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Room Scheduling – 22Miles Partnership with Crestron

Digital Signage and Wayfinding News 22Miles

Leading Automation and Control Solutions company joins with the Digital Signage and Wayfinding technology provider 22Miles to provide customers with flexible integration.

Milpitas, CA – July 1, 2020 – Award-winning global leader in experiential 3D wayfinding and digital signage technology, 22Miles Inc., announces a partnership with Crestron Electronics to offer integrated room scheduling solutions for customers. The partnership brings greater efficiencies to the end users who take advantage of 22Miles digital signage and Crestron’s collaborative enterprise solutions.

Establishing mutually beneficial partnerships has long been a priority to 22Miles leadership team. Within the last year, the company has established in-roads with other high-tech industry players spanning equipment providers, computer & tech companies, and others. Crestron’s reputation for offering top-of-the-line, scalable, and customized A/V, Unified Communications, and Video Distribution solutions fits well with 22Miles’ ongoing commitment to serving the agile workplace market with the best technology available.

The 22Miles interface features a new “Quick edit” and “Pro edit” mode, which will allow users of all levels to dig in and complete their projects, their way. This functionality simplifies processes such as room booking while leveraging additional features such as wayfinding and hoteling. Ultimately, this facilitates user creation of unique settings and behaviors, handle check-in and end meetings, send auto-cancellation, as well as customize everything from meeting room images to a range of associated functions.

Aside from enhancing administrative controls to create a more agile workplace, 22Miles focused on building flexible integration capabilities. The system has been engineered to support Microsoft Exchange on both the cloud and enterprise solutions and includes integrations with Office 365, Google Calendar, Condeco, EMS, and other popular platforms.

“Crestron develops high-tech solutions for every market, from enterprise and UC automation to scalable collaboration tools,” said Bob Bavolacco, 22MILES CrestronDirector of Technology & Partner Programs for Crestron.

“22Miles and Crestron have numerous mutual customers and by working together, we create flexible solutions for every project. Having the 22Miles native room scheduling application for Crestron 7” and 10” TSS-series touchscreens, for example, makes it easier for the A/V integrator to simply select 22Miles as the room scheduling application to be enabled, and then the touchscreen now becomes a dedicated 22Miles scheduling interface. It’s all about simplicity and ease-of-use

Crestron communicates seamlessly with the 22Miles solution. Crestron’s touch panels also feature built-in red and green light bars. These Crestron Tablet with 22MILESilluminated bars complement the 22Miles room booking solution, visually displaying whether rooms are booked or available.“In 2020 we are focusing on agile workplace solutions,” said 22Miles EVP Tomer Mann. “Crestron’s latest touch panels pair well with the 22Miles H5 player app. The opportunity to bundle this app into the Crestron system allows end-users expanded choice when it comes to their setup. With our new Publisher Pro.AIoT, a core feature like room booking with hoteling, for example, lets even a novice user quickly do things such as enable meeting extensions, info, and pop-ups, and even change room images, themes, backgrounds and logos in the new quick edit mode. This version 6 editing tool is available right on top of Crestron’s touch panel functionality. It really is a win/win partnership on so many fronts.”

22Miles is on pace to continue expanding their integration partnerships as they draw closer to the release of the newest version of their greatly enhanced Digital Signage Content Management system, Publisher Pro.AIoT.

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Thermal Imaging Cameras – FDA Recommendations

As discussed further below, scientific studies support that certain telethermographic systems, also known as thermal imaging systems, may be used to measure surface skin temperature. These systems include an infrared thermal camera and may have a temperature reference source. In this document, they are referred to as thermal imaging systems.

Thermal imaging systems and non-contact infrared thermometers (NCITs) use different forms of infrared technology to measure temperature. For information about NCITs, please refer to the fact sheet on Non-contact Infrared Thermometers.

Thermal Imaging Systems and COVID-19

  • When used correctly, thermal imaging systems generally have been shown to accurately measure someone’s surface skin temperature without being physically close to the person being evaluated. Thermal imaging systems offer certain benefits in that other methods need a closer proximity or contact to measure temperature (for example, non-contact infrared thermometers or oral thermometers).
  • Temperature-based screening, such as thermal imaging, is not effective at determining if someone definitively has COVID-19 because, among other things, a person with COVID-19 may not have a fever. A diagnostic test must be performed to determine if someone has COVID-19.
  • Thermal imaging systems have not been shown to be accurate when used to take the temperature of multiple people at the same time. The accuracy of these systems depends on careful set-up and operation, as well as proper preparation of the person being evaluated.
  • Thermal imaging systems have been used by several countries during epidemics, although information about their effectiveness as part of efforts to reduce the spread of disease has been mixed.
  • The FDA issued the Enforcement Policy for Telethermographic Systems During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Public Health Emergency guidance to help expand the availability of thermal imaging systems and mitigate thermometer shortages during the public health emergency. The guidance sets forth an enforcement policy that is intended to apply to all thermal imaging systems that are intended for medical purposes for the duration of the public health emergency related to COVID-19, and provides recommendations regarding performance and labeling of such systems.
Figure one: A picture of an infrared thermal camera pointed at a woman standing by herself in a public space. The camera displays her thermal image on the camera screen. Her face is shown on the screen in a reddish orange color indicating her skin has a higher surface temperature than her clothing displayed as yellow and the distant background displayed as gray. The temperature displayed on the screen as 31.7o Celsius.

Figure 1 demonstrates the proper thermal imaging setup for processing of individual people in a public area.

Benefits of Thermal Imaging Systems

  • The person who handles the thermal imaging system is not required to be physically close to the person being evaluated. In fact, the person who handles the thermal imaging system could be in a different area or room.
  • The thermal imaging system may measure surface skin temperature faster than the typical forehead or oral (mouth) thermometer that requires a close distance or physical contact with the person being evaluated.
  • Scientific studies show that, when used correctly, thermal imaging systems generally measure surface skin temperature accurately.

Limitations of Thermal Imaging Systems

  • Although these systems may be in use for initial temperature assessment to triage individuals in high throughput areas (for example, airports, businesses and sporting events), the systems have not been shown to be effective when used to take the temperature of multiple people at the same time. They should not be used for “mass fever screening.”
  • These systems measure surface skin temperature, which is usually lower than a temperature measured orally. Thermal imaging systems must be adjusted properly to correct for this difference in measurements.
  • These systems work effectively only when all the following are true:
    • The systems are used in the right environment or location.
    • The systems are set up and operated correctly.
    • The person being assessed is prepared according to instructions.
    • The person handling the thermal imaging system is properly trained.

Proper Use of Thermal Imaging Systems

The person who handles the system should follow all manufacturer instructions to make sure the system is set up properly and located where it can measure surface skin temperature accurately.

The person who handles the system should be trained to properly prepare both the location where the system will be used, and the person being evaluated, to increase accuracy. For details, see the standards and scientific papers listed under References below.

Preparing the Area where You will Use a Thermal Imaging System

  • Room temperature should be 68-76 °F (20-24 °C) and relative humidity 10-50 percent.
  • Try to control other items that could impact the temperature measurement:
    • Avoid reflective backgrounds (for example, glass, mirrors, metallic surfaces) to minimize reflected infrared radiation.
    • Use in a room with no draft (movement of air), out of direct sunlight and away from radiant heat (for example, portable heaters, electrical sources).
    • Avoid strong lighting (for example, incandescent, halogen and quartz tungsten halogen light bulbs).
An illustration of a person standing at a fixed distance directly facing an infrared thermal camera. Behind the person is a low reflective background and calibrated black body at the person’s head height. The camera is connected to a laptop.

Figure 2 demonstrates the proper thermal imaging room setup.

Preparing the Thermal Imaging System

  • Some systems require the use of a calibrated blackbody (a tool for checking the calibration of an infrared temperature sensor) during evaluation to make sure measurements are accurate. Check the manufacturer’s instructions to determine if a calibrated blackbody is needed. Some devices do not require one.
  • Turn on the entire system 30 minutes before use to warm it up.

Preparing the Person Being Evaluated

The person handling the system should make sure the person being evaluated:

  • Does not have any face obstructions before measurement (such as a mask, glasses, hat, headband, or scarf), the person’s hair is pulled away from the face, and the person’s face is clean and dry.
  • Does not have a higher or lower face temperature from wearing excessive clothing or head covers (for example, headbands, bandanas) or from using facial cleansing products (for example, cosmetic wipes).
  • Has waited at least 15 minutes in the measurement room or 30 minutes after exercising, strenuous physical activity, bathing, or using hot or cold compresses on the face.
Picture of the infrared thermal image of a man standing in front of a plain wall with a small square blackbody background on the wall. His face is shown in a dark red color indicating a higher skin surface temperature than his clothing that is shown in blue and yellow. The blackbody background is shown in very dark brown indicating minimized reflection of infrared radiation. A temperature range scale bar to the right of the picture shows a color range from dark brown through the color spectrum to dark blue.

Figure 3 demonstrates the proper thermal imaging setup for processing of individual people using a calibrated blackbody background.

Using the Thermal Imaging System

  • Measure only one person’s surface skin temperature at a time.
  • Position the person at a fixed distance (follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use) from the thermal imaging system, directly facing the camera.
  • The image area should include the person’s whole face and the calibrated blackbody, if using one.
  • If an increased temperature is seen using the thermal imaging system, you should use a different method to confirm a fever. Public health officials can help you determine if the fever is a sign of infection.

Questions about Using Thermal Imaging Systems during COVID-19

Q: Are thermal imaging systems effective for screening people for fevers in places like nursing homes, airports, and hospital emergency rooms?

A: When using a thermal imaging system, it is important to assess whether the system will provide the intended results in high throughput areas. We understand that these devices are being used for initial temperature assessment and triage of individuals for elevated temperatures in medical and non-medical environments. They should not be used for measuring temperatures of many people at the same time in crowded areas, in other words “mass fever screening” is not recommended.

Based on where the system will be used, there may be more appropriate methods to initially assess and triage people, especially if there is a risk that infected people would not be identified right away. For example:

  • In a nursing home, inaccurate temperature measurement or a missed contagious person without a fever could spread infection among nursing home residents. So, in this case, other assessment options and following infection control practices may be more effective.
  • In airports, workplaces, grocery stores, concert venues, or other areas where you are trying to screen large groups of people for mass fever screening, diagnostic testing may be too difficult because of the time and costs needed to screen and get results. These systems will likely miss most individuals with COVID-19 who are contagious. Thermal imaging systems could be considered as one method for initial temperature assessment in these types of settings when used as part of a larger approach to risk management.
  • In a hospital emergency room, a thermal imaging system may help to quickly assess temperature and triage patients to determine who needs more evaluation or isolation.

Q: Are thermal imaging systems effective as the sole means of diagnosing COVID-19?

A: No. A fever or higher body temperature is only one possible symptom of a COVID-19 infection. Thermal imaging systems generally detect a high body temperature accurately when used appropriately. They do not detect any other infection symptoms, and many people with COVID-19 can be contagious without a fever. Also, a high body temperature does not necessarily mean a person has a COVID-19 infection.

All fevers measured by thermal imaging systems should be confirmed by another method and followed by more diagnostic evaluations for other symptoms, as appropriate.

Q: How can thermal imaging systems help with the COVID-19 response?

A: To help address urgent public health concerns raised by shortages of temperature measurement products and expand the availability of telethermographic systems used for initial body temperature for triage use during this COVID-19 public health emergency, the FDA is applying regulatory flexibility for certain telethermographic systems as outlined in its enforcement policy.

When a high body temperature is identified by thermal imaging, an additional evaluation should follow (for example, doctor evaluations or interview, laboratory testing and patient observation).

Q: Are thermal imaging systems used for body temperature assessment considered medical devices?

A: As discussed in the enforcement policy, telethermographic systems are devices when they are intended for a medical purpose. To determine if these products are intended for a medical purpose, FDA will consider whether:

  1. They are labeled or otherwise intended for use by a health care professional;
  2. They are labeled or otherwise for use in a health care facility or environment; and
  3. They are labeled for an intended use that meets the definition of a device, for example, body temperature measurement for diagnostic purposes, including in non-medical environments.

Q: How does a thermal imaging system differ from a thermometer?

A: Both thermal imaging systems and non-contact infrared thermometers (NCIT) can measure surface temperatures without contact. An NCIT measures surface temperature in a single location, whereas a thermal imaging system can measure temperature differences across multiple locations, creating a relative temperature map of a region of the body. The enforcement policy in the guidance applies to use of thermal imaging systems to determine initial body temperature measurements.

There is a separate enforcement policy that applies to certain NCITs and other clinical electronic thermometers: Enforcement Policy for Clinical Electronic Thermometers During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Public Health Emergency.

References

Note, this information is applicable to thermal imaging systems that are intended for a medical purpose. This means that the system is intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease and, therefore, meets the definition of “device” set forth in Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

For more information on FDA’s policies for these devices, and recommendations on their design, labeling, and use during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency, please review the following:

Enforcement Policy for Telethermographic Systems During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Public Health Emergency: Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff

Additional information on these devices can be found at:

IEC 80601-2-59: Medical electrical equipment – Part 2-59: Particular requirements for basic safety and essential performance of screening thermoghraphs for human febrile temperature screening. 2017, International Electrotechnical Commission & International Organization for Standardization.

ISO/TR 13154: Medical electrical equipment — Deployment, implementation and operational guidelines for identifying febrile humans using a screening thermograph. 2017, International Organization for Standardization.

Ghassemi, P., et al. (2018). “Best practices for standardized performance testing of infrared thermographs intended for fever screening.” PLoS ONE 13(9): e0203302External Link Disclaimer.

Comparing Temperature Sensor Devices

  • Industrial infrared temperature sensors are inexpensive and used everywhere in home and industrial. Your microwave for example.  They read surface temperature if aimed properly and clean and calibrated (all sensors require cleaning and calibration)
    • The Heimann sensor is the first we encountered. The HPTA32x32 (64 pixel) “thermopile array”.
    • Melexis makes several models (all TO-39)
    • Mitsubishi, Elo and many others make these.
    • They have been adapted for reading temperatures of foreheads basically and are at the low end of the accuracy scale.
    • None of these are FDA approved or submitted.
  • Thermal Imaging Cameras
    • These are a whole magnitude higher weight-class.  Several of them are specifically designed for supplemental elevated body temperature.  They do this by zooming and focusing on specific areas of the face like tearducts.  IR Arrays have limited spatial resolution and must average many regions and samples in order to provide a general value.
    • FLIR is the manufacturer most used.  They have several which certified by FDA and others submitted.
    • Another option is ICI though there are some questions on FDA 510 (we cannot locate them) as well as some components used.

 
Temperature Related More Reading

Temperature Kiosk Commentary

As government and corporate America develop post-COVID-19 action plans for responsibly reopening the country, some businesses are scrambling to keep up with the demand for thermal cameras, which many believe can help identify novel coronavirus cases via elevated temperature detection.

We see many RFPs from governmental agencies for temperature and thermal sensing devices.  Federal such FEMA and the Veterans Administration among them.

There are also several pitfalls and challenges with this technology when it comes to detecting somebody with an elevated body temperature. Things that can affect the accuracy of the measurement are:

  • Makeup
  • Physiological Stress
  • Sweating
  • Insufficient Camera Resolution
  • Measuring the wrong location on the face
  • Not using a reference black body for calibration
  • Using the wrong camera
  • Subject motion

Some observations:

  • The fact that the key measurement is temperature would seem to imply that the manufacturer has a superior device or at least a documented device. Does your supplier describe the sensor for you, or do they provide specifications?
  • Some solutions utilizing non-FDA-approved devices in the cause of health condition check have been withdrawn due to potential liability issues the device manufacturer might be subjected to.
  • Does the camera support a black body calibration?
  • Cameras have a NETD factor which is basically the noise floor it will factor and then read the signal. Almost like squelch discrimminators in RF radios. Being able to filter noise out from the measurement is crucial. What is the factor and spec?
  • ADA and height can be a factor — Some solutions provide AI which automatically detects the face and focuses. Others will not.
  • Reflected light impacts the measurement. In junior high I entered the Science Fair and for my project I demonstrated Albedo.  A black man or a hispanic or a white person can all measure differently.
  • Are you reading body temperature or facial temperature.

