Tag Archives: accessibility

Kiosk Accessibility Patient Kiosks

Read full article at Paciello Group March 2020

Healthcare kiosks are, now more than ever, a valuable tool for serving more patients without the need for up close staff interaction. They can be used for checking in patients and gathering symptom information for efficient triage purposes. They can also be used to measure patient blood pressure or heart rate, temperature, and other diagnostic information. Moreover, healthcare kiosks are also helpful for educating patients, collecting health insurance information, and scheduling future services.

Making a healthcare kiosk accessible not only improves patient care, but is required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities regarding public accommodations and the court has defined public accommodation to include (in title III) service establishments including healthcare facilities.

Creating an accessible healthcare kiosk

Disabilities, according to the ADA, can be physical (motor skills), cognitive (intellectual), low to no vision, low to no hearing, and more. But before addressing software accessibility, the first step to creating an accessible healthcare kiosk should be to make the kiosk physically accessible. The ability to access the kiosk by users in a wheelchair is required by the ADA.  It outlines specific compliance guidelines like the height of operable parts, the viewing angle, and the approach area for accessing the kiosk — which must also be accessible via a wheelchair. The approach area requires a clear path without stairs, uneven flooring, or objects to obstruct access.

Once physical accessibility has been established, turn your attention to another an equally important component: software. The kiosk application must also be accessible for use by someone who is blind or has low vision. The kiosk needs to have a screen reader, such as JAWS® for kiosk to turn text to speech. Some examples of accessible kiosks can be found in this video.

Touchscreens may be difficult for people with disabilities, so an external input/navigation device is also useful to allow users to engage with a kiosk without using a touchscreen.  The kiosk application must be developed to ensure it can be easily navigated and understood when read through a screen reader. WCAG 2.1 AA standards are application and website guidelines for accessibility. Following those guidelines with a healthcare check-in app, for instance, will make it easier for a blind or low vision user to understand and navigate the kiosk app. Learn more about selecting the right input device for your accessible kiosk.

Some things to consider when planning your accessible healthcare kiosk

  1. What application will you be using? Is it already accessible? If yes, can you improve usability for kiosk users?
  2. Is the kiosk hardware ADA compliant for height and reach specifications?
  3. Does the kiosk include an input device that has an audio jack? Oftentimes, there is no effect on audio jacks built in audio jacks when headphones are inserted. Using an input device that includes an audio jack will allow JAWS to turn off and on based on the presence of the headphones.
  4. Are you providing all information in a way that is accessible to all users, including those who are deaf or hard of hearing, and those who are blind or who have low vision? That includes any PDFs that are being read on the screen, videos in need of captioning, and document signing for HIPAA compliance.
  5. Are you protecting user privacy at every turn?

Read full article at Paciello Group March 2020

Press Release – Kiosk Manufacturer Association (KMA) Announces New Accessibility Committee Chairpersons

From PRNewswire March 2020

WESTMINSTER, Colo.March 4, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Kiosk Manufacturer Association aka KMA announces our new ADA and Accessibility Chairpersons.  Serving as co-chairpersons for our committee is Randy Amundson of Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. and Mr. Peter Jarvis of Storm Interface.  Randy is one of our founding chairpersons and is continuing in his support of KMA and ADA. Peter is a charter sponsor of the Accessibility Committee and now helps lead the way for the KMA.

From Randy Amundson, “Peter Jarvis and I continue to work closely in finalizing the Kiosk Accessibility Code of Practice (CoP). We feel that the CoP will be a useful tool that kiosk manufacturers and their clients can use to ensure that their kiosks are accessible to the widest population of people with some form of disability possible. Peter and I are also working on developing an independent standard that can be used by nationally recognized testing labs in order to certify a kiosk as being ADA compliant”.

Peter Jarvis adds, “First, let me thank the committee’s previous Co-Chair Laura Miller for her work in raising awareness of accessibility issues within the kiosk industry. Laura continues to make an outstanding contribution to the work of the KMA Accessibility Committee but has now stepped into a role dedicated to kiosk accessibility at Vispero. Her commitment, to ensure equality in access to information, services and products, continues to influence the committee’s objectives. As the new Co-Chair (serving the KMA’s European members) I hope to continue the initiatives of the committee and look forward to working with the committee’s US resident Chairperson Randy Amundson.”

We very much thank Laura Boniello Miller with Vispero our founding co-chairperson for her contributions, support and effort over the last two years.

Visit with the KMA at the upcoming CSUN conference as well as at MURTEC. In May we will be exhibiting at the National Restaurant Show.

Current KMA News

KMA member news

If your company, organization, association, local, city, state or federal agency would like to participate at some level with the KMA either with ADA or with EMV, please contact [email protected] or call 720-324-1837

Thanks for the generous financial support of our GOLD sponsors Olea Kiosks | KioWare | Nanonation | Pyramid | Frank Mayer | Vispero | Zebra  | ZIVELO

SOURCE Kiosk Manufacturer Association

Related Links

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Disabled Access – How Self-Service Kiosks Can Help Hotels, Restaurants Better Serve the Disabled

Self-Service Kiosks for Hotels, Restaurants

Article on Hospitality Tech by Vispero Feb 2020

By Laura Boniello Miller, Corporate Business Development Manager for the JAWS Kiosk program at Vispero, parent company of The Paciello Group – 02/26/2020

People with disabilities travel and dine out just like everyone else. Research conducted by the Open Doors Organization in 2015 found that “more than 26 million adults with disabilities traveled for pleasure and/or business, taking 73 million trips.” This spending has a significant impact on the travel industry, but sometimes the technology employed by hotels and restaurants is not accommodating to people with disabilities. This offers hospitality an excellent opportunity to employ self-service technology that will improve their disabled guest’s experience and capture more of their spending power with accommodations and services that support this group.

