Tag Archives: kiosk

In The Wild – Not So Great Kiosk Experience

We are constantly using kiosks and oftentimes we find kiosk implementations are less than best case to put it kindly.


Kiosk Experience 1

This is an email I received from a very experienced kiosk analyst at a Senior Living retirement facility

I used a new kiosk system last week to get a Visitor’s Pass at a big retirement facility where several canasta buddies live and where we were going to be playing that afternoon.. The touch screen was problematic but eventually I got signed up. I was told that once you registered, every subsequent visit would be much easier – you would just enter your phone number and the system would print out your visitor’s pass. Except when I entered my phone number, it said it wasn’t recognized and that I’d have to register all over again.
The people behind the desk said that if you registered at one kiosk (there are 2) you would also have to register at the other one. I was flabbergasted.
I told them that I used to evaluate these systems for a living and this was the STUPIDEST SYSTEM I HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED. 
Have you ever encountered a system so dumb?

Kiosk Experience 2

Kiosk ExperienceThe next experience took place at a Chili’s and involved the Ziosk. I’m not of a big fan of touching units like these because I am a germaphobe and there isn’t any cleaning supplies or schedule indicated (unlike grocery stores I go into and get carts).
We had a gift card with $20 on it and decided to use it up and went to Chili’s. I had the Rib Eye steak (which reminded me of trip I once took to Abuja) but the steak was fine.
We went to pay and I grabbed the waitress and asked if she would bring the check and take care of us. Gift cards always introduce extra variable into process and I knew how long it would take to complete. I figured 5 minutes in time to catch the news I wanted to see.
Start the clock. It’s 6:00pm.
She asked me if I wanted to use Ziosk and I said not really and she asked if I was sure and I said ok.
The bill came to $37 and the Ziosk took my gift card just fine though I had to swipe it on the likely dirty card swipe three times. It said Fine and I added a $7 tip, said ok and 30 secs later it started to print my receipt out.
I was surprised since I figured there was another $24 to account for.
For a brief moment I considered just walking out and considering it done and maybe I had more on the card than I thought. People like to think they have more money than they have as a rule.
But the print got stuck halfway thru and the red light started flashing. About 4 minutes later the waitress showed up and she said she’d take care of it. I mentioned I was pretty sure I only had $21 on the gift card. She flipped the Ziosk over and opened it up where the printer was and left it on the table.
A few minutes later she came back with receipt for $37. Meanwhile the manager stopped by and wanted to make sure there was no confusion.
My wife looked at her watch and said she had cash so we got that out and waiting for the waitress to return and we just counted out the balance and then added the tip and gave her the money.
Time: 6:20

Kiosk Experience 3

And then there is technical failure. Below is a McDonalds screen on the outdoor ordering kiosk. I believe this was in Los Angeles California. You can see the burnout spots. When an LCD overheats in the sun it goes isotropic. If it happens enough it cannot recover and those pixels die. This monitor is literally fried in those zones.

mcdonalds outdoor kiosk screen


Kiosk Experience 4 “Not So Bad?”

And then there was Australia this week and McDonalds kiosk hack.
In the video, they order 10 burgers for $1 each using the kiosks. Then, they remove the meat from the ten burgers, which discounts each of the burgers by $1.10—leaving enough surplus to cover the cost of a regularly priced burger at McDonald’s.

Yum Kiosks – Pushing Forward QSR Technology

Delivery, kiosks and other digital efforts are taking more prominent roles at Yum! Brands, moves that serve as a good reflection of overall trends in the quick service restaurant (QSR) space. Yum operates the Pizza Hut, Taco Bell and KFC chains, and the company’s fourth-quarter results, released Thursday (Feb. 7), provided details about where those […]

Source: www.pymnts.com

Published on Pymnts.com Feb 7

Kiosks, too, are another area of innovation targeted by Yum in 2019. By 2020, Gibbs said, “our goal is to have 5,000 restaurants with kiosks.”

Indeed, according to that PYMNTS research, “larger chains are more likely than smaller ones to have in-store kiosks, and they’re also more likely to offer their own mobile apps.” That said, only 3 percent of QSR managers said that self-service kiosks stand as the most common method for placing orders.

Loyalty, too, is another feature that QSR customers want more of, with nearly 80 percent of them saying such programs are important to the future of success of QSRs. That compared with about 48 percent of QSR managers who said the same. Yum, according to its Q4 conference call, seems to be increasingly tilting toward those customer perceptions.