In conclusion, the most important questions to ask a potential supplier are:

  • What is the spatial resolution?
  • How long has your solution/camera been on the market?
  • Has your solution been used successfully during the SARS outbreak?
  • What is the ideal distance to subject during screening?
  • Does your camera have a 510k approval?
  • How many pixels?

Temperature Sensor Device Examples

  • Industrial infrared temperature sensors are inexpensive and used everywhere in home and industrial. Your microwave for example.  They read surface temperature if aimed properly and clean and calibrated (all sensors require cleaning and calibration)
    • The Heimann sensor is the first we encountered. The HPTA32x32 (64 pixel) “thermopile array”.
    • Melexis makes several models (all TO-39)
    • Mitsubishi, Elo and many others make these.
    • They have been adapted for reading temperatures of foreheads basically and are at the low end of the accuracy scale.
    • None of these are FDA approved or submitted.
  • Thermal Imaging Cameras
    • These are a whole magnitude higher weight-class.  Several of them are specifically designed for reading elevated body temperature.
    • FLIR is the manufacturer most used.  They have several which certified by FDA and others submitted.
    • Another option is ICI though there are some questions on FDA 510 (we cannot locate them) as well as some components used.

Temperature Screening Kiosk KMA Public Service Announcement

From KMA Global Jun2020

Temperature Kiosks Advisory and Caution – Public Service Announcement

By KMA Manager | June 29, 2020

As government and corporate America develop post-COVID-19 action plans for responsibly reopening the country, some businesses are scrambling to keep up with the demand for thermal cameras, which many believe can help identify novel coronavirus cases via elevated temperature detection.

We see many RFPs from governmental agencies for temperature and thermal sensing devices.  Federal such FEMA and the Veterans Administration among them.

There are also several pitfalls and challenges with this technology when it comes to detecting somebody with an elevated body temperature. Things that can affect the accuracy of the measurement are:

  • Makeup
  • Physiological Stress
  • Sweating
  • Insufficient Camera Resolution
  • Measuring the wrong location on the face
  • Not using a reference black body for calibration
  • Using the wrong camera
  • Subject motion

Some observations:

  • The fact that the key measurement is temperature would seem to imply that the manufacturer has a superior device or at least a documented device. Does your supplier describe the sensor for you, or do they provide specifications?
  • Some solutions utilizing non-FDA-approved devices in the cause of health condition check have been withdrawn due to potential liability issues the device manufacturer might be subjected to.
  • Does the camera support a black body calibration?
  • Cameras have a NETD factor which is basically the noise floor it will factor and then read the signal. Almost like squelch discrimminators in RF radios. Being able to filter noise out from the measurement is crucial. What is the factor and spec?
  • ADA and height can be a factor — Some solutions provide AI which automatically detects the face and focuses. Others will not.
  • Reflected light impacts the measurement. In junior high I entered the Science Fair and for my project I demonstrated Albedo.  A black man or a hispanic or a white person can all measure differently.
  • Are you reading body temperature or facial temperature.

In conclusion, the most important questions to ask a potential supplier are:

  • What is the spatial resolution?
  • How long has your solution/camera been on the market?
  • Has your solution been used successfully during the SARS outbreak?
  • What is the ideal distance to subject during screening?
  • Does your camera have a 510k approval?

Too often we see these days a rush to market by vendors all over the world all touting their thermal imagers without specifications.

It is worth noting that the FDA issued wide guidance when antibody test kits were being offered. Rather than test them they went the open market test route which resulted in many thousands of people being misdiagnosed and localities and countries (UK e.g.) spending millions of dollars and getting the wrong results.

Additional questions relating to FDA should be asked:

  1. Y or N — Is it tested and labeled 80601?
  2. Y or N – do you have test results of alternative performance criteria currently allowed by FDA
  3. Y or N – is there prominent labeling that this device cannot be used as sole measurement?
  4. Y or N – is there a clear indicator that the device is NOT approved by FDA?
  5. Y or N – is there a clear description of the main device along with its specifications and calibration procedures?

More Temperature Kiosk Resources

  • Non-contact Infrared Thermometers
  • Thermal Imaging Systems (Infrared Thermographic Systems / Thermal Imaging Cameras)
  • From FDA 2020 — Measuring a person’s temperature can be done in several ways. One method to measure a person’s surface temperature is with the use of non-contact infrared thermometers (NCITs). NCITs may be used to reduce cross-contamination risk and minimize the risk of spreading disease. While typically 98.6°F (37.0°C) is considered a “normal” temperature, some studies have shown that “normal” body temperature can be within a wide range, from 97°F (36.1°C) to 99°F (37.2°C). Before NCITs are used, it is important to understand the benefits, limitations, and proper use of these thermometers. Improper use of NCITs may lead to inaccurate measurements of temperature.
  • From FDA — The FDA issued the Enforcement Policy for Telethermographic Systems During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Public Health Emergency guidance to help expand the availability of thermal imaging systems and mitigate thermometer shortages during the public health emergency. The guidance sets forth an enforcement policy that is intended to apply to all thermal imaging systems that are intended for medical purposes for the duration of the public health emergency related to COVID-19, and provides recommendations regarding performance and labeling of such systems.

This is the letter from the FDA in April 2020 on Enforcement Policy that companies might try and use.

FDA recommends that the device:

1) Is tested and labeled consistent with the following standard: IEC 80601-2-59:2017: Medical electrical equipment – Part 2-59: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of screening thermographs for human febrile temperature screening; OR

2) Is tested using alternative performance specifications that provide similar results to IEC 80601-2-59:2017. This could include:

a) The laboratory temperature accuracy of a screening telethermographic system, including the measurement uncertainty, is less than or equal to ±0.5°C (±0.9°F) over the temperature range of at least 34-39°C (93.2-102.2°F);

b) The system includes an accurate blackbody temperature reference source; 10

c) Both stability and drift are less than 0.2°C (0.36°F) within a timeframe specified by the manufacturer; and

d) The device risk assessment addresses all potential safety issues, including: i) Electrical safety; ii) Electromagnetic compatibility; iii) Mechanical safety; iv) Excessive temperatures and other hazards; v) Accuracy of controls, instruments, and information display; vi) Considerations for software associated with Programmable Electrical Medical Systems including network connections;11 and vii)Usability.

In addition, FDA recommends that the devices described above use labeling that helps users better understand the device, such as:

1) The labeling includes a prominent notice that the measurement should not be solely or primarily relied upon to diagnose or exclude a diagnosis of COVID-19, or any other disease;

2) The labeling includes a clear statement that: a) Elevated body temperature in the context of use should be confirmed with secondary evaluation methods (e.g., an NCIT or clinical grade contact thermometer);12

10 This is usually a blackbody (idealized physical body that absorbs all incident electromagnetic radiation) with known temperature and emissivity that can be used for thermal drift compensation.

11 For more information on this recommendation, see Clause 201.14 of IEC 80601-2-59: 2017. 12 This labeling recommendation is consistent with IEC 80601-2-59: 2017. Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 6 b) Public health officials, through their experience with the device in the particular environment of use, should determine the significance of any fever or elevated temperature based on the skin telethermographic temperature measurement; c) The technology should be used to measure only one subject’s temperature at a time; and d) Visible thermal patterns are only intended for locating the points from which to extract the thermal measurement.

3) The labeling includes a clear description of:

a) Device performance specifications and the methodology and frequency of any calibration needed to maintain the labeled specifications;12

b) How to use the thermal image to make a temperature measurement to within the stated device accuracy;

c) A description and purpose of the blackbody reference source (used for thermal drift compensation) and its importance in obtaining an accurate temperature assessment;

d) The reference body site used for temperature estimation, including any calibration or correction needed to estimate the temperature at that location, and the accuracy of the measurement at the reference site (e.g., oral, tympanic membrane);

e) How different environmental and system setup factors can affect the measurement, including the body site chosen for measurement, the condition of the screening site (e.g., screening background, ambient temperature and humidity, airflow);13

f) Different factors to consider in the design of the facility protocol (e.g., installation, viewing angle, blackbody temperature reference source); 14

g) The installation procedures and qualification testing that should be performed during installation or when imaging equipment is being relocated;15 and

h) The appropriate imaging distance based on the spatial resolution and performance of the camera. 16

4) The labeling references and is consistent with the guidelines in ISO/TR 13154: 2017: Medical electrical equipment — Deployment, implementation and operational guidelines for identifying febrile humans using a screening thermograph; and

5) The labeling highlights the differences in design, indications, or functions, as applicable, compared to the unmodified, FDA-cleared version of the product or includes a clear identification that the device is not FDA-cleared or approved. For the current edition of the FDA-recognized standard(s) referenced in this document, see the FDA Recognized Consensus Standards Database. 17

For more information regarding use of consensus standards in regulatory submissions, refer to FDA guidance titled “Appropriate Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards in Premarket Submissions for Medical Devices.”

If you would like to understand more about the models and options that are available KMA is happy to provide information on any and all advertised solutions. As always we recommend beginning with members of the KMA who understand and observe standard regulations such ADA, FDA, EMV, PCI, HIPAA and UL.


Proper Use of NCITs

The person using the device should strictly follow the manufacturer’s guidelines and instructions for use for the specific NCIT being used. The manufacturer’s instructions for use typically include the following information and recommendations for proper use:

Preparing the Environment and NCIT:

The use environment may impact the performance of the NCIT. Instructions will typically include recommendations for optimal use, such as the following:

  • Use in a draft-free space and out of direct sun or near radiant heat sources.
  • Determine if conditions are optimal for use. Typically, the environmental temperature should be between 60.8-104 ºF (16-40 ºC) and relative humidity below 85 percent.
  • Place the NCIT in the testing environment or room for 10-30 minutes prior to use to allow the NCIT to adjust to the environment.

Cleaning Between Uses:

For cleaning NCITs between uses, follow the instructions in the Cleaning and Disinfecting section of the product instructions. Most NCITs should never be immersed in water or other liquids.

Preparing the Person being Evaluated:

In preparation for taking a temperature measurement with an NCIT, the person using the NCIT should typically ensure that

  • The test area of the forehead is clean, dry and not blocked during measurement.
  • The person’s body temperature or temperature at the forehead test area has not been increased or decreased by wearing excessive clothing or head covers (for example headbands, bandanas), or by using facial cleansing products (for example cosmetic wipes).

Using the NCIT:

As previously noted, the person using the device should strictly follow the manufacturer’s guidelines and instructions for use for the specific NCIT being used. In particular, the following are typical instructions for NCIT usage.

  • Hold the NCIT sensing area perpendicular to the forehead and instruct the person to remain stationary during measurement(s). (See Figure 1)
  • The distance between the NCIT and forehead is specific to each NCIT. Consult the manufacturer’s instructions for correct measurement distances.
  • Do not touch the sensing area of the NCIT and keep the sensor clean and dry.

Figure 1: Correct Use – Forehead unobstructed, and NCIT perpendicular to forehead & used at distance identified in manufacturer’s instructions

Figure 1: Correct Use – Forehead unobstructed, and NCIT perpendicular to forehead and used at distance identified in manufacturer’s instructions.


Figure 2: Incorrect Use – Not perpendicular to forehead

Figure 2: Incorrect Use – Not perpendicular to forehead


Figure 3: Incorrect Use –Forehead exposed to direct sunlight outdoors

Figure 3: Incorrect Use – Forehead exposed to direct sunlight outdoors


References

Note, this information is applicable to NCITs which are intended for a medical purpose which means that the NCIT is intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease and, therefore, meets the definition of “device” set forth in Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

Enforcement Policy for Clinical Electronic Thermometers During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Public Health Emergency

Guidance on the Content of Premarket Notification [510(K)] Submissions for Clinical Electronic Thermometers

U.S. National Library of Medicine: MedlinePlus. (2019 February). Body Temperature Norms. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001982.htm

ASTM E1965-98(2016),Standard Specification for Infrared Thermometers for Intermittent Determination of Patient TemperatureExternal Link Disclaimer, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2016, www.astm.org DOI: 10.1520/E1965-98R16

ISO 80601-2-56:2017(E) Medical electrical equipment – Part 2-56: Particular requirements for basic safety and essential performance of clinical thermometers for body temperature measurementExternal Link Disclaimer. 2017, International Organization for Standardization.

BOCA Releases New Kiosk Printer for Receipt, Ticket, Label or Wristband Applications

LemurX Receipt and Ticket Printers

BOCA’s Lemur-X kiosk printer is the company’s most compact, economical model.

Like all BOCA printers, the Lemur-X is produced at the company’s factory in Boca Raton, Florida and configured to the customer’s specifications.

The Lemur-X can be produced to work with a range of media, including receipt rolls, fan folded tickets, or wristbands. The printer’s universal paper guide (or ‘UPG’) can support a range of widths.

Optional features include:

  • Large roll holder (up to 7” diameter)
  • Bezel: holds one or more receipts or tickets after printing.
  • Presenter/Retractor: holds the receipt or ticket in place after printing and retracts if not taken by the customer within a prescribed period.
  • RFID
  • Ethernet, WiFi or Bluetooth interfaces
  • Low paper sensor

To see the printer in action, please check out the following video:

See video from Boca Systems on new models of Lemur X.  Great stuff!

Brochure for Lemux-X Download

For more information contact Louis at Boca Systems

Moe’s Southwest Grill First Kiosk-Only Restaurant is Now Open

Moe’s Southwest Grill launched its first-ever kiosk-only restaurant this past weekend in Pittsburg, PA.

The kiosk-only restaurant, owned and operated by Moe’s multi-unit franchisee, Mike Geiger, seats 16 and features Moe’s new brand design. The build took approximately 10 months to complete, with the final inspection scheduled for one day after the city shut down due to COVID-19 (March 13).

This timely launch provides a more contact-less ordering option in the time of Covid-19, as well as additional sanitation efforts have been put in place in accordance with CDC guidelines. This is just the latest in a string of new product offerings and technological advancements the brand has put into place since March of this year. Other examples include:

  • A completely revamped app which launched earlier this month
  • Launch of Taco Kits for easier family-style dining at home
  • The announcement of Moe’s Market, where stores would sell bulk ingredients that were in low stock at local markets.
  • Free delivery via the Moe’s app March 16-April 17
  • Ramped up curbside dining
  • Across Moe’s more than 700 restaurants, provided thousands of meals to healthcare workers and first responders

Background Summary

Touchless Interface Solution Self-service kiosks – KioTouch

New software product release by KioWare

KioTouch™

KioTouch™, a revolutionary, touchless interface solution for self-service kiosks, is now available for download. KioTouch is KioWare Kiosk System Software’s actionable response to the COVID-19 global pandemic and will prevent the spread of potentially harmful microbes and pathogens between end-users.

Empowering Users with Touchless Control

Mobile device to interacting with kiosk
KioTouch allows the end-user to control a self-service kiosk using their own personal mobile device. The user scans a QR code, generated on the screen of the kiosk, which then opens a trackpad-style mouse interface on their device that can be used to send commands to the kiosk. Scrolling, swiping, and clicking gestures allow the user to interact with the kiosk as they normally would, but do not require the user to physically touch it. KioTouch also allows users to input specific information into custom fields using the keyboard on their mobile device, safely and securely.

Works On Any Kiosk

KioTouch works on any kiosk and does not require KioWare to be installed to run, nor does it require the user to install any apps or software on their device. This gives you flexibility when implementing this health and safety software into your kiosk network without requiring you to complete a total overhaul of the system software you currently have installed and keeps the experience totally convenient for the user!

Upsell & Marketing Opportunities Maximized

The kiosk deployer has the ability to capture more conversions and potential customers by implementing session-end content that will be displayed on the user’s mobile device after their session is over. The deployer can load in a simple “thank you” message as well as surveys, newsletter sign-ups, coupons, app downloads, and more!

WATCH: A KioTouch Demo

 

More KioWare Kiosk Software Information

KioWare for Windows Version 8.24 with KioTouch

Asus Tinker Android Kiosk DIY mini PC KioWare OS & ASUS Team Up

Android Kiosk Software – KioWare for Android has a new release – version 3.18.

KioWare for Windows Version 8.24 with KioTouch

6/18/2020
YORK, PENNSYLVANIA — A new version update of KioWare for Windows has been released. Version 8.24 for Windows is now available with many improvements that work toward the company’s goal of constantly improving user experience.