Read full article

Jaws Kiosk – Vispero Storm Collaborate on Accessible Kiosk Solution

 

Gold Sponsor – Vispero – ADA Accessibility Software Consultant

Encoded Tags – Wayfinding technology at Union Station

From The Source — thanks to Ross of Qwick Media for pointing this out!  Great post on assistive navigation for the blind using their mobile phones as intelligent cameras basically.


This post was written by Doreen Morrissey of Metro’s Office of Extraordinary Innovation and Armando Roman of Metro’s Office of Civil Rights.

Navigating through Union Station can prove challenging to even the most resourceful traveler, let alone somebody who is blind or visually impaired. While sighted travelers rely on signage and visual cues, blind and partially sighted people often seek tactile pathways to guide them. Given that installing tactile pathways at Union Station’s is challenging due to the historic landmark status of the station, Metro was open to alternative wayfinding solutions.

Last year, NaviLens submitted an unsolicited proposal to test an innovative, audio wayfinding technology—via Metro’s Unsolicited Proposal (UP) process. The UP process unlocks innovation by allowing outside parties to submit concepts to Metro. Review teams from across the agency evaluate the proposal, and if they determine there is financial and/or technical merit, the proposal moves forward. The UP process often leads to small scale pilots or proofs of concept so Metro can test concepts and emerging technologies. In this case, OEI and the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) reviewed the NaviLens technology and decided the proposal merited a proof of concept.

NaviLens was developed through a partnership between Mobile Vision Research Lab at the University of Alicante in Spain and the Spanish startup Neosistic. The technology consists of a set of colored pixelated tags (similar to QR codes) and an accompanying smartphone app. A user’s smartphone camera scans the surroundings for tags while the app recites the tag’s stored information. Each tag is strategically placed and individually programmed with wayfinding information including distance and direction to platforms, transit arrival and departure information, and ticket kiosks and restroom locations. The technology is powerful—a five-inch tag can be read from up to 39 feet away, in a 30th of a second, while the camera is in motion, and without even focusing.

This past October, Metro began testing NaviLens in Union Station. Tags were placed throughout Union Station, creating audio pathways to the B (Red), D (Purple), and L (Gold) Line platforms, Amtrak and Metrolink platforms, and Patsaouras Bus Plaza, and identifying ticket vending machines, fare gates, elevators, and emergency telephones. The pilot team included multiple Metro departments and other partners-  OEI, OCR, Metro’s Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC), Metro’s General Services, Morlin Property Management, Amalgamated Transit Union and the British Royal National Institute of Blind People. Throughout the pilot, NaviLens has been praised by blind and visually impaired test users. “I would feel more comfortable traveling by myself if this was available everywhere” and “This feels similar to what sighted people can do, being able to see signage” were some of the comments Metro received from the test group.

The NaviLens technology is gaining traction. It is currently deployed at bus stops and metro stations of the Barcelona and Madrid transit systems, has been endorsed by the Britain’s Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), and was recently studied as part of NYCMTA Accessible Station Lab pilot.

This isn’t the first wayfinding technology for blind and visually impaired people that Metro has piloted. Last spring, OCR conducted a pilot with Wayfindr, an audio navigation technology which pairs Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons with a smartphone app. As assistive technologies continue to evolve, Metro welcomes the development of aids that improve the autonomy of blind and visually impaired travelers in Union Station.

Want to explore yourself? Download the free NaviLens app and give it a try. We’d love to hear what you think.

MORE ABOUT NAVILENS

Where is NaviLens

Metropolitan Transportation Authority
(New York Metro)

NaviLens code marker at Jay St platform NaviLens code marker at Jay St platform

In this station, over 100 NaviLens codes:
(1) Help the visually-impaired users to be more independent in unknow spaces,

(2) Guide all users indoors through virtual arrows in a very innovative Augmented Reality (AR) experience, without GPS or Bluetooth,

(3) Offer real-time train arrivals information scanning any NaviLens code,

(4) And all of these features in 24 languages, breaking language barriers of all subway users.

It’s a revolution for indoor navigation where it’s not possible to use GPS or other computer-vision methods.

NaviLens code at Jay St MetroTech Station entrance. NaviLens code at Jay St MetroTech Station entrance.
Audible information for visually-impaired users scanning the code far away. Audible information for visually-impaired users scanning the code far away.
Augmented reality technology based on proprietary computer vision technology. Augmented reality technology based on proprietary computer vision technology.
A 10 inches NaviLens code can be read up to 60 feet away in 0.03 seconds, covering 160° degrees. A 10 inches NaviLens code can be read up to 60 feet away in 0.03 seconds, covering 160° degrees.

Two Apps Available to interact with this new technology:

The NaviLens App helps visually-impaired users, who can scan the codes without needing to know exactly where they are, offering the same information as the signage very accurately.

The NaviLens GO App provides in-station navigation, trip planning information, train arrivals and service status information to help sighted users navigate the station and the system.

You can check by yourself how well the technology works, pointing your phone towards the photos of this email using any NaviLens Apps.

Real-time information scanning the code far away.

Real-time information scanning the code far away.

The code can be printed in any material, like vinyl and can be placed very high. The code can be scanned by a mobile phone up 80° degrees (Vertically &  horizontally). The code can be printed in any material, like vinyl and can be placed very high. The code can be scanned by a mobile phone up 80° degrees (Vertically & horizontally).
EThe code is very easy to implement at any space: As easy as emplacement the code over current signage. The code is very easy to implement at any space: As easy as emplacement the code over current signage.

AudioEye and Duda Launch First Digital Accessibility Partnership for Large-Scale CMS

Partnership enables more than 500,000 website customers to easily and affordably achieve legal compliance for digital accessibility

TUCSON, Ariz., January 21, 2020 — AudioEye, Inc. (NASDAQ: AEYE), an industry-leading software solution delivering website accessibility compliance to businesses of all sizes, has announced a partnership with Duda, the leading web design platform for companies that offer web design services to small businesses.

