a third-party overlay placed on the existing screen.

On the downside, infrared touchscreens are susceptible to accidental activation and malfunctions due to dirt or grease buildup. They’re also not suited to outdoor applications. In addition, while adding an overlay is a relatively quick way to convert a large display into a touchscreen, extra care must be taken in mounting that overlay to ensure touches match the image displayed on the screen.

Surface capacitive screens have a connective coating applied to the front surface and a small voltage is applied to each corner. Touching the screen creates a voltage drop, with sensors on the screen using that drop to pinpoint the location of that touch. Advantages of surface capacitive technology include low cost and a resistance to environmental factors, while disadvantages include an inability to withstand heavy use and a lack of multitouch capability. Those screens are also limited to finger touches; the technology won’t work if the user is wearing gloves. DVD rental company Redbox uses surface capacitive screens in their kiosks.

The promise of multitouch

Other types of touchscreen tech offer the potential of more complicated functions thanks to their ability to sense several touches at the same time. Multitouch applications might include functions performed with two or more fingers, such as pinching or zooming of images. Larger displays might allow for interaction using two hands or even two users.

Surface acoustic wave or SAW displays use piezoelectric transducers and receivers along the sides of the screen to create a grid of invisible ultrasonic waves on the surface. A portion of the wave is absorbed when the screen is touched, with that disruption tracked to locate the touch point.

“We tend to lead with surface acoustic wave,” Olea said.

“The transparency of the glass on an SAW panel is pretty good and the touch tends to be very stable and not require frequent calibration,” he said. “On the other hand, it doesn’t work well outdoors or anywhere there is grease or high amounts of dust, such as near parking lots, in warehouses things like that. Also, you can do 2-point touch on SAW although pinching, zooming, and applications such as on-screen signatures don’t work very well.”

Milan Digital Kiosk - Grand Canal Shoppes

Last on the list of dominant touch technologies is projected capacitive technology. PCAP is a relative of capacitive touch, with the key difference being that they can be used with a stylus or a gloved finger. Projected capacitive touchscreens are built by layering a matrix of rows and columns of conductive material on sheets of glass. Voltage applied to the matrix creates a uniform electrostatic field, which is distorted when a conductive object comes into contact with the screen. That distortion serves to pinpoint the touch.

Projected capacitive and its cousin surface capacitive are relatively new technologies, similar to what’s in a smartphone. Both offer opportunities not possible with resistive and infrared touch screens.

“Capacitive technology is born and bred for multi-touch,” Olea said. “And because the touch technology is embedded in the glass it offers superior resistance to wear, vandalism and gives you a very clear, bright screen.”

Olea uses projected capacitive technology in all of its outdoor kiosk products.

“Projected capacitive screens are still fairly expensive compared with other types of touchscreens, mostly because the technology is new and there isn’t a ton of high-quality manufacturers out there making them,” Olea said. “Metal can also interfere with the function of the PCAP technology, so the integrator or kiosk designer should know what they are doing to ensure the product works as advertised.”

The final determination

Ultimately, the type of touchscreen a deployer chooses to incorporate into their application will be determined by factors including the deployer’s budget, the environment in which the device will be placed, the function the device will perform and the deployer’s plans for any future applications.

Order entry screens in the kitchens of a small fast-food restaurant chains would obviously call for resistive touch technology, for example, while a 72-inch display in a hotel lobby or shopping mall would call for infrared touch. An “endless aisle” or catalogue lookup kiosk where a shopper may want to enlarge an image of a particular product might work fine with a surface acoustic wave or surface capacitive screen, while wayfinding kiosks on a college campus or city street would likely call for projected capacitive technology.

Perhaps the deployer has plans to implement more advanced functions down the road, and wants to future-proof their investment. In that case, they may need to choose between a surface capacitive or projective capacitive screen.

At the end of the day, the best way to choose a touchscreen best suited to the application for which it will be used is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

Patent Granted: TSItouch Glass Retention Bezel System

TSItouch has officially received a patent for the Glass Retention Bezel System (GRBS). As of June 6 th , 2017, Patent #9,671,824 was issued to TSItouch LLC for the video wall monitor protective glass solution.

touchscreen glass retention The TSItouch GRBS provides an alternative solution to bonding cover glass. The GRBS is a cost effective, serviceable, and modular solution that allows protective glass (clear, anti-reflective, and anti-glare) to be mounted directly to each video wall display, providing protection to the OEM bezel and displays’ panel. In the event of a monitor
failure, the GRBS can be removed, avoiding any issues associated with servicing a bonded display.

Learn more about the patented protective glass system via the GRBS data sheet:

Visit here  to view a video illustrating the protective strength of the Glass Retention Bezel System.

For quotes and more information on this product, please contact our sales team:
sales@tsitouch.com
802-874-0123

TSItouch is a veteran owned small business located in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. The ompany was established in 1989 as a division within a defense contracting company
and re-established as an independent company in 2011. TSItouch is a manufacturer of touch screen and protective solutions for commercial grade displays and video walls.
For more information, visit http://tsitouch.com/

###

News for Elotouch – EOL Notice for Elo Touchscreen & New Website

Editor note: Elotouch is one of the must watch touchscreen vendors in the self-service kiosk space and they have a bit of news going on. The 17xx and 19xx openframe monitors have gone end of life and included here are the official notices from Elotouch. They have the new 90 series which is replacing them. Also Elotouch has just revamped their entire website and gone modern. Lots of whitespace and a little sparse. I think right now I like the old site better for getting part numbers and drawings.