KioTouch™ Integration

KioTouch™ is a touchless interface solution for self-service kiosks and is now integrated into KioWare for Windows. KioTouch™ allows end-users to interact with the kiosk through their mobile device and does not require they touch the surface of the kiosk at all. Click here to learn more about KioTouch™.

Implement FreedomPay EMV

KioWare, once again, expanded its EMV toolbelt by adding support for another EMV chip processor.

More Options for Error Handling Page

KioWare now has more options for error handling including displaying the error page, an option to do nothing, displaying an error page if there is no content, and displaying a simple message if necessary.

Add Option to Disable VK Click Sound

The virtual keyboard within KioWare now has the option to enable and disable the “click” sound that plays when interacting with it.

Add PDF Support to Attract Looper

KioWare has added the ability for network administrators to add PDF files to their attract screen loopers making the software more file-diverse.

Update to Latest Agora SDK

KioCall now supports the SDK – Agora version 3.0 release.

Update to Chrome 81/CEF 4044

KioWare has been updated to be compatible with the recent Chrome 81 release.

Analytical Design Solutions, Inc. dba KioWare has been in business since 1991 providing IT consulting to businesses of all sizes, is located in York, Pennsylvania, and is a worldwide market leader in self-service kiosk and purposed device markets. KioWare is kiosk system software that kiosk applications are built on and is used in over 13,000 projects in over 120 countries with project deployments that range from a handful to many thousands of kiosks.

Tech Brief – Limits of elevated body temperature screening

First published on Vision Systems Design Jun2020

Everything you need to know about using thermal imaging cameras for identifying potentially sick people.

Elevated body temperature screening

As government and corporate America develop post-COVID-19 action plans for responsibly reopening the country, some businesses are scrambling to keep up with the demand for thermal cameras, which many believe can help identify novel coronavirus cases via elevated temperature detection

During the SARS outbreak in 2002, the same demand occurred, albeit on a much smaller scale and mainly in Asia. As with most infectious diseases, people want to keep it from spreading.  Fever represents a common COVID-19 symptom.  Sometimes a person with a fever may not feel particularly sick and may still attempt to travel or come to work. Afraid of being booted off a plane or sent home, the motivation for self-reporting a potential illness quickly outweighs the consequences. Technology offers an attractive route for companies looking to screen for sick people. Companies feel severe economic pressure to reopen their businesses to survive, while other essential businesses fear that a company outbreak could bring them to a screeching halt, as has happened in the food and restaurant industries.

Several methods to check somebody’s temperature exist (Figure 1), but the larger the company, the less practical it becomes to have a medical professional use a handheld thermometer to screen everyone entering the building. This method is somewhat invasive and not conducive to social distancing guidelines, which is why non-contact thermal imaging has emerged as a popular alternative.

Thermal camera solutions pop up like mushrooms as demands soar. MoviTHERM has counted 52 new solutions just in the past eight weeks in the US. Many of these are brand new startups, while others simply rebrand mass produced existing, commercially available thermal cameras. Offerings range from cell phone attachments with low resolution thermal cameras to dual view thermal and visible cameras with built in artificial intelligence for tracking people in a crowd. Marketing literature and demonstration videos from such companies may impress the panic buyer looking for a way to keep their workforce safe. What used to take engineers weeks and months of research is now being decided in 24 to 48 hrs. Even Amazon bought 1,500 thermal cameras for $10 million from a US Government-blacklisted Chinese supplier.

How hard can it be? A thermal camera is a thermal camera! Or is it?

If that was the case, why do the prices of these cameras vary from $400 to $40,000?  It isn’t just the thermal camera that matters, it is how it is being applied to the application. Measuring elevated body temperature happens to be a rather complex application once you peel back the layers. After all, this does not involve simply measuring the temperature of a piece of steel but measuring the temperature of living beings under various conditions. Throwing a startup company together and hiring a few software developers to get an image out of a thermal camera is missing the point entirely. Thermal imaging uses some rather complex physics and involves optics, thermodynamic laws, emissivity, atmospheric variables, thermal drift compensation, infrared radiation, reflection, transmission, and in the case of this application, a slew of physiological effects of the human body.

Thermal cameras cannot detect a fever or diagnose any disease. A thermal camera can only measure the infrared radiation emitted from the first surface it encounters. When pointed at a face, this first surface happens to be the surface of the skin. However, when examining the thermal landscape of a human face, one will quickly notice the complexities. Additionally, such measurements vary tremendously from individual to individual.

Figure 2: The tear duct region of the face (inner canthus) offers the most accurate part of the face when it comes to optical temperature measurementFigure 2: The tear duct region of the face (inner canthus) offers the most accurate part of the face when it comes to optical temperature measurement

Accurate measurements

Scientific research shows that most of the facial skin temperature is not even that closely correlated to the body’s core temperature. The human body thermoregulates its core temperature using a complex biological closed-loop system. It either exerts excess heat, conserves it, or maintains equilibrium, and it does so as a survival mechanism. This regulation causes the skin temperature to vary based on environmental condition (passive heating or cooling due to exposure to the elements), physical exercise, or other biological processes.

Studies show that the inner canthus (tear duct region) represents the most accurate part of the face when it comes to optical temperature measurement (Figure 2). The inner canthus is only about 5 to 7 mm in size. Using a thermal camera, the inner canthus needs to be covered with enough pixels for an accurate measurement. The projected pixel size for the inner canthus area needs to be around 1.5 mm/pixel or better for best results.

Table 1: Common detector resolutions and the corresponding recommended image size for inspection.Table 1: Common detector resolutions and the corresponding recommended image size for inspection.

Camera resolution vs. image size

Unlike typical machine vision or surveillance cameras, thermal cameras have low pixel resolutions. The most common resolution for thermal cameras is 320 x 240 or 640 x 480 pixels. Using the 1.5 mm/pixel figure from above makes it possible to calculate the field of view size of the thermographic measurement setup for measuring elevated body temperature.

For a 320 x 240-pixel detector, the horizontal field of view is therefore 320 pixels / 1.5 mm per pixel = 480 mm [18.9in.]. Other common detector resolutions and the recommended image size for inspection can be seen in Table 1.

Figure 3: An accuracy test of a thermal camera with 464 x 348-pixel resolution and 24° optics are shown here, with e= 0.98 representing camera’s emissivity setting and atmos referring to atmospheric reflection. These parameters must be set in the camera for accurate measurements, as an object absorbs, reflects, and may transmit infrared radiation.Figure 3: An accuracy test of a thermal camera with 464 x 348-pixel resolution and 24° optics are shown here, with e= 0.98 representing camera’s emissivity setting and atmos referring to atmospheric reflection. These parameters must be set in the camera for accurate measurements, as an object absorbs, reflects, and may transmit infrared radiation.

Crowd scanning solutions

Based on the resolution criteria discussed above, crowd scanning solutions cannot produce the desired results. Artificial intelligence also does not help to bend physics and has no impact on human physiology. In addition to the pixel resolution problem, a second issue exists that impacts the accuracy of a crowd scanning camera – depth of field. In a crowd setting, individuals will be present at different distances to the camera. Not only does this change the projected pixel size, but it changes how well the pixels are in focus.

Figure 3 shows an accuracy test of a thermal camera with 464 x 348-pixel resolution with 24° optics. The test subject’s oral temperature was confirmed with a clinical grade thermometer prior to the test and determined to be 37°C [98.6°F]. Measurements were taken of both subjects starting from 0.5 m [1.64 ft] to 6 m [19.7 ft]. The maximum skin temperature (inner canthus) was recorded and graphed. This experiment shows a significant temperature drop with increase of distance. The camera used is a higher end thermal camera – the FLIR Model T540. Performing the same experiment with a lower grade and lower resolution camera will undoubtedly yield worse results.

Camera accuracy

Absolute accuracy represents an even bigger issue with these types of cameras. Such cameras are based on the same measurement principle and use a microbolometer type detector. These detectors do not capture photons, but directly measure infrared radiation. Each pixel comprises a small MEMS structure and represents a small temperature dependent resistor. The downside of these detectors is extreme temperature sensitivity. The slightest change in heat causes a bias in the measurement. The same thing happens with infrared optics made from Germanium or other exotic optics. These effects, along with noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) create the error budget of these cameras. An achievable absolute accuracy specification is typically around +/- 2°C. Controlling the temperature drift to any tighter tolerances requires a sophisticated active heating and cooling system inside the camera, which would be cost prohibitive.

Some manufacturers claim their cameras can achieve an accuracy of +/- 0.5°C. The question people should consider is how the cameras measure accuracy. One way of achieving this would be to point the camera at a reference black body and rapidly take successive measurements before the camera drifts. Doing so would be cheating if the companies omit their method of determining accuracy, however.

Figure 4: A black body is an actively temperature-controlled device that provide a reference source for calibrating thermal cameras and other optical temperature sensors such as pyrometers.Figure 4: A black body is an actively temperature-controlled device that provide a reference source for calibrating thermal cameras and other optical temperature sensors such as pyrometers.

Black body method vs. relative difference

Two legitimate methods for measuring elevated body temperatures exist. One employs a calibrated reference source (or black body, Figure 4) and the other uses a baseline population to create an average for outlier detection. Using a black body allows the camera or software to calibrate out the long-term drift and correct the absolute temperature of the measurements to better than +/- 0.5°C. For this to occur properly, the black body must be visible in the field of view of the camera at the same working distance as the subject.

The other method does not require a black body and makes use of the repeatability of the thermal camera, although combining the two methods would be ideal. In the relative difference mode, 10 known healthy individuals present to the camera or screening system. Their maximum facial temperatures are taken to build an average baseline temperature. Now all subsequent subjects are measured and compared against that baseline reference. This creates an outlier detection. The baseline needs to be updated throughout the day to compensate for environment changes like temperature swings.

What is a black body?

A black body or calibrated reference source is an actively, temperature-controlled device. Black bodies typically provide a reference source for calibrating thermal cameras and other optical temperature sensors, such as pyrometers. These devices consist of an active surface with a special high emissivity coating, an internal temperature sensor and a closed loop (PID) temperature controller. Some black bodies have an adjustable temperature controller, simpler devices have a single, fixed temperature. For special high temperature applications, there are cavity style black bodies available. The name black body comes from physics – black body radiation. The name was given because the idealized version of a black body absorbs all radiation of all wavelengths. However, some practical limitations to this exist. A perfect black body would have an emissivity value of 1. However, most good black bodies only achieve an emissivity value of 0.98 or lower.

Planck’s law describes black-body radiation. The higher the radiated energy, the shorter the wavelength. This phenomenon can be seen when heating up a piece of metal. The heat cannot be seen until it reaches a certain energy level, then the piece of metal starts to faintly glow red. As the energy further increases, red becomes orange, orange becomes bright yellow. The wavelength shifts from the infrared region into the visible region and becomes perceptible by human vision (400 nm to 700 nm).

Rules and regulations

In the US, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) deems this a medical application. As such, cameras need to have a 510k approval (bit.ly/VSD-510). Any customer or vendor using a camera without such an approval risks being subject to recalls and/or stringent corrective action measures, which is exactly what happened during the SARS outbreak. Although the FDA recently issued a non-binding and temporary guideline to ease their regulatory overview, the 510k ruling is still in place and may be enforced at any time. Besides the FDA, there is also a heightened risk of civil litigation for companies using a non-approved camera.

In conclusion, the most important questions to ask a potential supplier are:

  • How long has your solution/camera been on the market?
  • Has your solution been used successfully during the SARS outbreak?
  • What is the ideal distance to subject during screening?
  • Does your camera have a 510k approval and can you send it me?

More Information

Temperature Kiosk with Remote Services Frank Mayer & Associates, Inc.

Temperature Kiosk – KMA

Contactless kiosk – temperature screening kiosks – Pyramid

Temperature Check – 22MILES Thermal Sensing FAQ

Self-Service Kiosk News Roundup

Today Self-Service kiosk News

Interesting kiosk news from around the globe. We don’t formally post these but we do find them notable for multiple reasons usually.

June

  • McDonalds Kiosks — McDonalds permanently closing Times Square Flagship. Link.  McDonald’s confirmed this week that the company has made the “difficult decision” to close the famed corporate store in Times Square, a move that was in the works prior to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Healthcare Kiosks — as news reports detail the impact COVID-19 will have on our population and the healthcare system that serves it, many medical facilities have put systems in place to streamline services and keep frontline workers safe…… — Link
  • Budget Considerations for Self-Service Kiosk Success — Link — carefully consider each of these five high-level areas in solution budgeting – they will all come up. This is a macro view of the main elements of project budget, and supplier evaluation considerations that can most effect your budget
  • Touchless Hand Sanitizer Kiosk video —
  • Custom America announces the availability of the all new D4 desktop label printer – read more about the new product release here:
  • Appetize on “What is a Virtual Kiosk” — Virtual Kiosk allows guests to instantly access mobile ordering on their smartphone. It uses QR or Quick Response Codes– a surprisingly easy to use technology– to bring guests directly into the ordering site.
  • Evoke Partners with Core Intelligence on Distancing Application — We’re excited to partner with Evoke Creative for CORE | Intelligence Powered By FastSensor, designed to allow business owners to monitor social distancing in real-time through our groundbreaking, AI technology, all while allowing you to get to know your customers better than ever.
  • Frank Olea Podcast with 16:9 — Excerpt on touchless — Yeah, it’s fun. It’s gimmicky. But yeah, getting the public to change their behavior is gonna be really hard. I mean, it ‘s about the path of least resistance, right? So unless it’s easier, it’s not gonna happen.
  • New telemedicine kiosk option from Lilitab —  Introducing new Telemedicine Tablet Cart. It’s perfectly suited for any healthcare environment to be wheeled into patient rooms allowing doctors to “see” their patients at a safe distance. It meets all ADA requirements for lying, seated, and standing positions with self-adjusting tilt.
  • FDA Makes Hand Sanitizer Recommendations — FDA advises consumers not to use any hand sanitizer manufactured by Eskbiochem SA de CV in Mexico, due to the potential presence of methanol (wood alcohol), a substance that can be toxic when absorbed through the skin or ingested. FDA has identified the following products
  • Video Call Kiosks from KIOSK —  Compunetix is pleased to announce a partnership with KIOSK Information Systems (KIOSK) to deliver Video Call Center™ (VCC) on digital kiosks. Compunetix Video Call Center (VCC) for Healthcare is a browser-based, real-time voice and video workflow solution for healthcare providers that need to remain available to their patients in a safe and secure manner.
  • Walk-In Testing Kiosks in South Korea
  • Moviegoers return as Cinemark cautiously reopens — Cinemark is the first major theater chain in North Texas to reopen its doors, welcoming customers Friday at locations in West Plano, McKinney and northwest Dallas off of Webb Chapel. It will resume operations at other locations on a rolling basis in the coming weeks.
  • Electronic Shipping Kiosks — D’Arrigo California has implemented shipping kiosks at their shipping facility in Salinas, CA. This innovative tool, which contains a proprietary software program, was developed to improve efficiencies of the shipping process. D’Arrigo California’s investment in the electronic shipping kiosks and its proprietary software program demonstrates its commitment to provide efficiencies throughout its supply chain.
  • Will PPE Dispensing Kiosks Attract Travelers?
  • MetroClick/faytech Launches Sanitization Solution with Thermal Sensing for Retail, Hospitality and Travel Companies LINK
  • Ontario International Airport adds PPE kiosks in passenger terminals — LINK
  • California Re-Opens 169 DMV Offices – Recommends DMV Now kiosk for transactions – LINK
  • Touchless Sales Kiosks scam in Canada – Link

Earlier

  • Burroughs Pitches Kiosks – link
  • Telemedicine Kiosks Sav-On Canada link
  • Health Safety Kiosk from MPS – link

Feb 2019 – Wow Bao Expansion

Wow Bao announced further expansion plans within the East Coast market. In quarter one 2020, Wow Bao will open three new locations at some of the largest transportation hubs in the region, including Dulles International Airport, Boston Logan International Airport and Raleigh-Durham International Airport.  https://www.qsrmagazine.com/news/wow-bao-plots-east-coast-expansion-2020

Dec 2019 Vending Machines for Water

Californians are turning to vending machines for safer water. Are they being swindled?
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/dec/02/california-water-vending-machines-quality

Nov 2019 – Sports Betting Kiosk, Moe’s Grill, CLEAR Airport Expansion

Senecas to open sports betting at three WNY casinos10 shareshttps://www.newyorkupstate.com/casinos/2019/11/senecas-to-open-sports-betting-at-three-wny-casinos.htmlHogansburg in northern New York. Under New York state law, sports bets can only be placed in person, through a betting window or kiosk physically located inside a casino. There is no online or mobile sports betting through phones or other devices. Bets can be
Moe’s Southwest Grill To Open First All-Digital Restaurant In Oakland136 shareshttps://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2019/11/26/all-digital-moes-coming-to-pittsburgh/Mayer and Associates, a company that designs and sells kiosks to restaurants. Anzia said both customers and restaurants like them. “One of the biggest impacts we’ve seen with self-ordering kiosks, restaurants are seeing an uptick of 25 to 30 percent on
CLEAR’s Latest Expansion: Chicago-O’Hare Terminal 1by Kyle Potter . 37 shareshttps://thriftytraveler.com/clears-latest-expansion-chicago-ohare-terminal-1/signed up (more on this shortly) and finalized your registration, you simply head to the CLEAR lane, confirm your identity at a kiosk, and get whisked away to the front of the TSA line by a CLEAR ambassador.     So what’s stopping you? Likely the high price
Three Square Self Pay Market opens at CherryVale Mall2 shareshttps://www.wifr.com/content/news/Three-Square-Self-Pay-Market-opens-at-CherryVale-Mall-565492691.htmlself-pay basically comes from not being bothered by lines and such.” Ward says there’s a tutorial on the check procedure at the kiosk. The market is also under 24-7 surveillance, so if a customer has a question, they can reach someone within minutes.