WCAG Conformance

With this partnership, AudioEye is now one of five site-enhancing tools, and the only digital accessibility solution, integrated into the newly launched Duda App Store. This native integration now makes it possible for the more than 6,000 digital agencies and solutions providers to create legally compliant, fully accessible websites for hundreds of thousands of customers that help ensure barrier-free access for everyone, regardless of their individual abilities. Trusted by some of the largest and most influential businesses and organizations in the world, AudioEye provides an always-on testing, remediation, and monitoring solution that continually improves conformance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

“By enabling any website on the Duda platform to quickly turn on AudioEye with a click of a button, Duda has elevated the importance of digital inclusion with their customers, placing website accessibility on a level playing field with other essential and familiar website solutions for businesses such as SEO, CRM, SMS marketing, and several other fully integrated tools. Given their target customer base, this is the ideal positioning for the AudioEye solution,” said AudioEye Chief Strategy Officer and Co-Founder Sean Bradley. “This partnership represents a tremendous step forward for AudioEye in its mission to eradicate all barriers to digital access, and we are honored to partner with like-minded companies like Duda who also prioritize digital inclusion.”

Accessibility SaaS On-Demand

“We’re continuously innovating our platform to ensure we provide our digital agency and SaaS  customers with the tools needed to create the most modern, feature-rich, responsive websites available. This includes sites that are accessible to individuals of all abilities, which is why we are proud to now offer AudioEye’s industry-leading solution,” said Duda CEO Itai Sadan.

According to a recent Duda survey, more than 60-percent of clients have asked about web accessibility in the past year, with legal compliance being the most prominent motivator. In the United States, digital accessibility-related lawsuits have increased significantly over the past five years, with more than 2,000 lawsuits filed in federal court in 2018 and 2019, consecutively. This trend shows no sign of slowing in 2020. Overwhelmingly, courts are siding with accessibility. Recently, the Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal from the international pizza restaurant chain, Domino’s, upholding a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Decision in favor of accessibility. Internationally, more and more governments continue to establish or reinforce their own accessibility laws, which most commonly harmonize with WCAG. With AudioEye on a website, businesses significantly reduce their risk of a costly, time-consuming digital accessibility-related lawsuit.

AudioEye Pro and Managed are now available on the Duda App Store:

  • AudioEye Pro: best for freelancers who want to harness the power of AudioEye to manage website accessibility on their own using AudioEye’s developer tools. AudioEye Pro couples machine-learning automation with free developer tools. AudioEye’s always-on technology identifies WCAG errors, fixing some of the most common issues in real-time, while developer tools assist site owners in fixing remaining issues. AudioEye Pro includes scanning and monitoring and access to digital accessibility training and customer-only webinars. Pro also provides customers an Accessibility Statement, showing site visitors a commitment to digital accessibility, as well as a 24/7 Help Desk to report any accessibility issues encountered.
  • AudioEye Managed: ideal for agencies managing multiple websites who prefer to rely on AudioEye to ensure accessibility standards are met. AudioEye Managed provides a fully managed, comprehensive, speed-to-compliance digital accessibility solution. Managed enhances patented machine-learning technology with manual testing and engineering to deliver to site-specific remediations. Managed builds on the benefits of Pro adding the AudioEye Trusted Certification, verifying a site’s ongoing legal compliance with official documentation to assist in responding to any accessibility complaints or legal threats.

Both Pro and Managed customers also receive the AudioEye Accessibility Toolbar, which includes a set of personalization tools for site visitors to customize their site experience. Examples include adjusting color contrast, changing a site’s font or font size, disabling animations, and more.

About AudioEye
AudioEye is an industry-leading software solution delivering immediate ADA and WCAG accessibility compliance at scale. Through patented technology, subject matter expertise and proprietary processes, AudioEye is eradicating all barriers to digital accessibility, helping creators get accessible and supporting them with ongoing advisory and automated upkeep. Trusted by the FCC, ADP, SSA, Uber, and more, AudioEye helps everyone identify and resolve issues of accessibility and enhance user experiences, automating digital accessibility for the widest audiences. AudioEye stands out among its competitors because it delivers Machine Learning/AI-driven accessibility without fundamental changes to site architecture. Join our movement at www.audioeye.com.

About Duda
Duda is the leading web design platform for all companies that offer web design services to small businesses. The company serves all types of customers, from freelance web professionals and digital agencies, all the way up to the largest hosting companies, SaaS platforms and online publishers in the world.

Duda was founded by Itai Sadan and Amir Glatt in 2009, and raised a $25 million growth equity round from Susquehanna Growth Equity (SGE) in 2019. Based in Palo Alto, California, it currently hosts more than 15 million websites and was named PCMag’s Editors’ Choice website builder in 2017, 2018 and 2019. 

Media Contacts:
AudioEye:
Rachel Sales
Silicon Valley Communications
(347) 601-5350
[email protected]

Investor Contact:
Matt Glover or Tom Colton
[email protected]
(949) 574-3860

Duda:
Christopher Carfi
Duda VP of Content & Product Marketing
1-775-442-4740
[email protected]

Kiosk Manufacturer Association (KMA) Announces Research Panel, MCR and NRF

Press release BusinessWire Dec 13, 2019

WESTMINSTER, Colo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–KMA’s ADA & Accessibility Research Panel serves as an ongoing feedback mechanism between KMA and the community. We invite companies interested in accessibility, associations dedicated to accessibility as well as users who are blind or partially sighted to join and share insights and opinions on accessible technology and more through focus groups, online questionnaires & telephone surveys. Join the KMA ADA research panel today and help shape the future of accessible media.

In tandem with the research panel, KMA invites you to take our ADA Accessibility Quiz and qualify for a free consultation review. Register for a free copy of our MCR (Mandatory Current Requirements) ADA Guidelines as recommended by the KMA at our recent meeting with the U.S. Access Board in Washington, DC. Take the quiz here.