ELO Notices for End-Of-Life touchscreen EOL

 

 

 

 

12 Month Transition Plan – 9 Months last time buy + 3 Months last time shipment

When products are obsolete, every effort is made for a smooth transition:

  • Last-time buys for the 1537L, 1739L, 2243L, and 2244L models will be accepted until February 27th ,
    2017 with last-time shipments made by May 27th , 2017
  • Last-time buys for the 1930L, 1931L, 1937L, 1939L, 1940L, and 2740L models will be accepted until March
    29th , 2017 with last-time shipments made by June 29 th , 2017
  • Please note that it is possible that some of these models such as the Infrared and SCAP units
    cannot be ordered as their components may have gone EOL already. Please consult with your
    sales representative for specific part numbers and details
  • Please work closely with your Elo sales representative on specific ongoing run-rate projects to
    develop a transition plan to the new units.

 

Elotouch Touchscreen official EOL notices

PMB 622

PMB 621

 

Touch Screen – Elo Announces New 70-inch Interactive Display with 10-touch

Product Information

Elo is pleased to announce the new 7001LT 70” Interactive Digital Signage display featuring 10-touch infrared capability. Infrared touch technology provides higher touch sensitivity and brightness to give ‘tablet-like’ performance in a giant 70″ size. The low profile design integrates beautifully into modern interior designs for retail, office, hospitality, or public space applications. The 7001LT delivers undistorted display clarity due to use of clear glass with four key features:

  • 10-touch infrared technology delivers smooth and highly responsive multi-user interaction
  • Auto-switching between active input sources eases use in meeting rooms
  • Support for serial control input with use of adapter cable (included)
  • Wider VESA 600×600 mounting points (Elo wall mount kit E248743)

The 7001LT is a high-quality, interactive canvas for engaging shoppers; and for office meeting collaboration. A new video input auto-detect feature will switch the display to the last good video input signal from the internal computer module or other external video sources. The 7001LT offers system integrators and value-added resellers (VARs) a high performance solution that is easy to deploy and maintain in public environments. With a total thickness of 3.7 inches (94 mm), the 7001LT is ADA and IBC compliant for wall-mounted installations. State of the art full HD display and video technology is utilized including a high contrast/brightness LED-backlit LCD panel, extended color gamut with movie/ gaming/photo modes, black level adjustment, and on-screen menu enhancements.

Optional, high performance computer modules are available which turn the 7001LT into a completely integrated all-in-one computer—without the need for any cables or additional mounting hardware. Computer modules are available in a choice of two models: ECMG2-i3, based on a 3.3GHz Intel Core i3 processor and graphics.

Product landing page

Product datasheet

7001LT Key Features

  • Touch technology: 10-touch infrared, HID compliant
  • 69.5” diagonal 16:9 active matrix TFT LED-backlit LCD
  • Active Display Area 60.6” x 34.1” (1538.9 x 865.6 mm)
  • Dimensions: 62.9” x 3.7” x 36.4” (1600 x 94 x 925 mm)
  • Native resolution: full HD 1920 x 1080, other resolutions supported
  • Brightness of LCD panel: 500 nits typical
  • Contrast ratio: 5000:1 typical
  • Viewing angle: 176°H/176°V
  • Video interfaces: HDMI, DisplayPort, VGA
  • Typical power consumption: 201 W
  • Weight: 149.5 lb (67.8kg)
  • Audio: 4 x 5W stereo speakers for stereo operation in landscape and portrait modes
  • Ambient light sensor: Automatic panel brightness adjustment
  • Intel OPS compliant with available adapter kit
  • Warranty: 3 years standard with additional 2 year warranty and on-site exchange available in US
  • EloView™ remote management capability

Part Number

Part NumberProduct DescriptionMarketing Description
E008823ET7001LT-9UWA-0-MT-GY-G7001LT 70-inch wide interactive digital signage display, VGA, HDMI & DisplayPort video interface, infrared 10-touch, optional computer module, worldwide-version, Clear, Gray

 

Computer Modules

Part NumberModelProcessorRAMHDDOS
E776797ECMG-i3Intel Core i3 3.3GHz HD25002 GB320 GBNo OS
E487570ECMG-i3Intel Core i3 3.3GHz HD25002 GB320 GBWindows 7
E272400ECMG-i5Intel Core i5 3.6GHz HD40004 GB320 GBNo OS
E584199ECMG-i5Intel Core i5 3.6GHz HD40004 GB320 GBWindows 7
E009007ECMG2-i3Intel Core i5 3.6 GHz HD40004 GB320 GBWindows 8.1

 

Other Accessories

MSR (E545781), NFC Adapter (E918074), OPS Kit (E102270), Replacement OSD Controller (E483757), Replacement Cable Kit (E000263), Wall Mount Kit (E248743), Webcam (E688656)

Paper Ink Touchscreen and Plays Music in This Super-Cool British Food Poster

Paper Ink Touchscreen
Paper Ink Touchscreen

Who says print is dead? If anything, it’s alive and sounds delicious! This unique poster, created by Grey London and print production and software developer Novalia, is essentially an app made of paper promoting British food brand Schwartz’s Flavour Shots.

 

Craig Keefner‘s insight:

Pretty cool touchscreen using ink

See on www.adweek.com