 

More Kiosk News Links from Kiosk Manufacturers Association

 

Kiosk RFPs

Touchless

Smart City Kiosk RFP

Five Reasons Restaurant Need Self-Service Kiosks – GRUBBRR

From blog on GRUBBRR Jun2020

Eating out is a common feature of our social and personal lives. Everything from dates to important client meetings often happens at a restaurant, yet, there have been minimal changes to the way in which we obtain our food. Customers are changing and so are their habits, but because of the lack of a better alternative, clients continue to experience the hassles of waiting in line to order their food and dealing with incorrect orders. Lines, waiting, delays, and other inadequacies have become a routine part of the restaurant experience. Luckily, the perfect solution to this problem already exists — self-service kiosks.  

What is a Self-Service Kiosk? 

A self-service kiosk is a device that allows the user to complete a task or activity via a machine and without the need for human assistance. In restaurants, customers can use self-service kiosks to place their orders and make payments. With perks like shorter lines and streamlined order management, this new and improved way of ordering is guaranteed to make the restaurant experience more efficient for customers, restaurant owners, and restaurant employees. 

Why Do We Need Self-Service Kiosks? 

Here are 5 reasons why your business needs self-service kiosks: 

  1. Coronavirus Concerns

At a time when everything has changed because of the current pandemic, COVID-19 has impacted customer-restaurant relationships as well by creating new uncertainties and barriers in terms of restaurant accessibility.  

Moreover, government-sanctioned social distancing policies have changed how we order and eat. Most restaurants are extensively utilizing online ordering and contactless delivery to minimize the spread of the virus.  

Now more than ever, the need for reducing human contact is being realized, and this could be the perfect opportunity for restaurants to revolutionize the way customers interact with restaurants. 

By ushering in self-service kiosks, restaurants will give clients a sense of comfort and safety in knowing that they can receive their food with minimal human interaction. 

  1. Less Waiting for Customers

Self-service kiosks have shown to shorten and even eliminate lines. Reduced wait times ensure that customers get their food as quickly as possible. A convenient and user-friendly online ordering experience lets your clients seamlessly order their food. 

  1. Less Anxiety for Customers

Since using self-service kiosks shortens lines, customers are able to get to their orders quicker, and without any lines behind them, they are able to focus more on what they want to order instead of worrying about holding up the line. 

  1. Fewer Inaccuracies and Inconsistencies in Ordering

When customers enter their orders directly into the system, there are fewer chances of errorWith the removal of the cashier as an intermediary, the order goes directly from the customer to the kitchen, so the hances of any miscommunication are minimized. Self-service kiosks along with other business automation technology have the capacity to provide an in-sync way for restaurant employees to manage customers, orders, and payments in one place.  

  1. IncreasRevenue by Upselling

The freedom that self-ordering provides directly correlates with increased revenue. Automated upselling via self-service kiosks is shown to increase revenue by 12-22%. Algorithmically calculated suggestions during the ordering process give your customers that final push they need to add items to their order that they were previously on the fence about. 

Self-service kiosks can completely revolutionize the restaurant experience. By providing comfort and ease of access, self-service kiosks ensure maximum efficiency for customers and restaurants alike. 

Related Information

Android Payment Solutions For ISVs

From Press Release by Worldnet Jun2020

Worldnet Payments And Esper Launch Android Payment Solutions For ISVs

Seattle, WA & Atlanta, GA – 23rd June 2020, Esper and Worldnet Payments announced the global launch of the first complete set of Android payment solutions for independent software vendors (ISVs) and product development teams. Worldnet, a trusted global provider of omni-channel payment solutions, has partnered with Esper’s Android DevOps solution to offer a streamlined pathway to developing, deploying, and managing Android payment products for retail, hospitality, restaurants, and other industries.

“Collectively, Esper and Worldnet offer a complete set of cloud developer tools to speed up product development and streamline payment upgrades to Android device fleets,” says Shiv Sundar, COO of Esper. “Developers can use our connected platforms and cloud APIs to rapidly create custom integrations and programmatic control over payments, devices, apps, and peripheral hardware.”

Both Esper and Worldnet’s cloud tools are created by developers, for developers with open standards and industry-leading ease-of-integration. Together, Worldnet and Esper’s cloud tools can allow developers to unlock a seamless approach to managing Android mobile-point-of-sale (mPoS), kiosks, contactless devices, and more. It’s the first partnership to offer complete control over through a single cloud platform over every aspect of payments, apps, and hardware.

  • Payment Processing
  • Merchant Banking
  • Provisioning & Deployment
  • Device Management
  • Hardware & Peripherals

“Individually, Worldnet and Esper each have a remarkable track record of success enabling ISVs and System Integrators (SIs) to streamline integrated product development,”  says John Clarke, CEO of Worldnet Payments. “Our Android mobile payments partnership offers a clear pathway for product developers to accelerate self-service and contactless payment innovation and achieve a seamless approach to managing payment devices.”

About Worldnet Payments

Worldnet Payments develops frictionless payments solutions for independent software vendors. The company’s omni-channel platform is used to deliver expert solutions in industries such as unattended retail, transportation, and services. Worldnet’s flexible approach enables businesses to deliver a customized payment experience to their customers, including tailored workflows, branding and centralized reporting and analytics. The highly scalable cloud platform provides an advanced range of EMV-enabled products and services across channels including eCommerce, Mobile, PoS and iPoS.

For more information, contact marketing@worldnettps.com or visit www.worldnetpayments.com

About Esper

Esper offers the industry’s most powerful cloud tools for Android device deployment and application management. Our platform and cloud APIs help organizations across industries go beyond traditional mobile device management to Android DevOps.

https://esper.io/

Media Contacts

Worldnet Payments

Cassandra Buckley
marketing@worldnettps.com
+1 (470) 372-1601

Esper

Shiv Sundar
shiv@esper.io
+1 (916) 759 – 8231


More Android News

Asus Tinker Android Kiosk DIY mini PC KioWare OS & ASUS Team Up

So Which is Better for Visitor Registration? The iPad or the Android…

Telehealth Kiosks — Compunetix and KIOSK Information Systems Partnership

From PRNewswire Jun2020 –

Enabling Innovative Telehealth Solutions on Digital Kiosk Devices


MONROEVILLE, Pa.June 17, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Compunetix is pleased to announce a partnership with KIOSK Information Systems (KIOSK) to deliver Video Call Center™ (VCC) on digital kiosks. Compunetix Video Call Center (VCC) for Healthcare is a browser-based, real-time voice and video workflow solution for healthcare providers that need to remain available to their patients in a safe and secure manner. Built on WebRTC technology, VCC supports high definition video connections, secure and encrypted media and data connectivity, video call transfer and routing, and mobile access via smart devices such as phones and tablets. This HIPAA compliant solution enables secure communication with no download or application installation.

With one touch, patients have instantaneous access to an active network of medical professionals throughout the world. Rather than waiting for help and further constraining limited resources, patients can use a kiosk to get secure, face-to-face virtual assistance. This digital approach to patient care is gaining adoption as a preferred mode of communication as more people opt for the direct connection and convenience that technology provides.

“With greater volume and complexity of patient needs, healthcare organizations need better ways to connect with patients at scale that can enable a more personal experience while at the same time improve operational efficiency. In partnership with Compunetix, our joint telehealth solution offers healthcare facilities and insurance providers the ability to help patients, face-to-face virtually – from service questions to advanced care access – all without the need to travel or wait at high traffic facilities,” shares Kim Kenney, President of KIOSK Information Systems.

“As the global leader in self-service systems for businesses, KIOSK provides a flexible new platform for our Video Call Center solution, especially in the healthcare markets where the combined solution offers a powerful and accessible new paradigm for distributed services,” explains Gerard Pompa, Compunetix Senior Vice President and Manager of the Communications Systems Division.

As healthcare organizations look to technology for better ways to connect with patients, Compunetix and KIOSK can enable an improved and more efficient experience. We are pleased to be exhibiting at this year’s ATA Virtual Conference and Expo. ATA2020 is the world’s largest telehealth innovation event. Join us and other providers, developers, and leaders as we come together virtually to have an in-depth, thoughtful, critical discussion about the future of health.

About Compunetix: For over 50 years, Compunetix has been providing advanced communications solutions all over the world, building and maintaining a reputation for reliability, customer service, product quality, and technological excellence that others simply cannot match. Compunetix is the leading developer of converged VoIP, voice, video, and data collaboration and conferencing applications for service providers, government, and corporate enterprise markets. Combined with world-class support and innovative professional services, Compunetix delivers the right solution, every time.

For more information, contact Robert Haley at rhaley@compunetix.com or visit www.compunetix.com

About KIOSK Information Systems: KIOSK helps organizations digitally transform by enabling automation with self-service solutions to improve the customer experience, while increasing operational and cost efficiencies. With over 27 years of experience and 250,000+ kiosks deployed, KIOSK is the trusted partner of Top 100 Retailers and Fortune 500 clients; delivering proven expertise in design engineering and manufacturing, application development, integration, and comprehensive support services. We offer an innovative portfolio of kiosk solutions along with managed services and IoT capabilities to ensure a seamless user experience. Learn more at kiosk.com, 800.509.5471

SOURCE Compunetix

Contact KIOSK For More Information

 

More News From KIOSK

KIOSK Information Systems Releases New IoT Remote Monitoring Platform Features

Conversational AI Kiosk – Valyant AI & KIOSK Information Systems Enable Contactless Conversational AI

Bitstop and KIOSK Information Systems Announce Bitcoin ATM Partnership at NRF Big Show 2019

Peerless-AV Launches New Health Protocol Solutions

Peerless-AV has announced today the launch of its newest health protocol solutions to assist businesses with public health and safety needs.

The new products include an Occupancy Control Kiosk, three variations of Temperature Sensing Digital Signage Kiosks, as well as Temperature Sensor Tabletop and Floor Stand Mounts, that will allow businesses to communicate and implement proper health standards in real time.

These new health solutions are made in the USA and available for immediate deployment in a variety of settings, such as corporate, retail, hospitality, education, transit and more.


Peerless-AV® Creates Multiple Health Protocol Solutions to Assist with Occupancy Control, Temperature Sensing, and more

New solutions, from tabletop and floor stands, to small and large format integrated kiosks that are completely customizable to assist businesses with public health and safety needs

AURORA, Ill. – June 11, 2020 – Peerless-AV®, an award-winning designer and manufacturer of the highest quality audio and video solutions and accessories, is pleased to share the availability of new solutions for public health preparedness and viral transmission prevention. The new products include an Occupancy Control Kiosk, three variations of Temperature Sensing Digital Signage Kiosks, as well as Temperature Sensor Tabletop and Floor Stand Mounts that will allow businesses to communicate and implement proper health standards in real time. These new health protocol solutions are made in the USA and available for immediate deployment in a variety of settings, such as corporate, retail, hospitality, education, transit and more.

“We took the time to research what type of solutions were needed to keep both employees and customers safe and satisfied,” said Brian McClimans, VP Sales, Peerless-AV. “We looked into a variety of different studies, surveyed consumers and had detailed discussions with our current customers to develop these products, and we firmly believe these solutions will become a part of prevention protocols all industries are implementing as the country begins to reopen.”

Peerless-AV’s lightweight and durable Temperature Sensor Stand Mounts (THR-100-COUNTER, THR-200-STAND) are offered for tabletop or floor applications. With installer-friendly features, such as internal cable management and clearance holes in the base to secure the mount to a surface or leave free-standing for quick reposition, these mounts are designed to support an 8″ temperature sensor tablet (not included). Once the stand is paired with a self-service, non-contact temperature screening tablet, it will alert individuals of heightened temperature status.

Click for full size image

Peerless-AV is also offering three new small-format, indoor Kiosks for public spaces. The first version of the Temperature Sensing Digital Signage Kiosk (THR-300) is integrated with a 22″ display, as well as non-touch, thermal sensing TempDefendTM Protection Basic Software from 22Miles. The second option of the Temperature Sensing Digital Signage Kiosk (THR-400) is integrated with a 21.5″ Mimo Monitors Display and digital signage software from Revel Digital, which provides detection within 3′ and temperature readings up to 18″. The third variation of the Temperature Sensing Digital Signage Kiosk (THR-500) comes with personal protection dispensers for refillable touch-free antibacterial foam dispenser, disposable gloves and facial tissues, and accommodates a 32″ display, FLIR temperature camera, as well as non-touch, thermal sensing TempDefendTM Protection Basic Software from 22Miles.

These small format, indoor kiosks feature a thermo-sensing system that leverages a combination of camera technology, facial and body temperature detection software, integrated sensors, and dynamic machine learning algorithms to aid in the prevention of viral spread, while also working as a dynamic digital signage solution when needed. The self-service, non-contact temperature screening system will alert individuals of heightened temperature status as they enter the premise, alleviating customer and staff concerns. It will also capture analytics that confirm operational compliance and Human Resource requirements.

The ongoing concern for public health has further emphasized the need for regulating the flow of foot traffic in public places. To aid businesses worldwide, in managing customer and employee access to keep everyone healthy and comply with new regulations, Peerless-AV has partnered with Navori Labs to introduce a new, completely integrated digital signage solution for occupancy control. The Occupancy Control Kiosk (THR-600) is integrated with a display, Navori Labs QL 2.2 Digital Signage Software, media player, and web camera. This indoor, portrait kiosk regulates foot traffic at each point of entry and detects if a visitor is wearing a mask, while also displaying dynamic digital messaging, such as rules, instructions, wait times, promotions, and other information.

While these standard kiosk solutions are available, Peerless-AV also offers customization options to create unique solutions that help businesses meet their specific requirements and margins. Peerless-AV kiosks are customizable in every way – from the choice of integrated technology to custom paint and vinyl wraps. Through offering the ability to adapt and equip businesses with a customized solution to address health concerns, Peerless-AV hopes that more businesses are able to operate safely.

Peerless-AV Introduces Health Protocol Solutions from Peerless-AV on Vimeo.

“Peerless-AV is committed to providing businesses with a variety of solutions to choose from that will allow them to communicate and implement proper health protocols to protect their employees and their visitors alike. It was also very important for us to develop a versatile product that can be repurposed into a dynamic digital signage device should temperature sensing no longer be required,” said Nick Belcore, Executive Vice President, Peerless-AV. “These new health protocol solutions are ideal for corporate, public transit, retailers, stadiums and beyond. Customers can expect these new offerings to meet a variety of needs with the same level of support you have come to expect from Peerless-AV.”

In addition to these new solutions, Peerless-AV has also been involved in several global projects designing health protocol solutions, such as the recently launched bundled Digital Signage Solutions from Peerless-AV, as well partnering with LG to provide businesses with bundled Health Protocol Solutions.