NRF 2020 – Visit with us in NYC on January 12-14 at NRF 2020 at booth 1703. For a complete preview of KMA companies at NRF you can read our NRF 2020 Preview.

KMA News

If your company, organization, association, local, city, state or federal agency would like to participate at some level with the KMA, please contact [email protected] or call 720-324-1837

The KMA ADA Committee consists of Olea KiosksKioWareKioskGroupStorm InterfaceFrank Mayer and Associates, Inc.VisperoPeerless-AVMimoMonitorsKIOSK (KIS)Turnkey KiosksDynatouchAudioEye and Tech For All Consulting.

Thanks for the generous financial support of our GOLD sponsors Olea Kiosks | KioWare | Nanonation | Pyramid | Frank Mayer | Vispero | Zebra ZIVELO

Contacts

KMA
Craig Keefner
[email protected]
720-324-1837

An Accessible Kiosk

Ensuring an Accessible Kiosk Experience

Editors Note:  Worth noting the image shows QSR self order kiosk by Olea Kiosks and you can see the Audio Nav pad by Storm Devices integrated.

Restaurants are increasingly reliant on self-service technology to improve the customer experience. From handheld or desktop tablets used to collect payment to kiosks used for self-service ordering, technology allows restaurants to provide a variety of options to customers to enhance their visit. However, it is incumbent upon restaurants to provide an accessible and equal experience for all their customers when utilizing these new technologies.

Customers with disabilities are often left out of the interactive experience due to the misconception that guests who are blind or who have low vision are more easily satisfied with the assistance of an in-person attendant. Yet this alternative does not provide an experience comparable to that of a non-visually impaired patron. Most people with disabilities do not want to be treated any differently from anyone else, and an in-person attendant often serves as a reminder of their disability.

The Future of Kiosks in the Restaurant Industry

Kiosks allow users to avoid lines and oftentimes allow them a greater ability to customize their order.  Kiosk deployers typically attempt to design the kiosk interface to decrease the time it takes for a user to place an order. No one – neither the restaurant nor the restaurant patron – is well-served if the time it takes to place an order on a kiosk is significantly slower for users with disabilities and requires additional human assistance.

Restaurant self-service kiosks are currently deployed in leading restaurant chains such as Taco Bell, KFC, Panera Bread, Wendy’s, Subway, and Dunkin’ Donuts via both pilots and full international rollouts.  Additionally, tabletop ordering or payment tablets are used in TGI Fridays, Olive Garden, Friendly’s, Tropical Smoothie, and Chili’s, to name a few.  Self-ordering and self-service POS solutions are running apps such as Appetize, Tillster, and Ziosk. In these examples, the user experience should be accessible for all patrons, whether on a robust kiosk enclosure or a small handheld tablet.

Read full article at Modern Restaurant Management

Interested in Accessibility Consulting for your kiosk or website? Contact us.

Join Our Accessibility Research Panel

Join Our ADA Research Panel

KMA ADA Accessibility Certified KMA’s Accessibility Research Panel serves as an ongoing feedback mechanism between KMA and the community. We invite companies interested in accessibility, associations dedicated to accessibility as well as users who are blind or partially sighted are invited to join and share insights and opinions on accessible technology and more through focus groups, online questionnaires and telephone surveys. Join the KMA ADA research panel today and help shape the future of accessible media.

Your privacy is very important to us and we want you to feel comfortable engaging with us online. KMA’s Privacy Policy is posted here and we encourage you to review it and contact us at [email protected] with any questions or concerns.

How to Join

To register for the KMA Research Panel please fill out the form below or call 1-720-324-1837.


Types of Research

​KMA is committed to learning more about the interests of the blind and partially sighted community across the world. Panel members will be asked, at different times during the year, to participate in information-gathering projects, which may include:

Focus Groups

​A focus group is a form of research in which a group of people share their perceptions, opinions, beliefs and attitudes towards a product, service, concept or advertisement. Questions are asked by a moderator in an interactive group setting.

Online Surveys

​Online surveys are usually used with a large group of people so the answers can be statistically reviewed and analyzed. This type of survey can range from being short with just a couple of questions or long with in-depth areas being explored with many questions.

Telephone Interviews

​A telephone interview is a process of data collection using a standardized questionnaire and calling panel members. It is a great alternative when online access isn’t the preference for respondents.

ADA and Accessibility Quiz and MCR Guidelines for ADA

Self Service ADA Accessibility Requirements and Quiz

Kiosk Industry and KMA are offering a free consultation for ADA and Accessibility for your self-service project.  Also to assist, a downloadable PDF with current ADA, Section 508 and ACA regulations that are currently mandated.

Excerpt below —

Are your kiosks ADA-compliant? Typically prospects and customers will include a stipulation that the units be ADA-compliant.  We see many requests for proposals from city, state and federal agencies where that one line is the only line about ADA.

Section 508 and the ACAA only apply to federal correct?  The long answer is No [see Accessibility FAQ on kma.global]. They apply to everybody.

Almost all kiosks are ADA-compliant, to a degree. Most all likely will observe basic reach requirements but that is only one of over 30 standing regulations concerning hardware. And there are another 30 or so which apply to the software and interface.

So, go ahead and test your knowledge. You can also schedule a free consultation.

Take me to the Kiosk and Accessibility Update

What accessibility looks like 30 years after the ADA passed

Posted on kma.global May 2019 from Denver Post

Excerpt from The Denver Post May 2019

It is also a reminder of why it’s important to keep the pressure on government and private entities to make public places accessible to all.

“The sort of run-of-the mill storefronts, restaurants, retail store, those really should be accessible now and a lot are but too many still are not,” said Kenneth Shiotani, senior staff attorney for the National Disability Right Network, which is based in Washington, D.C.

He said outdoor spaces, such as beaches and trails, pose more challenges than man-made structures when it comes to accessibility and for that reason, new guidelines were set for them in 2013. But Meridian Hill Park, which boasts of having the largest cascading fountain in the country, seems much more structured than other outdoor spaces, he said.