Please contact a Peerless-AV Sales Representative for more information: www.peerless-av.com/pages/sales-contacts

For more product detail information about the new solutions for public health preparedness and viral prevention, please visit: www.peerless-av.com/pages/health-protocol-solutions

About Peerless-AV

Driving Technology Through Innovation

For over 75 years, passion and innovation continue to drive Peerless-AV forward. We proudly design and manufacture the highest quality products, including outdoor displays and TVs, complete integrated kiosks, video wall mounting systems, professional carts and stands, and more. Whether a full-scale global deployment or custom project, Peerless-AV develops meaningful relationships and delivers world-class service. In partnership with Peerless-AV, you are trusting an award-winning team of experts who will support your business every step of the way. For more information, visit peerless-av.com.

More Peerless-AV News

Peerless-AV® Announces New 65” Xtreme™ High Bright Outdoor Display

Peerless-AV Announces Larger UltraView UHD Outdoor TV

TDSTOUCH introduces a contactless temperature measurement intelligent identification terminal

Most agree that the coronavirus pandemic will accelerate
mobile commerce and contactless approaches. In response to the global COVID-19 virus prevention and control,  TDS has developed a revolutionary technology, contactless temperature measurement intelligent identification terminal.

In many businesses, hospitals and retailers, temperature screening of employees and visitors is already necessary to stop the virus.

Temperature-sensing kiosks can help
prevent crises and optimize return to business as employees and guests return to work and entertainment venues.

Features

  • Available in 10.1 “and 15.6” widescreen sizes
  • Zero Bezel design, with an all-metal casing
  • RK3288 quad-core processor with primary frequency of 1.8gh
  • Two options — touch and non-touchscreen
  • Body infrared sensor light control to save power and energy
  • The temperature detector with detection distance <1 m and temperature tolerance ±0.3℃
  • Temperature display with support, warning of exceeding temperature
  • USB extension interface, supporting the extension IC card reader and RFID
  • Support version 7.1 and below of Android operating system
  • Support floor-to-ceiling and wall-mounted brackets

Please consult us for more information.
Website:www.ustdstouch.com
Email:info@tdstouch.com

Kiosk Returns – Doddle and KIOSK Provide self-service returns in retail stores

From Kiosk.com Jun2020

We all know that returns are an essential part of the consumer journey, yet they can cause retailers some serious trouble to process. For instance, in-store returns are a great way to recapture lost revenue from returns, but processing them at the checkout can cause longer lines, create more work for staff and extend wait times for customers who are trying to buy something.

Retailers learn how they may recapture lost revenue from returns

While 61% of Americans prefer to return goods in-store according to UPS research, those retailers who do offer in-store returns generally have not adapted specifically for this customer journey. Customers with a return transaction often have to wait in line with everyone else to sort their return out and after their handover, may wait up to 3 weeks for credit card refunds (where these are offered).

When making an in-store return, 70% purchase an additional item

return flow in-store

Alternatively, customers can book ahead using the digital portal, linked via the retailer website, and hosted by Doddle. In this return path, customers simply scan the code from the portal once they’re in store, and the label is automatically printed. Once they’ve applied the label and dropped the parcel into the hatch, they’re free to shop. When making an in-store return, 70% purchase an additional item compared to only 42% who make a new purchase while processing an online return.

Read the full article

Fever Detection Kiosk – Evoke Creative

Fever Detection Kiosk by Evoke Creative

Screen customers and staff at the point of entry using our contact free, automatic temperature check station by Evoke-Creative.

  • Face detection, can remind a user to wear a mask if not already
  • < 3 second detection rate using infrared technology
  • Accurate to within +/- 0.5 c
  • Clear call to action 15” screen
  • Totally autonomous and contact-free
  • Simple to deploy compact design
  • Can be custom branded for any organization

BENEFITS & OPTIONAL COMPONENTS

  • Proven hardware
  • Rear static advertisment
  • Easy to integrate
  • Front vinyl wrap
  • Touch free operation
  • Durable

 

Download our brochure

EV-Lite-Temperature Station spec sheet

 

WHY EVOKE? 

With over 25,000 kiosks installed across 60 countries, we are
one of the world’s leading kiosk manufacturers and have built
a strong reputation for delivering exceptional products
to some of the world’s largest brands. These include
McDonald’s, Google, Walmart, Mastercard and Tesco.

UK: +44(0) 151 334 3716
US: +1 864 313 7602
sales@evoke-creative.com
www.evoke-creative.com

Kiosk Webinars

With the pandemic and trade shows basically reduced to virtual tradeshows, webinars are one of the ways that companies continue to communicate.

Upcoming Kiosk Webinars

 

Back To Business – Customer Experience in a Post-Covid World

olea webinar

As businesses in all industries get ready to re-open, we’ll discuss the following:

  • Old Normal vs. New or No Normal
  • Common Themes Emerging with Contactless Experiences, Social Distancing and Technological Efficiencies
  • Customer Experience Expectations
  • Q&A

We invite you to join us for an open discussion with our panel:

Frank Olea–CEO, Olea Kiosks
Graig Fisher–Vice President, Vista Entertainment Solutions
Bruce Rasmussen–Director of Sales, Strategic Verticals Ingenico Group
and Moderator Daniel Olea–Account Executive, Olea Kiosks

Link To Register

 


Social Distancing in Telco Retail: From Home Delivery to Queuing and Self-Service

July 1st 2020, 4PM CET
Pyramid webinar
Link To Register

 


For more information visit the register links or contact us

 

What’s Going On With Facial Recognition?

From Design Smart City Jun-2020

Several developments in the Facial Recognition arena.  The big starting point is that IBM is ditching Facial Recognition.

In a letter to members of Congress, IBM CEO Arvind Krishna said the company would no longer make general-purpose facial recognition and analysis software, citing concerns about the technology’s use by law enforcement agencies. He clarified that IBM “firmly opposes” the use of facial recognition “for mass surveillance, racial profiling, violations of basic human rights and freedoms.” The letter also outlined various efforts the company would take in response to ongoing anti-police brutality demonstrations, such as endorsing a federal registry for police misconduct.

IBM wasn’t super specific in its announcement. However, a person familiar with the matter said that IBM will limit itself to the development of visual object detection and will no longer make APIs that could be used to power facial recognition available to outside or internal developers. The company would not comment further.

Meanwhile the next day (June 12) we have announcements from Amazon and Microsoft

From the Dive —

  • Amazon and Microsoft announced on Wednesday and Thursday, respectively, moratoria on police use of their facial recognition technology, amid a call for federal regulation of the controversial technology. Amazon’s moratorium is for one year, while Microsoft said its moratorium is indefinite until laws are in place.
  • In a short statement, Amazon said it would continue to make Rekognition available to groups like Thorn, the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Marinus Analytics to help the victims of human trafficking and reunite missing children with their families. Microsoft President Brad Smith said any national law should be “grounded in human rights.”

More Information on Facial Recognition in Self-Service

 

 

Post COVID Business Restructure – Opinion

The following is an editorial comment by Kiosk Industry editors on the modified current outlook for self-service in the post-COVID-19 world of customers and employees.

Self-Service (and Touchscreens) Set for Accelerated Growth

We spent an hour with Philadelphia Inquirer this morning.  The same one it turns out who wrote up the cash versus cashless policies set up in Philadelphia (and apparently mostly at the insistence of ATM lobby industry, kudos to ATMIA on that).
“I’m working on a story about the future of touchscreens in a post-pandemic world.”
Our main response points were:
  1. self-service interaction is going to jump even higher as person-to-person declines. It’s simple math.
  2. Privacy issues with credentialing and biometrics will rise in visibility. No more hotel mag card keys but a facial recognition camera built into the new door lock for example.  AntiTheft AI engines (recent Walmart screwup e.g. with its Digital Eye on checkouts scanning for theft – link)
  3. The majority of the “purchasing populace” has a very short attention span. Example might be the premature opening of states here in US with nine of those states now faced with big spikes – link to Washington Post
  4. Quarantine fatigue or “Screw it, I’ll do it” is getting closer and close to emerging.  Example premature opening of states….
  5. Majority of your multi-generational customers (teens and younger) have no fear and less confirmed bias (like old white guys like me…)
  6. In post-COVID — Retail and Hospitality and Transportation/etc must “reformat” their business platforms. They will invest in Technology, not people.

We also had a nice conversation with Brian Whitney of Appetize yesterday and got a rundown on current and future strategies of cloud-based POS provider such as Appetize. We highly recommend his webinar on Restaurants Rise last week which covered “How to enable touch-free guest experience for restaurants“.

The point we took away is that all of the avenues and techniques for customer interaction which are NOT primarily person-to-person are going to be increasing, dramatically.

Nice article on NRN with Panera Bread and Fish City Grill on how marketing is changing in the post-COVID-19 world. Article link

Making it transparent to the consumer —

“Up until now, no one wanted to know what was happening behind the curtain,” Greene-Wallace said. “Our team members were good about washing our hands, but now we put in a dining room timer that goes off every 20 minutes and everyone stops what they’re doing to wash their hands. Customers can see what’s happening live.”

Main KI Contact Form
This is xxxxx with the Philadelphia Inquirer. I’m working on a story about the future of touchscreens in a post-pandemic world. As you know, kiosks have been widely adopted at stores, banks, and airports because of their convenience and efficiency, but I suspect the high-touch surfaces will make some consumers leery, possibly forcing businesses to make changes. I’m reaching out to see if you or someone else from the kiosk manufacturing industry can talk to me today. I’m curious how your industry is handling this both in the short and long term. Is there a low-tech fix, such as nearby wipes for consumers to use? Or could bigger changes be on the way, perhaps voice or contactless technology? Any insight would be greatly appreciated. I’m speaking to banks, stores, and airports about the consumer-facing end of this, but I’d really like to get the manufacturing perspective too. Thanks, xxxxx
Related Links

Bill Payment Kiosks Outdoor – Case Study Cooling

Bill Payment Kiosks

Kiosk cooling:

TECA Model AHP-451XE Peltier coolers are protecting over a dozen customized bill-pay kiosks. This example illustrates the power of TECA’s smaller air conditioner models. With just over a 100 Watts of cooling power, the AHP-451XE is meeting the thermal requirements of this fairly large (over 4’ tall) kiosk. Housing heat sensitive equipment including computing core, printer, imager, and a 15” LCD touchscreen, this kiosk is exposed to high ambient temperatures as well.

TECA has extensive experience protecting kiosk components. Many of our air conditioners – whether for AC or DC input – are safety certified to UL/CSA standards and are CE marked. TECA builds our products in the USA. Kiosk end users will benefit from our informed design and manufacturing talents. Our low-turnover assembly team is dedicated and experienced. We consistently deliver quality products. Peltier cooling technology is long-lasting, reliable, and virtually maintenance-free. Please contact us today with our kiosk cooling questions! We look forward to hearing from you.

teca@thermoelectric.com
PH 773.342.4900

quarterly e-newsletter

NRF COVID Resources – Industry Partner Resource Headquarters

The Kiosk Manufacturer Association is pleased to announce our inclusion on the NRF COVID Industry Resource Partners Headquarters page.

From NRF : “The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically affecting businesses all over the world including the retail industry. To support retailers, NRF’s technology, research and consulting industry partners are providing free or discounted resources and guidance. This includes tools, strategic insights, products and services and more to help retailers navigate through the current environment.”

The below listing includes: webinars; research and consumer insights; free products and services; and discounted products and services.”

Touchless kiosks developed by Kiosk Innovations

First released on PRNewswire and below content as echoed on Yogonet. They included the YouTube videos embedded for the gesture nav and the foot nav which is a “nice touch”.  These technologies are truly a bit of a departure from the more conventional gesture technology usually presented. And this is the first occurrence of foot navigation that we have ever seen.  Kudos to the engineering team at Kiosk Innovations.  Propretary interface which connects into USB.  Windows support only.  Much like the Storm Interface accessibility devices and we didn’t mention accessibility but it is definitely a notable factor. Innovative things! — Editor

Touchless kiosks developed by Kiosk Innovations

Touchless kiosks developed by Kiosk Innovations
These devices use simple Up, Down, Forward, Backward, and Enter/Select keys for touch-free navigations.
UNITED STATES | 05/28/2020

Hand Gesture Navigation and Foot Controlled Navigation can be mounted on any existing or new kiosks with a USB connection. They can both be integrated at the same time, and the end-user has the ability to use either the foot pedal or the gesture module.

Kiosk Innovations has developed two No-Touch solutions that allow touch-free navigation to mitigate the spread of any virus — Hand Gesture Navigation and Foot Controlled Navigation.

The company said in a release Thursday that the development came after having studied the available Covid-19 kiosk safety options in the market, and come to the conclusion most available have shortcomings. “Voice, sanitizing wipes, AI conversations, speech recognition, mobile proxy and camera-based navigation to name some of them all have limitations in terms of effectiveness and usability,” the provider said.

Kiosk Innovations’ foot-controlled (Foot-Nav) and gesture-controlled (Gesture-Nav) can be mounted on any existing or new kiosks with a USB connection. These devices use simple Up, Down, Forward, Backward, and Enter/Select keys for navigations. They can both be integrated at the same time. The end-user has the ability to use either the foot pedal or the gesture module. The touch screen is still available for those who want to do it traditionally.

Rick Freeman, Senior Vice President of Sales at Kiosk Innovations commented: “We have evaluated every possible user ‘touchless’ interface available as well as preventative mitigation and after consulting with our customers we came to the overwhelming consensus that for navigation alternatives the most intuitive are gesture and foot navigation.  Users not only need trust the interface as ‘clean’ but the technology needs to be easily adopted.”

Kiosk Innovations also provides a full range of Antibacterial Kiosk solutions depending on the customers’ preference. The firm provides self-service innovative technologies with a company emphasis on safety, education, and communication. It is a major provider of custom transactional terminals for markets such as Bill Payment, Hotel Check-in, Casino/Gaming, and Amusement.

Request More Information

PSA Public Service Announcement – Sanitizer Kiosks

Before you go installing or reselling the new Digital Signage Sanitizer Kiosks be sure to verify that it’s UL certified. Ask for the certificates on the exact machine you are looking to purchase. Manufacturers have this information readily available if they have done the tests. Sanitizer is flammable. Faulty electronics, poor wiring etc… are all great sources of a flash-point. We’re a huge fan of all the innovation going on in my industry from around the world but, safety before profits.

Some other notes:

  • Reviewing most offerings the units were designed as wall mount.
  • Notice never anyone in the picture as a reference.  Because the height of applicator is at 29.2 inches so a 2 year old is at risk if walking.
  • Electronics are not UL or CSA approved.
  • Companies using these could be liable for multiple avenues for lawsuits.  Not to mention their insurance would not cover lawsuit problems.

Reference link on dangers of sanitizer kiosks from CBS News

There’s a hidden risk with keeping hand sanitizer in your car to help protect against COVID-19 and other illnesses, especially during the hot summer months. Flammable liquids and direct sunlight can make it explode, CBS Dallas warns.

“It’s flammable and it’s an irritant,” retired Dallas firefighter Sherrie Wilson told the station. “When it’s venting and if it’s venting in a small space like a car, and vapor is released, it can explode.”

 

Temperature Check Kiosks – Olea

Temperature Kiosks Olea Kiosks –  Delivering

Temperature checks on employees and visitors is becoming commonplace for many businesses, hospitals, grocery stores, retailers and a host of others. Temperature sensing kiosks can help stem a crisis and optimize a return to business as employees and guests return to work and entertainment venues.

Olea Temperature Sensing Kiosk from Craig Keefner on Vimeo.

Reference page on Olea Kiosks Website

olea-temperature-kiosks from Kiosk Manufacturer Association on Vimeo.

Benefits of Temperature Check Kiosks

The Temperature Sensing Kiosk provides a number of benefits to allow businesses to protect their most valued assets–their employees.

  • Reduce risk of access by infected persons*
  • Maintain a safe work/business environment
  • More hygienic than thermometers that require physical contact
  • Safer and more efficient than using a human resource to screen temperatures
  • Reduce stress and anxiety for employees and guests.

Prevention is the Key

There are many activities happening simultaneously to ensure a safe work environment.  The Temperature Sensing Kiosk reduces the risk of infection to your employees and costly and time-consuming contamination clean-up efforts.  Give employees and visitors the confidence to know you’re doing all you can do to protect them.

How It Works

The Temperature Sensing Kiosk is equipped with an infrared temperature sensor/detector and the system provides an alert if an individual is running a fever. The system uses an algorithm for fast detection temperature accuracy.

Protect Your Investment

Your people are your most valuable investment. To help stem the crisis and optimize a return to business, hospitals, grocery stores, and retailers and a host of other companies will look to temperature screening as employees report to work and venues open up again. This first layer of screening can curb the spread of virus as well as prevent costly and time-consuming contamination clean-up. This solution is equipped with an infrared temperature sensor/detector and the system provides an alert if an individual is running a fever.

  • Stop infection at the door
  • Maintain a safe work/business environment
  • More hygienic than thermometers that require physical contact
  • Safer and more efficient than using a human resource to screen temperatures
  • Avoid costly contamination clean-up
  • Reduce stress and anxiety for employees and guests

Specifications:

  • Uses an algorithm for object heat and fast detection temperature accuracy • +/- 0.5 degrees Celsius
  • Android Operating System and Software included
  • 1 second refresh rate
  • Scans people from 20 to 39 inches from kiosk

Olea Kiosks. Redefining Self-Service Technology.

For more information email Olea Kiosks or send contact form.

 

More Information

Frank Olea – I believe that as we venture back out into public places we’re all going to want to see what has been put in place to make us feel safe. Something visual and useful like hand sanitizer in the right places is a good start. Standing next to a bank of kiosks or mounted directly to the kiosk means I can use this machine without fear because I can immediately clean my finger afterward. Sometimes it’s the simple solutions.

Additional Temp Check Kiosk Links

Frost & Sullivan Recognizes Olea Kiosks – Outdoor Kiosk Design

Olea Showing New Healthcare Offerings at HIMSS

Vista Cinema and Veezi Approve Olea for Self-Service Ticketing Kiosks

Temperature Kiosk with Remote Services Frank Mayer & Associates, Inc.

Temperature Kiosk Frank Mayer

With more businesses looking to implement proper safety precautions while respecting employees’ privacy, we’re excited to offer a remote #kiosk option for #temperaturescreening. Learn more about the program at the link below.

In partnership with Agile Force Inc. and TES America, LLC, we’re proud to introduce a full-service solution to the growing demand for remote temperature screening #kiosks. Read more about the contactless option designed to offer minimal disruption and promote privacy and safety. https://bit.ly/3cXFzxX
#temperaturemonitoring #temperaturekiosks #covid19

When temperature screening is no longer a necessity, companies can continue to utilize the station and technology to monitor shift changes, assist employees with human resources needs, distribute PPE, interview job candidates, and more. “Three years ago, we developed a solution to help solve remote engagement challenges with employees,” says Michael Walsh, CEO of Agile Force, Inc. “Little did we know, we had built the perfect social distancing tool for all employers.”

The kiosks combine best-in-class technology components, including TES America touch technology, to provide a commercial-grade solution with a long lifecycle for the business marketplace. TES America General Manager Gene Halsey says, “We are pleased to be involved in such an important project when employers are looking for answers during this unusually challenging time.”

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. President Mike Mayer added, “By combining our core competencies, Agile Force, TES America, and Frank Mayer and Associates are going to market with more than just a temperature screening kiosk. We’re solving the problem of health screening while also improving operational efficiencies for companies and enabling a safer, more engaged workforce.”

For more information about the temperature check kiosks and employee engagement centers, visit https://www.frankmayer.com/temperature-screening-kiosk/.

Introducing the full-service solution to a growing demand for remote temperature screening.

Powered By

>LET’S TALK
Using remote engagement software and thermal imaging cameras on a contactless temperature screening kiosk, employee temperature checks can be easily monitored offsite with minimal disruption and an emphasis on privacy and safety.

Employee Engagement Technology

More than a temperature screening kiosk, remote technology and software empowers Human Resources departments and staffing agencies

  • Onsite Activities — Allow staff to monitor shift changes, greet new hires, conduct temperature checks, and connect employees with departments like HR, payroll, or telemedicine – all while saving the cost of staffing management on-site.
  • Remote Control
  • Hiring Features — Interview job candidates, collect universal digital applications, and onboard new talent at different site locations – from anywhere.
Remote onsite management outsourcing is completed remotely, providing important benefits:
  • eliminates personal contact
  • minimizes health risk to employees
  • conducted by non-healthcare professionals
  • maintains employee privacy.

For more information here is our press release
Agile Force – FMA press release-converted

You can request demo and more information here if you wish

For more information from Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.

Industry People – Reggie Medford joins Frank Mayer & Associates

Retail Marketing Psychology – Frank Mayer

Temperature Sensing Digital Signage Platform by Mimo Monitors

Stay Ahead of the Curve with Mimo Monitors’ Touch-Free Temperature-Taking Platform

The Temperature Sensing Digital Signage Platform by Mimo Monitors

Priced from $899. For configuration and pricing please contact us, call +1-855-937-6466, or email orders@mimomonitors.com

It’s more important than ever to stay ahead of the curve and ensure that your family, loved ones, and your business are safe. That’s why we’re pleased to introduce the groundbreaking Mimo Monitors touch-free temperature-taking platform with the revolutionary Revel Digital software, ensuring you have the most reliable and innovative technology at your disposal.

Including all the necessary components needed to protect businesses and communities, this enterprise-grade platform is reliable, customizable, and seamless to use. Designed specifically to be flexible, it contains an Award-Winning Mimo Monitors hardware display, Revel’s Digital’s CMS analytics and accurate temperature sensing software with a one-year license.

Available operating systems include Android and BrightSign, and bundle sizes from 7″ to 32″, the Mimo Monitors Temperature sensing platform was created with ultimate flexibility in mind. The software is built on top of digital signage software allowing for ultimate flexibility in messaging, instructions, and control, and, through its thorough analytics system, can be connected with existing databases to track personal temperatures daily and keep this on record. Remember – if identities and temperatures are tied to a person, you must secure their consent and follow all HIPAA regulations, etc.

The platform is also able to sync and work together for an all-encompassing picture. Ideal for entrances to grocery stores, assisted living facilities, office buildings, schools, or in taxis prior to riding, this kiosk uses advanced medical sensors to take a person’s temperature and ensure they are not putting others at risk. The kiosk must be located indoors and away from doors and HVAC systems for accurate results.

As a level-one device, the Mimo solution is ideal for pre-screening. For further evaluation, the solution should be used in combination with level-two, medical-grade devices and medical experts. It’s also important that, prior to escalating to a level-two device after an elevated reading, the person be allowed to acclimate to the area. FDA approval must also be secured in the event the device will be used for a medical purpose beyond simple pre-screening.
Seamless to set up and efficient to use, this groundbreaking, touch-free temperature platform can provide the peace of mind needed to ensure everyone’s safety.

Benefits:

  • Customizable, flexible, and comprehensive platform that can be utilized in a myriad of ways to fit the needs of every business. Examples include: providing a green or red light for someone to enter a building, with options to include syncing between locations, remote management and monitoring as well as a full analytics suite available.
  • Compact, durable, and reliable, for seamless install and intuitive use.
  • Integrates a state-of-the-art medical-grade temperature sensor. Runs on multiple hardware platforms including BrightSign and Android.
  • Available in wall mount, floor stand, standing kiosk, and in sizes 7-32” with varying complexity and customization of analytics to suit your needs.
  • Ideal for uses like grocery stores, assisted living facilities, office buildings, schools and more.
  • To simplify the temperature-taking process for those looking for a seamless and highly cost-effective solution, we also offer an entry level, non-CMS version that displays temperature and denotes a clear and easy-to-digest pass/fail temperature reading. This non-analytics solution ensures that everyone entering any public building is temperature-free and promoting safety
  • We also offer a touch-free, enterprise-grade kiosk bundle for manufacturers that includes a Mimo Monitors Android commercial display, BrightSign Built-in, or tablet, Revel’s Digital’s CMS analytics and accurate temperature sensing software with a one year license.

Analytics and Device Management

One key benefit with this system is the merging of signage with iOT devices, allowing for a safe working environment and keeping community members safe. temperature check analytics

Other benefits include:

  • Can notify you when the sensors are down
  • Collect and produce analytic reports
  • Scan ID badge and verify against employee database
  • Unlock doors to allow access
  • Send and email or text message
  • Provide real-time data
  • Provide a method of revenue generation / messaging
  • Networking multiple sites together
  • While sitting idle and not taking temperatures, the kiosk can display digital signage

Mimo Monitors’ new temperature-taking and touch-free platform, ideal for contactless entry, ensures everyone entering any building or public place is fever-free.

For more information on the platform hardware, please visit the detailed specifications for your size of interest

BrightSign Built-in

Android Tablets

Open Frame Displays

 

Request more information

KMA Welcomes Goldfinger Monitors – Touch Screen Monitors

Welcome – Goldfinger Touchscreen Monitors

KMA is pleased to welcome Goldfinger, provider of touch screen monitors and touch screen components. Goldfinger offers many customizable touch screen monitors in an array of sizes.

Goldfinger is the fastest growing monitor company in the United States designing and manufacturing non-touch and touch screen monitors with touch-screen capable on-screen menus boasting state-of-the-art technology and durability. We offer a full line of monitors that are built tougher with bolder colors and brighter screens. We design for markets such as point-of-sale applications including retail, casino gaming, vending, and arcade along with self-service commercial locations. At Goldfinger, we are geared to respond quickly to changes in the marketplace and the needs of you and your customers. We love challenges and welcome your feedback. We firmly believe we are only as successful as our customers.
animated goldfinger monitorLEARN MORE

Imagine a touch screen experience unlike any other. Experience vibrant lighting, high-definition imagery and brighter & bolder colors for the best Interactive experience. Infrared technology allows you to interact using a finger, a gloved hand, a pencil, or any other solid object. PCAP technology allows for a sleek look while still offering durability. Our tempered glass screen is virtually indestructible with no loss of clarity. Brighter and bolder video software with 900-2000 Nit panels available. Goldfinger monitors can run over 70,000 hours in a lifetime and with a return rate of less than 0.1% it’s no wonder why 300+ companies trust Goldfinger to deliver them over 1 million monitors.

Goldfinger offers a range of touchscreen monitors from 8″ to 86″, as well as custom monitors. Monitors offered in NonTouch, Infrared, and PCAP technologies.

To contact – visit our website Goldfinger or you can call at 843-996-0095 and/or email us here.

You can request more information here if you like

 

Contactless kiosk – temperature screening kiosks – Pyramid

Temperature Screening Kiosks Pyramid

Full article CNBC May 2020 — Sarah Whitten @SARAHWHIT10

KEY POINTS
  • IntraEdge and Pyramid have created a contactless kiosk that can check the temperature of up to 1,500 people per hour.
  • The kiosk utilizes Pyramid’s thermal imaging technology and has an error margin of less than one-tenth of a degree Fahrenheit.
  • No data is stored on the kiosk itself. Using IntraEdge’s Truyo Privacy Rights Platform the data is immediately encrypted and transferred to Truyo’s cloud.
Janus, a temperature-reading kiosk from IntraEdge and Pyramid, can be installed freestanding, using a wall mount or on a countertop.

As states reopen to the public during the coronavirus pandemic, retailers, hotels, movie theaters and sports stadiums are all looking for ways to keep patrons and staff safe.

Many of these businesses have been closed since mid-March to help stop the spread of the virus, and they are eager to rehire staff and welcome back customers and the billions of dollars they bring. But these businesses want to do so safely to protect employees and encourage customers to return.

One common strategy is to implement temperature checks at the front door. While not perfect, temperature checks can weed out the most obvious of Covid-19 cases. Still, for venues that typically have large crowds, trying to do mass temperature checks can be an overwhelming undertaking. In these situations, the handheld temperature readers aren’t a perfect solution.

On Thursday, IntraEdge and Pyramid Computer said they are working with Intel on a possible solution that leverages existing screeing and privacy technology that the companies manfuacture.

Read Full article CNBC May 2020

You Can Request More Information

Temperature Check – 22MILES Thermal Sensing FAQ

22MILES Thermal Sensing FAQ

22miles logo scrape FAQ  22MILES Thermal Sensing FAQ  Rev 3.1, 05/11/2020

What’s Thermal Sensing?

Thermal Sensing leverages a thermometer that measures temperature or a temperature gradient. A thermometer has a temperature sensor in which some change occurs with a change in temperature and converts this change into a numerical value.

What’s an Infrared Thermometer

An infrared thermometer is a non-contact thermometer that infers temperature from a portion of the thermal radiation, sometimes called black-body radiation emitted by the object being measured. By knowing the amount of infrared emitted by the item and its emissivity, the object’s temperature can often be determined within a specific range of its actual temperature. Infrared thermometers are a subset of devices known as “thermal radiation thermometers.”
Sometimes, especially near ambient temperatures, readings may be subject to error due to the reflection of radiation from a hotter body—even the person holding the instrument— rather than radiated by the object being measured, and to an incorrectly assumed emissivity.

What are we testing?

We are testing the skin temperature, not the fever inside the body. Please also note when visitors walk into a building from cold weather, their skin is below their body temperature, while it could be much higher if visitors just suntanned on the beach.

What are the technologies and difference?

There are mainly two types of infrared thermometer sensors available: thermopile and thermal cam.

Thermopile is an economical solution. It’s been used widely for forehead temperature guns for close distance testing. The thermopile sensor is sensitive to distance and typically requires short distance, like 1.5ft, for testing. This distance sometime could be too tight for public area use. Another limitation is that the sensor tests a tiny fraction of skin as it works like a laser beam – visitors cannot wear a hat or have to adjust their standing height to fit the face mask on the screen. The main benefit is a lower cost of the sensor, one fifth to one-tenth of a primary Thermal Cam sensor.
Thermal cam is a higher-end solution and usually support 5,000 testing points at a time, this equals to roughly 6ft-12ft wide area within 15ft. The higher resolutions, the larger sizes can be tested.

What sensors does 22M support?

22M doesn’t manufacture any thermal sensor. We aim to support as many brands of sensors as possible to help minimize global supply chain issues.

22M, after numerous research, by default ships FLIR sensors. FLIR Systems is the world’s largest commercial company specializing in the design and production of thermal imaging cameras, components, and imaging sensors. FLIR, based in Wilsonville, Oregon, is a component of the S&P 500 index with annual revenues in excess of $1.5 billion annually as of 2014.

22M also has finished support sensors from a few other vendors.

What’s the value of 22M Thermo Sensing Systems?

The first topic ever about Thermo Sensing is: what’s the accuracy. FLIR’s most sensors, from FLIR ONE to E95, has the same accuracy level at ±2°C (±3.6°F) for ambient temperature 15°C to 35°C (59°F to 95°F). That means 38°C (100.4°F) with ±2°C (±3.6°F) would cove most common body temperature, and we need something better. 22M team works on Machine Learning algorithms to train the system for calibration and reduce drifting.

22M, with 12-year digital signage and interactive software experience for all industries, has also developed several applications tailored for the US market. 22M has DoD and other security certifications to guarantee particular data has been well taken care of per each customer’s unique requirements.

Figure 1. Raw logs of our lab monitoring of black-body source in different temperature

figure 1 data

What’s the accuracy?

The accuracy depends on each sensor supported. As well as, How many training parameters have been taken into consideration in the delivery package. Without room temperature and humidity accessory, FLIR sensor can be ±0.3°C (±5.5°F) at 20°C (68°F) and 40% RH at 4ft distance. If your facility has a very different ambient environment, please let us know, and we will work on a unique training environment for you.

In a multi-user tracking scenario, we would recommend including a black-body source (temperature reference).

Can 22M further improve the accuracy?

Yes, 22M is working on delivering room temperature and humidity sensors. Once available, this would be added to the default delivery package. Existing customers can request an addon at a small cost.

Does 22M provide Calibration Feature in the software?

Yes, 22M provides a manual calibration interface in the software.

What’s the average body temperature?

Most people think an average body temperature is an oral temperature (by mouth) of 37°C (98.6°F). This is an average of normal body temperatures. Your normal temperature may be 0.6°C (1°F) or more above or below this. A forehead (temporal) scanner is usually 0.3°C (0.54°F) to 0.6°C(1.1°F) lower than an oral temperature.

Does 22M provide an option to adjust the temperature threshold in the software?