“I think the wedding party had reasonable expectations that 30 years later [after the ADA was passed] a federal park would be accessible,” Shiotani said. “It’s a public park, it’s paid for by public dollars, it should ultimately be accessible for everybody.”

How Companies Can Prevent ADA Website Accessibility Lawsuits

Reprinted from KMA Global

Every day, websites and mobile apps prevent people from using them. Ignoring accessibility is no longer a viable option.

How do you prevent your company from being a target for a website accessibility ADA lawsuit?

Guidelines for websites wanting to be accessible to people with disabilities have existed for nearly two decades thanks to the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative.

A close cousin to usability and user experience design, accessibility improves the overall ease of use for webpages and mobile applications by removing barriers and enabling more people to successfully complete tasks.

We know now that disabilities are only one area that accessibility addresses.

Most companies do not understand how people use their website or mobile app, or how they use their mobile or assistive tech devices to complete tasks.

Even riskier is not knowing about updates in accessibility guidelines and new accessibility laws around the world.

Investing in Website Accessibility Is a Wise Marketing Decision

Internet marketers found themselves taking accessibility seriously when their data indicated poor conversions. They discovered that basic accessibility practices implemented directly into content enhanced organic SEO.

Many marketing agencies include website usability and accessibility reviews as part of their online marketing strategy for clients because a working website performs better and generates more revenue.

Adding an accessibility review to marketing service offerings is a step towards avoiding an ADA lawsuit, which of course, is a financial setback that can destroy web traffic and brand loyalty.

Convincing website owners and companies of the business case for accessibility is difficult. One reason is the cost.  Will they see a return on their investment?

I would rather choose to design an accessible website over paying for defense lawyers and losing revenue during remediation work.

Another concern is the lack of skilled developers trained in accessibility. Do they hire someone or train their staff?

Regardless of whether an accessibility specialist is hired or in-house developers are trained in accessibility, the education never ends.

Specialists are always looking for solutions and researching options that meet guidelines. In other words, training never ends.

Many companies lack an understanding of what accessibility is and why it is important. They may not know how or where to find help.

Accessibility advocates are everywhere writing articles, presenting webinars, participating in podcasts, and writing newsletters packed with tips and advice.

ADA lawsuits make the news nearly every day in the U.S. because there are no enforceable regulations for website accessibility. This is not the case for government websites.

Federal websites must adhere to Section 508 by law. State and local websites in the U.S. are required to check with their own state to see what standards are required.

Most will simply follow Section 508 or WCAG2.1 AAA guidelines.

If your website targets customers from around the world, you may need to know the accessibility laws in other countries. The UK and Canada, for example, are starting to enforce accessibility.

In the U.S., there has been no change in the status of ADA website accessibility laws this year.

Some judges have ruled that the lack of regulation or legal standards for website accessibility does not mean that accessibility should be ignored.

Read complete article at Search Engine Journal May 2019

Making Japan Accessible to All RISING NHK WORLD English

Making Japan Accessible

 

Universal design aims to create an environment accessible to all, regardless of age, or linguistic or physical limitations. As Tokyo prepares for the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, one venture firm working to make Japan a world leader in this area is led by Toshiya Kakiuchi. Wheelchair bound since childhood due to brittle bone disease, this young entrepreneur provides consulting on facilities and services for the disabled, aiming to change preconceptions and facilitate true hospitality.

Source: www.youtube.com

Very good documentary on Toshiya Kakiuchi and Japan accessibility features. Includes Narita airport and restaurants.

At one point the employees of Narita don glasses, weights and other encumbrances to simulate disability and how the airport works and doesn’t work for them.

Remembering the ADA legacy of President Bush

With the passing of the 41st president, it’s worth remembering what may be his signature achievement.

Richard Slawsky is an Educator and freelance writer, specializing in the digital signage and kiosk industries.Louisville, Kentucky Area

The death of former president George H.W. Bush Nov. 30 at age 94 prompted a host of reminiscing in the media. Bush’s passing, many wrote, was the end of an era where politicians acted like ladies and gentlemen, treating friend and foe alike with dignity and respect.

Much of it was revisionism, of course. Bush’s Willie Horton campaign ad in his 1988 battle with Michael Dukakis is still discussed in political science classes because of its racial overtones. Many of the tactics used in his 1992 campaign against Bill Clinton, buoyed by the spread of the Internet, set the stage for the dysfunction currently plaguing both media and government. And one might argue that the effects of Bush’s handling of the invasion of Iraq are still being felt today.

Still, Bush guided the country through perilous waters as the Berlin Wall fell and the Soviet Union collapsed. And if there was something alive during Bush’s time that seems to be gone today, it’s the ability to compromise; for opposing sides to come together and accomplish something for the greater good.

On July 26, 1990, Bush signed what’s been called the most sweeping civil rights legislation enacted since the 1960s: The Americans with Disabilities Act. The signing came just weeks after the bill sailed through Congress with overwhelming bipartisan support.

And while the effectiveness of the ADA remains a subject for debate, there’s no doubt about its impact on the kiosk industry, the country at large and most importantly, the lives of people with disabilities.

Long in the making

Although the ADA was codified into law during Bush’s tenure, it has its roots in the three pieces of major civil rights legislation passed in the 1960s: the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Civil Rights Act of 1968. According to the Mid-Atlantic ADA Center, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 covered employers, those receiving federal funds and places of public accommodation such as restaurants and bus stations, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, religion and national origin.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 protects the voting rights of minorities, while the Civil Rights Act of 1968 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, religion, national origin and sex in the sale and rental of housing.

None of that legislation, though, covered people with disabilities. It wasn’t until the next decade when the country saw significant movement on disability rights. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibited discrimination on the basis of disability in federal programs and by recipients of federal financial assistance. In 1975, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act mandated that public schools accepting federal funds provide equal access to education for children with physical and mental disabilities. The act was revised and renamed the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 1990.