Yes, the system sets to 37.5°C (99.5°F) to ring the alarm. We do provide an interface to change this value to what you desire.

What is included?

22M has a core package of Thermo Cam + Software for any Windows Systems. Clients or partners have the option to purchase their kiosks, tablets, or all-in-one PCs or through 22M. 22M has a few hardware partners with verified systems that we recommend for this purpose. Android support will be ready soon.

Does the system have FCC?

Yes, all hardware parts/components used in the 22M default shipment has FCC.

Is the system FDA approved?

No. The device is for preliminary skin temperature screening but not for medical use. Please refer to the following link for details. https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/classify-your-medical-device/how-determine-if-your-product-medical-device

Tech Brief – Temperature Elevated & Body Temperature EBT

Tech Brief Thermal Imaging

The rush for temperature check and elevated body temperature is still going strong. Like any other technology though there are different solutions with different accuracy and different application extensions.  Instead of touch technology terms such as PCap or SAW we now talk in terms of thermopiles and thermal imaging cameras.  Pixels are still the determining factor ironically enough even between those two technologies. With touch technologies we have even entered new territory with “Touchless Touchscreens”. Reminds me of interactive digital signage.

Another great source of information on thermal sensing is FAQ by 22Miles. 22MILES Thermo Sensing FAQ-converted-compressed

Thermal Camera Imaging – Plain English

facial temperature check
Click for full size image

The advantage of thermal cameras — look at this purely from a physics and physiological point of view. Take the thermal image from a face below. The colors represent the temperature distribution across my face. Would you agree that the thermal landscape is rather complex? The spread of temperatures is quite dramatic.

If you now take a pyrometer with a single pixel and measure a 1 inch or 2 inch region of my face, you will measure the AVERAGE temperature of that region. Even if the accuracy of that device is +/- 1C it doesn’t matter. This has to do with optics. If we focus thermal radiation with different energy levels onto the same detector element, we end up with an AVERAGE. 

Mathematically, the average will be lower than the max. temperature. Hence, this is the largest source of error, using these sort of detectors. That is why a thermal camera with 320 x 240 detector elements (pixels) is far superior to any single element or 32×32 pixel sort of detector. It doesn’t matter who makes it. Simple physics!

The way these manufacturers test the accuracy of their sensors is to point them at a black body. That surface temperature of that black body (calibration source) is UNIFORM and at least as large as the measurement region of that detector. A human face is anything but uniform as you can see below. So looking at their accuracy specification for this application is pointless, as it ignores the spatial resolution requirement for accurately resolving the temperature variations of the human face. This is the same problem with using forehead thermometers. As these tend to also just have a single detector in them.

facial temperature
Click for full size image

Take the example. we took a small region from the face and zoom in. This would be one pixel of one of the detectors you sent to us. You can see the pixels of the thermal camera clearly measuring all temperatures present. The thermal camera would report 97.3F in that region.

If that is the pixel size of one of the low cost detectors – these temperatures would be averaged. (92.6+91.2+95.8+97.3)/4= 94.2F  A 3 degree error! In other words, the low resolution sensor would have missed that person.

Again – this has nothing to do with brand bias – it is Physics/Optics/Math related.

Thermal Camera Imaging Technical

Elevated Body Temperature Screening – Read this, before buying a Thermal Camera

Elevated body temperature screening. This article discusses six topics you need to know before buying a thermal camera. There are so many options out there, it can quickly can overwhelming. Especially when you have no background in using thermal cameras for elevated body temperature screening or “EBT”.

This “6 Things you need to know before buying a thermal camera for elevated body temperature screening” article and accompanying video is intended for readers that are in the research and decision making process. Which thermal camera screening solution is right for me?

I have witnessed about 30 new “solutions” and entire new companies enter the market, just in the past two month alone. There is so much misinformation out there and so many false claims, that I felt compelled to write this article and make this video. The COVID-19 crisis has brought out the best in people and unfortunately also the worst.

A lot of companies are currently investing significant sums of money into technology they do not understand the first thing about. A lot of vendors out there didn’t even know how a thermal camera worked two months ago and are now calling themselves experts.

Elevated body temperature screening (EBT) not only requires an in depth understanding about thermography, but also a solid understanding of physiological effects of the human body. In particular, how the body thermally regulates.

Visit our Youtube channel for more educational video content: https://www.youtube.com/user/movitherm

Some companies promote their solutions as “fever screening” cameras. This is a misleading statement, since no thermal camera has ever been cleared by the FDA for fever screening.

These cameras can merely detect a variation in skin surface temperature. My name is Markus Tarin, and I am the President & CEO of MoviTHERM – Advanced Thermography Solutions.

I have spent the past 20 years developing thermal imaging systems for industry and research. Never before have I seen such a frenzy and unethical business practices when it comes to thermal cameras being offered for elevated body temperature screening.

When I started to learn about thermal imaging technology, back in the 90s, it took a go six months to get a fundamental understanding about the infrared spectrum, heat radiation, conduction, convection, emissivity, reflectivity, transmissivity and all the other fancy physical effects that influence the accuracy of a thermographic measurement.

So I empathize with so many of you out there trying to make an “informed” purchase decision within a very short period of time. Many of you may not even have an engineering background, let alone the ability to interpret technical specifications of thermal cameras. Now add to this the complexity of human physiology and how the body’s thermoregulation may skew the results of an optical instrument used for temperature measurement.

The reality is that you won’t have enough time to properly understand enough about these subject matters to truly make an educated and sound decision. What you are left with, is often the marketing literature of the solution provider. And their whole purpose is to play into the panic and fear around this subject matter to sell you their solution.

I felt compelled to share my knowledge and help educate people on this topic. For that purpose, I have put together six topics and boiled them down to the essentials. Hopefully people will find some value in this. This article is not meant to be an exhaustive “training course” or white paper by any stretch of the imagination. Rather, it is meant to convey some basic concepts to separate the marketing hype from technical facts.

Topic# 1 – How does a Thermal Camera work?

A thermal camera captures the radiated infrared energy from the surface of a solid object. The captured energy is then mathematically converted to a temperature reading. The temperature reading of each pixel of the camera is then being associated with a color, representing a temperature.

The absolute accuracy of a thermal camera depends on many factors. Considering all factors (Emissivity, spatial resolution, detector and system noise, temperature drift etc.), the expected accuracy of these cameras is no better than ±2° Celsius or ±3.6 °Fahrenheit. It technically can’t be better, unless you are placing the thermal camera into a very tightly controlled thermal chamber under laboratory conditions.

This is due to the fact that the image detector in the camera, the lens and the electronics warm up and create a temperature drift. Without active temperature compensation, this drift is a large contributing factor to the achievable accuracy on these cameras. All the cameras that are being offered for elevated body temperature screening are based on microbolometer type detectors.

Micro-Bolometer Pixel

Micro-Bolometer Pixel

I have to get technical – sorry…
I have seen marketing literature lately, that claim a camera accuracy of +/- 0.5C without the use of an external black body i.e. calibrated temperature reference source. They back up the claim with the fact that the entire calibrated temperature range was optimized for human body temperature, rather than the typical 170C to 350C range of typical thermal cameras. It is true that using a smaller dynamic range potentially helps with accuracy. However, this also requires a higher degree of amplification. With amplification comes additional noise. If the detector has an NETD of 0.05k (50mK) at 30C. The best theoretical accuracy achievable is about 10 times NETD. So 0.05K x 10 = 0.5K or 0.5C, ignoring all other error sources. Typical dynamic ranges of microbolometer detectors require a 14bit analog to digital converter. So, in order to make use of the largely reduced dynamic range, one would have to amplify the signal from the detector. This will also amplify the detector noise and hence will affect the achievable accuracy negatively. None of this helps and none of this deals with the temperature drift problem.

Takeaway: Achieving an accuracy of 0.5C with a microbolometer detector based camera requires one of two things:

– Active cooling and temperature control of the lens, the detector and signal electronics, which none of these have OR
– Using a external temperature reference source (aka black body, that is stabilized to better than +/- 0.5C)

Topic# 2 – What can a Thermal Camera detect?

A thermal camera can only detect, measure and document the variations of skin surface temperatures.

It cannot detect or diagnose any of the following:

  • If somebody has a fever or not
  • If somebody is sick or healthy
  • If somebody has an infection of any kind
  • If somebody is contagious or not

A diagnostic decision can only be rendered by a healthcare professional, using other FDA approved methods (fever thermometer, blood test, viral tests etc.)

A thermal camera used for this application requires an FDA 510k clearance. With such a clearance, it can be used as an “adjunct” screening tool for skin surface temperature measurements. It shall never be used on its own to render any diagnostic decision.

Topic# 3 – How to properly measure elevated body temperature?

Thermal image of tear duct for elevated body temperature screening

  • Body temperature is correlated closest at the inner canthus/tear duct.
  • Measuring skin surface temperatures anywhere else in the face, will not work properly.
  • Eye-wear will obstruct the tear ducts and must be removed
  • Person should be standing still at a fixed distance to the camera
  • The inner canthus should be covered by a sufficient number of camera pixels to allow for an accurate measurement. (At a minimum 3 x 3 pixels, ideally more)

Topic# 4 – What camera pixel resolution do I need?

  • The tear duct area is about 5mm. We need at a minimum 3 pixels to cover that region for an accurate measurement.
  • 5mm / 3 pixels = 1.6mm/pixel
  • Using a thermal camera with 320 pixels, we can capture an image size of 320 pixels x 1.6mm/pixel = 512 mm [~ 20 inches]
  • Using a camera with 160-pixel resolution, we are left with an image size of ~10 inches.
  • Therefore, pointing a camera into a crowd to detect elevated body temperature will not work.
  • Assuming an image size of 5 feet, it would require a thermal camera with >12 Megapixels and these do not exist.

Topic# 5 – Reference black body vs. reference population

  • There are two legitimate measurement setups available for elevated body temperature measurement.
  • One uses an external black body reference to increase the accuracy of the measurement to about ±0.5° Celsius or better.

Reference black body for elevated body temperature screening

  • The other one uses a relative comparison of skin surface temperatures (baseline group)
  • Both setups are valid and require a manual correction from time to time to account for external factors that are impacting the thermoregulation of the human body.
  • Thermoregulation is the ability of the human body to keep its inner core temperature stable.
  • Core body temperature is: 36.4–37.1 °C (97.5–98.8 °F)
  • The body will either try to conserve energy or try to get rid of excess energy to maintain its ideal core temperature.
  • This results in increased or decreased skin surface temperatures, as the skin is the
    interface to the environment.

Topic# 6 – Which solution can I trust?

  • Be aware of “ambulance chasers”. More than 30 new solutions and companies have been created in the past two months.
  • Work only with reputable companies with a proven track record.
  • How long has the solution they are selling been on the market? Was it successfully used during previous pandemics, such as SARS & Swine Flu?
  • Be aware of false camera accuracy claims.
  • Be aware of fully automated systems.
  • Be aware of low-cost solutions.
  • Do not buy a solution that claims to be able to scan more than one person at a time. (Crowd scanning).
  • Be aware of false claims in marketing literature and websites.
    (i.e. Fever detection, avoids spreading infection, any diagnostic claims, keeping you safe etc.)
  • Not all thermal cameras and solutions are created equal!

So, what is an example of a trustworthy solution?

FLIR A320 Tempscreen for elevated body temperature screening

  • FLIR A320 Tempscreen
  • Originally developed for previous pandemics, such as SARS, Swine Flu etc.
  • Installed thousands of times around the world at airports, public buildings etc.
  • Proven solutiontried and tested.
  • FDA 510k Clearance for skin surface temperature measurements
  • Manufactured by the world’s largest manufacturer of thermal camera – FLIR Systems, Inc

For more information send us a request

More Information on Kiosk Industry

Contactless Touchscreen – No Touch Touchless Touchscreen

Temperature Kiosks

Antibacterial Kiosks – CDC on Contaminated Surfaces

Excerpt and noted on Yahoo News 5/19/2020. Thanks to Qwick Media & Olea Kiosks crowdsource reporting.

CDC: Coronavirus spreads through person-to-person contact – not via contaminated surfaces

Korin Miller WriterYahoo Life

 

Even before COVID-19 officially had a name, public health officials said the virus could be transmitted through infected respiratory droplets and by touching infected surfaces and then touching your nose, mouth, and possibly your eyes. So, people began snatching up face masks, wearing gloves, and ramping up hand hygiene to try to protect themselves.

While touching infected surfaces has always been part of the messaging on how the virus spreads, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently shifted its stance online. The CDC now says that COVID-19 spreads from person to person contact, and then lists touching infected surfaces under a section titled, “The virus does not spread easily in other ways.” The CDC adds: “This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about this virus.” The language is a subtle change from the organization’s warning in early March, when it wrote simply that it “may be possible” to spread the virus through contaminated surfaces.

The CDC, which did not respond to Yahoo Life’s request for comment, still recommends that you wash your hands often with soap and water, and routinely clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces to protect yourself and others from the virus.

Read full article Noted on Yahoo News 5/19/2020.

Antibacterial Kiosk Touchscreen Wipes Coatings

Temperature Kiosks

 

Sanitizer Kiosk

Sanitizer Kiosk with Display & Sanitizer Dispense

visit QwickMedia website or call

sanitizer kiosk

Your guests will appreciate the up-to-date building information along with free application of hand sanitizer boosting their confidence and assurance.  Designed with safety and security in mind.

Our sanitizer kiosk display models with sanitizers come in your choice of touchscreen or a non-touch digital-only version.  Showcase products services and promotions.

Available in screen sizes 22 inch and 32 inch.

  • Steel construction for rigors of public space use.
  • CMS software to manage content remotely or USB 
  • Custom branding available
  • Sanitizer sensor-activated 12V, no touch
  • 12-liter hand sanitizer capacity, billows brand
  • Screen Full HD 1080

sanitizer kiosk

CALL (604) 818-4909

SANITIZER KIOSK with Display and Hand Sanitizer

Laboratory studies from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show alcohol-based hand sanitizers made from 60% ethanol and 70% isopropyl alcohol are able to inactivate viruses genetically related to COVID-19.*

If you would like more information about LARGE CAPACITY HAND SANITIZERS and services we provide, please call (604) 818-4909 or contact us at info@qwickmedia.com.

*Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More Information

COVID-19 Offers and Products —
Temperature Check Kiosks —
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Temperature Kiosk – KMA

Temperature Check Kiosk

Having a digital signage temperature check kiosk to take a temperature verification check has seen a lot of interest recently.  Temperature verification kiosks could be one strategy for re-opening business and assuring customers of safety.

Disney Point of View

Bob Iger, CEO of Walt Disney Co., is pondering what such a future would look like. Perhaps, he suggests, it would look like testing the temperatures of all of the guests before they enter the theme parks.

“One of the things that we’re discussing already is that in order to return to some semblance of normal, people will have to feel comfortable that they’re safe,” Iger said in an interview with Barron’s. “Some of that could come in the form, ultimately, of a vaccine, but in the absence of that, it could come from basically, more scrutiny, more restrictions. Just as we now do bag checks for everybody that goes into our parks, it could be that at some point we add a component that takes people’s temperatures, as a for-instance.”

Twitter reaction to the idea of testing all visitors before they are allowed inside the parks was swift and decidedly negative.  Full article

Another industry looking to reassure is the airline travel industry.

“And when international aviation does start up again, there will be a need to protect and reassure passengers. Hand sanitizer will likely need to be available throughout the airport, including at boarding gates. “And there is evidence that temperature control at airports reassures passengers, even though it is only a partial solution,” says Powell. “Likewise, routinely wearing masks is contrary to WHO advice but passengers may prefer cabin crew to wear them initially.”  See article on reassuring passengers from iata.org


22Miles Temperature Taking Kiosk Solution

Orimary solution is the Thermal Sensing Solution that comes with extensive application options and supports Windows and Android.  Click here to see that information.

temperature taking kiosks
Click for full size image

22Miles

  • Available in 22”
  • Digital Signage content distribution through 22MILES platform
  • Body Temperature testing on the screen
  • Can be used at store entrance, hospital, corporate lobby, etc
  • Can integrate with guest check-in
  • Visit our site for more information

Olea Kiosks Temperature Sensing Kiosk

There are many activities happening simultaneously to ensure a safe work environment.  The Temperature Sensing Kiosk reduces the risk of infection to your employees and costly and time-consuming contamination clean-up efforts.  Give employees and visitors the confidence to know you’re doing all you can do to protect them.

temperature kiosk
Click for full size image

The Temperature Sensing Kiosk provides a number of benefits to allow businesses to protect their most valued assets–their employees.

  • Stop infection at the door
  • Maintain a safe work/business environment
  • More hygienic than thermometers that require physical contact
  • Safer and more efficient than using a human resource to screen temperatures
  • Reduce stress and anxiety for employees and guests.

Our Temperature Scanning Kiosk allows for efficient and accurate self-scanning of guests, patients, and employees as they enter your facility. Please contact us if you are interested in learning more or visit our webpage for temperature sensing kiosks.


Pyramid Health Kiosk for Temperature Verification

pyramid health screening kiosk
Click for full size

Provides fast temperature sensing before allowing access to buildings and venues.  Easy, safe deployment including office, healthcare, transportation, leisure and retail environments 

 Freiburg, Germany, May 18 2020 – Pyramid Computer GmbH today announced the worldwide availability of its new polytouch® 32 curve – access control kiosk which automatically measures human body temperature as part of authorized personnel and visitor access to buildings and public areas.  See product here on Pyramid website.

By streamlining the flow of people through the kiosk, quick but very accurate contactless checks can determine if an individual is running a fever and therefore potentially has the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) or possibly another virus or bacterial disease such as influenza. With the gradual easing of public lockdown measures and a return to work, the Pyramid polytouch® 32 curve kiosk helps businesses, institutions, public transportation and venue operators rapidly detect and reduce the potential spread of infection among employees, guests and visitors.


EvLite Temperature Check Kiosk

Evoke Temperature Check Kiosk Screen customers and staff at the point of entry using our contact free, automatic temperature check station.

  • Face detection, can remind a user to wear a mask if not already
  • < 3 second detection rate using infrared technology
  • Accurate to within +/- 0.50c
  • Clear call to action 15” screen
  • Totally autonomous and contact-free
  • Simple to deploy compact design
  • Can be custom branded for any organization
  • Send an email to Evoke Sales for more information
  • Visit Evoke Creative website

 


Insight Touch Temperature Screening

Insight Temperature Kiosk
Click for full size image

The non-contact temperature screening system is used to reopen the business and is more safety. Are you interested? Please feel free to email us: sales@insight-touch.com for more detail info.


Honeywell Thermal Imaging

The Honeywell ThermoRebellion temperature monitoring solution can be rapidly deployed at the entryway of a factory, airport, distribution center, stadium or other commercial buildings to quickly and efficiently identify whether personnel exhibit an elevated facial temperature. As individuals pass in front of a high-resolution, thermal imaging camera, their skin temperature is automatically detected within two seconds and displayed on an accompanying monitor.


Nanonation Temperature Kiosks

 Below are the links to Nanonation COVID-19 solutions, as well as a press release from our product launch.


Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. Temperature Kiosk

frank mayer temperature kiosk image
Click for full size image

The kiosks combine best-in-class technology components, including TES America touch technology, to provide a commercial-grade solution with a long lifecycle for the business marketplace. TES America General Manager Gene Halsey says, “We are pleased to be involved in such an important project when employers are looking for answers during this unusually challenging time.”

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. President Mike Mayer added, “By combining our core competencies, Agile Force, TES America, and Frank Mayer and Associates are going to market with more than just a temperature screening kiosk. We’re solving the problem of health screening while also improving operational efficiencies for companies and enabling a safer, more engaged workforce.”

In partnership with Agile Force Inc. and TES America, LLC, we’re proud to introduce a full-service solution to the growing demand for remote temperature screening #kiosks. Read more about the contactless option designed to offer minimal disruption and promote privacy and safety. https://bit.ly/3cXFzxX
#temperaturemonitoring #temperaturekiosks #covid19

Visit Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. for more info.


Request for More Information

If interested in temperature kiosks send us a note:

 

More Related Links

Contactless kiosk – temperature screening kiosks – Pyramid

Temperature Check – 22MILES Thermal Sensing FAQ

Tech Brief – Temperature Elevated & Body Temperature EBT

Touchless

 

Touchless

Touchless Kiosk – Gesture, IR, Voice, AI, Foot & Mobile

Having touchscreens or customer input stations which utilize no-touch touchscreen technology accelerated with the advent of COVID-19 pandemic.  How clean are the touchscreens is the usual question and what is involved in cleaning and maintaining touchscreen.

The added cost of a touch layer is a factor as well. Roughly a 22″ inch screen requires $220 in touch technology in order to make it a touchscreen.

Some of the options have been to reduce the area needed for touch control emulating a remote control onscreen for your screen. In large format displays this can save money.

Touchless Solutions – Companies

Olea Touchless Touchscreen Interaction

Here is an example of touchless touchscreen circa 2020 and Olea Kiosks.

From Frank Olea off LinkedIn — CONTACTLESS Touchscreen! We got them! I was super excited when we got these in our lab a few weeks ago. The system is very intuitive and does not require drivers. It’s plug and play in Windows and Android. The lighting turns on when your finger breaks the beams surface to give you an indication that the touch is active. There’s also an audio tone when you “press” a button. It works anywhere from .5” – 1” away from the glass surface. We have various sizes and can do portrait or landscape and add other features like privacy filter. Private message me or ask your Olea rep about it.

olea-contactless_progressive_video from Craig Keefner on Vimeo.

22MILES TOUCHLESS TOUCH…. JUST SPEAK AND GO

Create a fully interactive touch-free user experience through 22MILES’ Voice Activation/Recognition & Control. A component of the Digital Signage Solution Publisher Pro.AIoT, no matter the kiosk, location, or signage application, COVID-Proof the experience for users with a technology that is becoming the new standard.

  • Users Experience FASTER more EFFICIENT Interactions and Transactions
  • Find, filter and discover information, navigation, & more through voice
  • Eliminate the tedious tasks of searching through pages and pages of items & information…. JUST SPEAK AND GO
  • More information

KioWare Mobile Controller

This is a software feature solution offered by KioWare. Windows or Android. KioWare also offers Maintenance Notification for Users so they can see “Last Cleaned” cycle.

KioWare innovations for clean touchscreens and the User Monitored Maintenance Cycle

Ed Note: Using the kiosk as the “fulcrum” or proxy is not a new idea but it is coming of age with the current situation.  These new functions allow users to use their mobile phones as the proxy touchscreen. Statistically their mobile phone is a hotbed for bacteria but this method isolates users from contaminating the usually very clean touchscreen. People without mobile phones have cleaner fingers.  Kind of an odd situation of juxtaposable factors.

More information

Kiosk Innovations Camera and Gesture

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Gesture-Nav is an easy to use sensor based hand gesture navigation tool. It reliably senses 5 dierent directional gestures including Up, Down, Right, Left, and Enter

The Intel RealSense Camera and several software solutions around this exist. Typically requires or uses RealSense.  More information

Kiosk Innovations – Foot Controlled Navigation

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Foot-Nav is an easy to use, easy to understand, and very reliable navigation tool. Foot-Nav allows users to use foot controls rather than touch to navigate through a user interface using the same controls as Gesture-Nav.

KIOSK Information Systems AI or Artificial Intelligence

Meanwhile KIOSK (KIS) has teamed up Valyant on conversational AI

Conversational AI Kiosk – Valyant AI & KIOSK Information Systems Enable Contactless Conversational AI

Pyramid Labs – Touchless Demo

Josef Schneider
Chief Executive Officer at Pyramid Computer GmbH

What can you play with on a Monday morning in Pyramid Computer GmbH´s lab? Contactless interaction with Ultraleap for sure is fun. Will the world ever see it in massive kiosk rollout? Who knows, but we would be ready.
BTW great to be back in the lab. I missed playing on these gadgets a lot in the home office.

Pyramid Touchless Demo from Kiosk Manufacturer Association on Vimeo.


Touchless Solutions – Technologies

Configuring IR from Zytronic

Our pcap controllers/sensors can be set up by any user, with sufficiently high levels of sensitivity that they will detect the approach of a finger a few mm from the surface of the glass.

The issue that all non-touch touchscreens are likely to face is the susceptibility to ‘false touches’ as unless the user’s finger is pretty perpendicular to the screen, there is a risk that a knuckle/palm may activate other areas of the touchscreen (or in the case of an IR/optical touchscreen, also inanimate objects such as a shirt sleeve). The palm rejection algorithms within our controllers’ firmware will help, but I suspect that by cranking up the touch sensitivity to such levels they’d be fighting a losing battle.

The software content/GUI will also need to be carefully designed, with larger than normal keys and wide ‘guard bands’ around the keys, again, to minimise accidentally activating surrounding keys.

NFC Touchscreens

NFC means near field communications and is a short range form of wireless technology that lets you exchange data with other NFC enabled devices.  This typically involves an NFC chip and card.   NFC works within a radius of 10 centimetres making it an ideal method for sending data securely.

An example of use could be a teacher using an NFC card to login to a touchscreen with an NFC reader which would then automatically log them in to their own files and folders on the local network.

Another example is a customer using an NFC enabled mobile phone, tapping an NFC reader on a touchscreen kiosk to checkout and pay for their order.

In both examples, NFC is a great way to provide speed and convenience in busy environments and negating the need to input sensitive data on-screen. Example Link

Optical Sensor Touchless

Here is June 2019 release

SANTA CLARA, CaliforniaJune 26, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Neonode Inc., (NASDAQ: NEON), the optical sensing technology company, today announced that its zForce® Touch Solutions are now optimized for reducing pathogen transmission in hospitals and other public spaces, by enabling contact-free interaction with graphical user interface (GUIs).

Transmission of health care-associated pathogens that have been shed onto touchscreens and button panels such as elevator buttons, vending machines, information boards, and electronic menus in fast food restaurants create well-documented public health risks. Evidence supporting these risks is provided by the NIH [1]. Neonode zForce Touch Solutions enable contactless interaction with touchscreens and button panels to mitigate these risks.

A zForce Touch sensor mounted along one edge of a display provides an interaction area positioned a desired distance above the display surface as illustrated in Figure 1, below. By making the interaction area hover above the display surface, users experience touch interaction without actually coming in contact with the display, reducing the risks of shedding and receiving health care-associated pathogens through contact with the display.

A zForce Touch sensor can also be mounted beneath a panel of buttons, such as an elevator panel, to enable riders to select their floor without touching the buttons.

“The risk of contamination in hospitals and public areas is of paramount concern to facilities, customers and designers of displays and other interactive devices. Providing a safety-conscious solution without compromising performance and the user experience is the driving force behind Contactless Touch, and we believe our customers will be as excited as we are about this innovative application,” states Carl Bergendal, Executive VP Sales and Engineering at Neonode.

For more information please see “Contactless Touch- a safer method of interaction” [2] at neonode.com.

Hospitality Technology

Elevators go touchless here

Voice Control

Controlling an interface via Voice is getting better. Multiple software companies provide this now. Noisy places can require more expensive noise cancellation array microphones

Proxy Mobile

This is a software feature solution offered by KioWare. Windows or Android. KioWare also offers Maintenance Notification for Users so they can see “Last Cleaned” cycle.

Camera and Gesture

Gesture-Nav

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Gesture-Nav is an easy to use sensor based hand gesture navigation tool. It reliably senses 5 dierent directional gestures including Up, Down, Right, Left, and Enter

The Intel RealSense Camera and several software solutions around this exist. Typically requires or uses RealSense.  More information

Pyramid Labs – Touchless Gesture Demo

Josef Schneider
Chief Executive Officer at Pyramid Computer GmbH

What can you play with on a Monday morning in Pyramid Computer GmbH´s lab? Contactless interaction with Ultraleap for sure is fun. Will the world ever see it in massive kiosk rollout? Who knows, but we would be ready.
BTW great to be back in the lab. I missed playing on these gadgets a lot in the home office.

Pyramid Touchless Demo from Kiosk Manufacturer Association on Vimeo.

Foot Controlled Navigation

Just released by Kiosk Innovations: Foot-Nav is an easy to use, easy to understand, and very reliable navigation tool. Foot-Nav allows users to use foot controls rather than touch to navigate through a user interface using the same controls as Gesture-Nav.

AI or Artificial Intelligence

Meanwhile KIOSK (KIS) has teamed up Valyant on conversational AI

Conversational AI Kiosk – Valyant AI & KIOSK Information Systems Enable Contactless Conversational AI

Camera Intel RealSense

The Intel RealSense camera is getting many more integrations and include Gesture and Facial Recognition.

There are three different versions of the camera all tailored to specific situations:

  1.  Coded Light for depth and objects [SR300]
  2. Stereo used for facial recognition primarily [400 family]
  3. Lidar version  [515]

The F400 and D400 are most commonly used in the public space. Some interesting examples are:

  1. Teleidoscope Skeletal tracking
  2. Gestoos gesture
  3. Eyeware

All of these and more are listed on Intel RealSense website

There are more videos of RealSense and Skeletal Tracking on YouTube

Background on Contactless

Article by Richard Berglind, Sr. with Neonode

Smartphones and other portable products have made touch the human machine interface (HMI) of choice for many other products. Touch sensing is easy to implement, easy to use, reliable and cost-effective. However, there are many applications and situations where physically touching a device is not desired and, in fact, in some cases must be avoided. Before discussing a solution to these more restrictive applications, a little touch sensing background is in order.

A touchy topic

According to a recent market report, there is a growing need for touch sensing [1]. The report projects the global touch sensors market will reach approximately USD 8.4 billion by 2023, growing at 12.8% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) over the forecast period 2018–2023. Typical touch sensing technologies include: resistive, capacitive, surface acoustic wave (SAW), infrared (IR), optical imaging and more recently acoustic pulse recognition (APR). In their most common implementation, these approaches all require actual contact with the surface. However, applications exist that do not want or must avoid physical contact and necessitate a more sophisticated sensing approach.

One possibility would be using a time-of-flight technology to identify mid-air interactions above a touchscreen [2]. Time-of-flight is a ranging technique that resolves the distance between the sensor and an object by measuring the time it takes for light to travel to an object and back to the sensor. The accuracy is on the order of 1 cm, which makes it unsuitable for touch interaction purposes. Improving the accuracy would generally mean a slower frame rate. Furthermore, this kind of sensor requires calibration and is sensitive to changes in temperature.

Another alternative is infrared technology. Traditional infrared touch requires a frame surrounding the screen with emitters on two adjacent sides and receivers on the opposing sides. The touch interactive area is raised from the screen by simply raising the frame around the screen. However, the resulting rim around the screen would not only be difficult to incorporate aesthetically in a device, it would also make the screen difficult to clean, thereby defeating one of the purposes for its usage.

Read full Article by Richard Berglind, Sr. with Neonode

Some more information

From Intuiface: “Touchscreen Guidance in a (Post) Confinement World”, located here: https://www.intuiface.com/blog/touchscreen-guidance-for-a-post-confinement-world

Includes a reference to the how-to guide about an Intuiface-based experience illustrating how to incorporate touch alternatives in an interactive kiosk.

Elevators

Contactless Elevators & Kiosks, covers the Neonode Sensor Module and how our patented Optical Reflexive Technology provides a quick and inexpensive solution to turning traditional controls and displays into contactless, interactive devices. Ideal for new devices and to retrofit old ones, it is a practical solution to combating the spread of pathogens and other contaminants. Neonode evaluation modules and products are available today from Neonode and their distributor, DigiKey.
 
Holographic Elevators & Kiosks demonstrates how the Neonode Sensor Module and the ASKA3D Plate, combined with a display,  and some creative engineering can turn any elevator control panel or kiosk display into an interactive holograph. It is a real upscale approach to combating the spread of pathogens and contaminants. We are currently working around-the -clock on prototypes and working models with our manufacturing partner in Arizona will be available for your evaluation in the next 30 days from Convergence Sales.

Switching to Holographic and Other Contactless Touch
Solutions for Safer, Germ-free Interaction
We encourage you and your customers to join us Wednesday, June 24  at 0900 PST or this ground-breaking webinar on designing and manufacturing safe, interactive displays, presented by Neonode, the industry leader in Optical Reflective Technology.

Registration opens May 15 at: Neonode.com

Interested in More information?

Kiosk Manufacturer