Although the 70s-era legislation was a start, it was the ADA that addressed discrimination against people with disabilities in many employment situations and public accommodations in the private sector. The bill’s effect wasn’t confined to the United States. According to Patrisha Wright, co-founder of the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund, the ADA served as the inspiration for the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and has prompted several other countries to pass similar legislation.

An unlikely champion

Although Bush championed the ADA’s passage, his support for disability rights legislation was something that few could have predicted. According to Lex Frieden, executive director of the National Council on the Handicapped, Bush had a major encounter with disability issues in the public sphere when then-President Ronald Reagan appointed him to oversee a task force that was working to weaken the Education for All Handicapped Children Act.

“Parents of kids with disabilities heard about that and began to call and write the White House and express their anger and angst to Vice President Bush,” Frieden told the Pacific Standard. “He was taken aback about that. He addressed his staff and told them back off [from gutting the EHCA].”

In addition, many in government were actively in favor of disability rights legislation, including then-Sen. Robert Dole of Kansas, who suffered wounds in World War II that left his right arm permanently disabled and his left arm minimally functional, and former White House Press Secretary James Brady, who was left partially paralyzed after being shot in March 1980 during John Hinckley’s assassination attempt on President Reagan. Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, whose brother was deaf, was the chief sponsor of the ADA in the Senate.

“It’s been the work of a true coalition, a strong and inspiring coalition of people who have shared both a dream and a passionate determination to make that dream come true,” Bush said at the signing, according to the. “It’s been a coalition in the finest spirit—a joining of Democrats and Republicans, of the  legislative and the executive branches, of federal and state agencies, of public officials and private citizens, of people with disabilities and without.”

Much left to be done

The ADA has remained controversial since its passage, garnering criticism for the barrage of lawsuits it has prompted over the years.

At the same time, much of the technology we use in our daily lives wasn’t even in existence in 1990, so many technology providers are working to accommodate those with disabilities despite vague and often-changing government guidance. In many cases, the kiosk industry is at the forefront of those efforts.

Kiosk manufacturers have long adhered to dimension standards to ensure their devices can be accessed by those in wheelchairs, and have included assistive technologies such as audio headset connections and the ability to adjust text size on displays. Over the past few years, companies such as Storm Interface have developed touchpads, voice recognition capabilities and other tools to make it easier for those with limited hand motion and other disabilities to access kiosks, while companies such as GestureTek have developed video gesture technologies that enable sight-impaired people to interact with touchscreens.

And not long ago, the Kiosk Manufacturers Association created a working group of kiosk manufacturers and other experts to help address usability and compliance issues.

So while every issue with ADA compliance when it comes to kiosks can’t be foreseen, and many are left to the courts to decide, the industry continues to work towards making self-service technology accessible by all.

Nearly 40 years ago, George H.W. Bush laid down a challenge to make the United States a place where people with disabilities wouldn’t be excluded from the conveniences of life we all enjoy. There’s still much to be done, but the kiosk industry is working every day to meet that challenge.

Rest in peace, Mr. President.

More Information

U.S. Access Board 2018 Meeting KMA ADA Board

US Access Board We had our yearly meeting in Washington, DC on October 16th, 2018 and it was a productive meeting.  We thank the U.S. Access Board for having us and meeting with us. Thank you.

In attendance:
Devices for Show and Tell Included:
  • Audio NavPad we guess that is being tested by companies like Amazon and others [Storm Technology]
  • Haptic touchscreen with programmable friction  [Mimo Monitors]
Agenda

It was a full agenda and there were several takeways. Also KMA provided sample Smart City RFPs from actual requests to help the Access Board gain a better understanding of the role of ADA and Accessibility in those types of projects.

One of the agenda items was to introduce to the Access Board our new ADA and Accessibility Co-Chairs Laura Miller and Randy Amundson.

Thanks from all of us at KMA.

Click on any of the pictures for full size image.

 

For reference here is the FINAL DRAFT Whitepaper. The Use of Voice Recognition and Speech Command Technology as an Assistive Interface for ICT in Public Spaces for Audio. If you have comments please send them to [email protected] or contact Peter at Storm Interface.

Other related articles:

 

ADA Kiosk Tech Brief – Gesture Technology

ADA Kiosk Tech Brief – Gesture Technology Gesture Technology for Kiosk

Last week we went thru a demonstration of gesture technology for kiosk for use by handicapped users. People unable to move their arms.  People unable to speak.

People with ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, Spinal Cord Injury, Parkinsons, Cerebral Palsy and even some cases of Arthritis.

Furthermore, some people may not be able to use voice either, or even if they could, there may be noise or privacy concerns preventing use of voice.

We had a YouTube video created for us which demonstrates 3 different ways in which a user can choose buttons on a kiosk screen in a totally hands-free and voice-free fashion via use of head motion and/or smiling.

  1. Head pointing and dwell clicking.
  2. Head pointing and smile clicking.
  3. Smiling only (with scanning)

Gesture Technology for Kiosk

Gesture Kiosk Software additional info:

For more information email Uday at Percept-D here.

ADA Accessibility Tip – Integrating Storm NavPad

ADA Accessibility Tip – Integrating Storm NavPad

We get asked about configuring the Storm NavPad and it comes with API/SDK which lets programmers configure it. In Windows you can even light the lights so to speak.  There are firms that specialize in assisting with that exact sort of thing (listed on our ADA page).

Another less software intensive is to use a lockdown such as KioWare.  See the screenshots below.

See below —  the Accessibility screen for turning on Nav-Pad support.  Also, where you turn on JAWS and ZoomText.  Turning Nav-Pad on automatically creates Hotkeys for all the NavPad keys.

navpad hotkeys

Here are all the hotkeys

navpad hotkeys

And here we show all the different ways to configure a Hotkey.  The ‘Perform this action:’ list box has ~20 predefined actions: Begin/Renew Session, Copy, Paste, Toggle Virt Kbd, Volume Up/Down, etc…

navpad hotkey details

 

American Council of the Blind sues Eatsa over kiosk and app access

American Council of the Blind sues Eatsa over kiosk ADA and app accessADA Kiosk Actions Eatsa

The American Council of the Blind has sued Eatsa, a fast-food chain that uses automated self-service kiosks and ordering apps, over insufficient access, according to a press release. Disability Rights Advocates (DRA), a national nonprofit legal center, filed

Source: www.fastcasual.com

It’s pretty simple providing some access for the blind, doesn’t have to be every single machine. Somebody did not think this thru…


From Recode.Net

Eatsa, for example, uses iPads for its in-store kiosks, according to its website. And Apple has for years included screen-reading accessibility technology — which can dictate on-screen items to blind people — in its iOS devices, and has made those tools available to developers.

But “Eatsa has configured its systems so that the [screen reader capability] is not usable on the iPad,” said Rebecca Serbin, an attorney with Disability Rights Advocates, the nonprofit representing the plaintiffs in the class action lawsuit. “So the technology to make Eatsa accessible exists, but Eatsa just didn’t care enough to include that in their design.”

Adding things like a tactile keypad with braille, or making the iPad’s headphone jack accessible — currently obstructed by the frame it’s mounted on — would allow customers with vision impairment to still use Eatsa’s ordering system, according to the complaint.

Though it’s possible for customers at the restaurant to never interact with a human worker, each location does have a staff person or two in the front to assist customers if needed. But the suit further points out that the way customers can request help from one of these employees is also via a button on the iPad, which is not accessible to blind and low-vision customers.

Even the cubbyholes where food is served have no way to opt for audible cues. The whole process is silent, thus making it inaccessible, the lawsuit claims.

ADA Accessibility – Storm Interface – Software and Configuration of NavBar

How To Configure Storm Interface Accessibility NavBar NavPad

Here are some quick notes on configuring Storm Interface products.


audio nav ada device
Audio navigation device. Click for full size. Courtesy Storm Interface

The functionality of the Nav-Bar is the same as that for all of Storm’s ATP products.

It enumerates as a combined HID/audio device, so no special drivers or software is required. Connection to the host system is via a single USB cable. When a headset is inserted into the audio jack or a button is pressed, the keypad transmits a unique keycode to the host system. Upon receipt of the keycode, the host system must de designed such that it will act appropriately. For example, upon receipt of the keycode for ‘Jack In’ then the audio should start playing.

The products dispatched from the factory are configured to use the default key code tables (as shown in the attached, which is a page from the product’s technical manual). If required, these keycodes can be changed by the customer by using a free software utility provided by Storm. This software utility is available to download from Storm’s website here:

http://www.storm-interface.com/downloads/?dlcat=Software

(Nav-Bar™ with Audio Module Utility version 6.0)

How to use the software utility is explained in the technical manual which I’ve attached, please see page 17 & 18.

=============================================

The USB key-press codes can also be changed to whatever is required. Up/Down keys can be multi-media volume control or HID keyboard up/down

We also supply an API so that the host machine can interact directly with our product.

Instructions for the Utility and the API are included in the Technical Manual for each product.

See links to these below

Link to Nav-Pad product page showing available downloads for Software Utilities and Technical Manual

http://www.storm-interface.com/assistive-technology-products/nav-padtm/nav-pad-8-keys-usb-interface-audio-processor.html

Link to Nav-Bar product page showing available downloads for Software Utilities and Technical Manual

http://www.storm-interface.com/assistive-technology-products/nav-bar/navbartm-silver-white-keys-under-panel-mount.html

Storm Interface

ADA News – RNIB Testing Confirms Compliance with ADA Requirements

RNIB Testing Confirms Compliance with ADA Requirements

With so much conflicting information about what manufacturers should do to ensure compliance with ADA, Storm Interface approached the RNIB for guidance and confirmation of conformance.

The Royal National Institute for Blind People provide laboratory testing and accreditation services to the World Blind Union and are one of the world’s (if not the most)  recognized authorities in the accessibility sector. Storm had previously been commended by the RNIB for their work in achieving accessibility, but thought it best to specifically confirm compliance with ADA.

The following is a copy of their conclusions. These were drawn after completion of a comprehensive test program and assessment of Storm’s assistive technology product range.  Storm is proud to have been recognized by the Royal National Institute for Blind People under their “RNIB Tried and Tested” program.

rnib storm interface

January 2018

Dear Peter,

RNIB have assessed the various Storm keypads for compliance with the ADA standard for input devices (707.6) and our findings are summarised below. The Storm keyboards included are:

1. NavBar
a. Black with coloured keys EZB6-63000
b. Black with white keys EZB6-53000
c. Silver-grey with coloured keys EZB6-73002
d. Silver-grey with white keys EZB6-43000

2. NavPad
a. 5 Button EZ05-23001
b. 6 Button EZ06-23001
c. 8 Button EZ08-23001

3. AudioNav 1406-33001

707.6.1 Input Controls.
The ADA states: “At least one tactilely discernible input control shall be provided for each function. Where provided, key surfaces not on active areas of display screens, shall be raised above surrounding surfaces. Where membrane keys are the only method of input, each shall be tactilely discernible from surrounding surfaces and adjacent keys.”

RNIB assessment:
1. NavBar (all models specified above)
The Nav-Bar has 6 raised buttons in different shapes. The buttons are easy to feel and press and have tactile markings on them as well to help with identification.
Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

2. NavPad (5, 6 or 8 keys)
The Nav-Pad comes in three different designs and had 5, 6 or 8 buttons in different shapes. The buttons are easy to feel and press and have tactile markings on them as well to help with identification.
Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

3. AudioNav
The silver Audio-Nav has 5 buttons around a centre button. There are tactile markings on each of the 4 arrow buttons and a tactile circle on the centre OK button. The buttons are easy to feel.
Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

707.6.2: Numeric keys.
This is not applicable as there are no numeric keypads on the keyboards tested.

707.6.3.1 Contrast.
The ADA states: “Function keys shall contrast visually from background surfaces. Characters and symbols on key surfaces shall contrast visually from key surfaces. Visual contrast shall be either light-on-dark or dark-on-light.”

RNIB assessment:
RNIB assesses the colour contrast using simulation glasses developed by Cambridge University (http://www.inclusivedesigntoolkit.com/csg/csg.html). These glasses simulate a general loss of ability to see fine detail including cloudy vision. RNIB uses the benchmark given by the developers which indicates that the product excludes less than 1% of the population.

1. NavBar (all models specified above)
The text and icons on the buttons have been tested with sim specs to simulate reduced contrast. The contrast passes in the sense that it ‘excludes less than 1% of the population’. For ADA we believe this will be sufficient.

The buttons on the black and the silver/grey Nav-Bar have been tested with the sim specs and it passes in the sense that it ‘excludes less than 1% of the population’. For ADA we believe this will be sufficient.

Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

2. NavPad
The text and icons on the buttons have been tested with sim specs to simulate reduced contrast. The contrast passes in the sense that it ‘excludes less than 1% of the population’. For ADA we believe this will be sufficient.

The buttons on the brushed silver background have been tested with the sim specs and the contrast passes in the sense that they ‘exclude less than 1% of the population’. For ADA we believe this will be sufficient.

Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

3. AudioNav
On the silver Audio-Nav the buttons have been tested with the sim specs and the contrast passes in the sense that they ‘exclude less than 1% of the population’. For ADA we believe this will be sufficient.

Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

707.6.3.2 Tactile Symbols.
The standard states: “Function key surfaces shall have tactile symbols as follows: Enter or Proceed key: raised circle; Clear or Correct key: raised left arrow; Cancel key: raised letter ex; Add Value key: raised plus sign; Decrease Value key: raised minus sign.”

RNIB assessment:
1. NavBar
The only button that this applies to is the round OK/Enter button. This button is round and has a tactile circle on the top. The tactile circle is very easy to feel.
Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

2. NavPad
The only button that this applies to is the round OK/Enter button. This button is round and has a tactile circle on the top. The tactile circle is very easy to feel.
Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

3. AudioNav
The OK button in the centre of the Audio-Nav has a tactile circle on it that is easy to feel.
Conclusion: RNIB believes this passes the ADA requirements

Disclaimer
RNIB has used its best endeavours to provide this opinion basing our results on the testing as specified above. RNIB cannot accept any responsibility or liability for claims made against this opinion.

Yours sincerely,

Scott Lynch
Managing Director – RNIB Solutions

Storm Interface and Tech for All Announce Collaboration

Storm Interface MEDIA RELEASE
Contact: Peter Jarvis
Storm Interface
Phone: +44 (0)1895 456200
Email: [email protected]
London, England. January 2018
Web: www.storm-interface.com

Storm Interface and Tech for All build on a shared vision

As the ICT sector in the U.S. is challenged to conform with the ADA and other accessibility regulations, two leading experts are collaborating to offer compliant and effective solutions.

Storm Interface Aggressive and high profile class actions against well-known retailers, restaurant chains, vending machine operators, healthcare providers and major airlines have sent a cold shiver through businesses deploying touch-screen, self-service terminals. It is becoming clear that anything less than full compliance with both domestic and international mandates creates significant litigation risks. Inevitably this harms reputations and may lead to costly court-supervised settlements.

Many businesses are striving to make their products, services and infrastructure as accessible as they can possibly be and not just to achieve compliance. This forward thinking universal design approach improves usability for all users including those with sensory impairment or limited mobility. It improves efficiency, productivity, and enhances their relationship with the consumer.

Storm Interface and Tech for All, Inc. have announced a formal collaboration to help clients deliver accessible experiences for people with disabilities. Storm Interface is the UK manufacturer of audible system interfaces and content navigation devices. Tech for All is a leading US-based international consulting firm focused on the accessibility and universal design of electronic, information, and communication technologies.

“The inter-dependence of accessible hardware and effectively designed application software is obvious”, said Storm’s Peter Jarvis. “However, too often ICT designers and specifiers consider the two factors of accessibility separately, as if they were unrelated”. Storm works with specialist kiosk software developers to ensure that Storm’s USB-connected devices are universally supported throughout the ICT sector. By collaborating with established expert developers such as Tech for All, Storm is able to provide clients with a complete accessibility solution.

Tech for All’s Caesar Eghtesadi agrees, “Our collaborative development approach produces a synergistic accessible design that delivers a successful experience for all users, including those with disabilities. This coordinated development approach is more cost-effective and efficient than the current adapt-and-patch approach.”

Background Information:

About Storm Interface
For more than 30 years Storm Interface have designed and manufactured secure, rugged and reliable keypads,keyboards and interface devices. Storm products are built to withstand rough use and abuse in unattended public-use and industrial applications. Storm Assistive Technology Products are recognized by the Royal National Institute for Blind People under their ‘RNIB Tried and Tested’ program.www.storm-interface.com

About Tech for All, Inc.
Tech for All, Inc. has for over 16 years served small to Fortune 500 companies in several industries, educational institutions, NGOs, and government agencies. It provides a full range of accessibility consulting services including planning, evaluation, design, development support, testing, implementation/deployment,  and monitoring. www.TFAConsulting.com

Our contact details are as follows:
USA
Storm Interface
13835 N Tatum Blvd. Suite 9-510
Phoenix, AZ 85032
Tel: +1 480 584 3518
Email: [email protected]

Tech for All, Inc.
P.O. Box 213473
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33421
Tel: +1 561 333 2835
Email: [email protected]

UK, Europe and Other Territories
Storm Interface
14 Bentinck Court
Bentinck Road
West Drayton
Middlesex
UB7 7RQ
United Kingdom
Tel +44 (0)1895 431421
Email: [email protected]