Shoppers Order Fresh Veg Off Kiosk

Grocer Lets Shoppers Order Fresh Veg Off Kiosk, From On-Premise Roof Garden –Grocers Use Kiosks For Vegetables

There is endless talk in this business about connecting digital signage to customer experience, but it’s not that often that I see initiatives that get beyond those customers seeing something…

Source: www.sixteen-nine.net

Grocery in Canada allows ordering fresh vegetables that are picked for you.

Kiosk History – the doomed weather kiosk in downtown Washington and Fake News  

Kiosk History – the doomed weather kiosk in downtown Washington and Fake Newsweather kiosk

The reliability of weather reports from a kiosk on Pennsylvania Avenue was a hot topic a century ago.

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

Washington’s weather kiosk was located on Pennsylvania Avenue, near E Street NW. It happened to be directly adjacent to The Washington Post building at the time.

Initially, the kiosk was quite popular with the public, and its reports were frequently cited by the media, particularly The Post. But after a couple of decades passed, Washingtonians began to complain that the kiosk was not reporting accurate temperature readings. The kiosk’s temperature was often 10 degrees warmer than the actual temperature, particularly on sunny afternoons.

The kiosk became a Great Depression-era “fake news” controversy in Washington.

Read the full article and thanks to Francie Mendelsohn of Summit Research for sending to us.

Water, Sewer Utility Payment Kiosk Opens In Alpharetta | Alpharetta, GA Patch

Utility Payment Kiosk

Fulton Opens New Water, Sewer Payment Kiosk – Alpharetta-Milton, GA – Fulton County has rolled out the kiosk and a walk-in window for North Fulton residents at the Customer Service Center at 11575 Maxwell Road.

Source: patch.com

JACK – Utility Payment Kiosk gets installed at Fulton County for utility bill payment. Check or Credit Card (no cash)

ALPHARETTA, GA — Residents in North Fulton who need to make payments to their county water and sewer bills will now have a more convenient way to do so.

Fulton County recently opened a new water and sewer bill payment kiosk and walk-in window in Alpharetta. The window and kiosk is located in the same location of the Fulton County Customer Service Center at 11575 Maxwell Road.

Residents can pay by check or credit card at the kiosk

What is a Kiosk – Kiosk Definition aka Define Kiosk

The Definitive Kiosk Definition or How do we most often Define Kiosk

The kiosk originally began as the town square notice board for the community to post notices.  The usual reference in Wikipedia will call out Persia as the originating language for the word. What began as common ground notice posting location matured into RMUs (Remote Merchandising Units) that you see in malls or wherever.  With advent of common internet they took on their electronic iteration in the late 90s.

For the masses it started with airline check-in terminals and photo kiosks (from Kodak and Fujifilm) and also ATMs.

For sure:

    • They allow interaction usually with touchscreen
    • Usually customers/prospects oriented

      kiosk definition the Bfit
      Click for full size image
    • Many are employee oriented
    • Generally a touchscreen.
    • Either informational or transactional in nature.

Follow Craig’s board Design Kiosk on Pinterest.

Kiosks today are very much different than those. They are self service kiosks, usually electronic, and can be found in all walks of life.  The form factor ranges from a mobile device to a tablet to a larger enclosures (usually metal but also plastic and wood).

Here are some the main categories for the modern day kiosk.

    • In malls, events, tradeshows and other locations you have the RMU, which is a Remote Merchandising Unit.  Point of Purchase fixture iterations. Many current self service kiosk companies evolved from these units design and manufacture and continue to do a large business in these. Examples would be Frank Mayer Associates & Inc., Olea Kiosk and Ikoniq (main business being RMUs).
    • It is generally interactive but not always.
    • It most often provides a computer (such as Dell Optiplex) and has a 17 or 19″ 5:4 aspect touchscreen (between 7 and 84 inches).
    • Most often it is unattended.
    • It is a standalone enclosure in most common iteration.
    • Examples follow
    • Airline Check-In Kiosks – pioneered by Kinetics and others. Major vendors include NCR, SITA, and dwindling IBM. They have also moved into the baggage area.
    • ATM Machines – Historically it has been NCR, Fujitsu, Nautilus, Triton, IBM with Wincor Nixdorf and the ISOs (Independent service operators).
    • Electronic kiosks – this is the big category. It basically includes all categories which can be bill pay kiosks, kiosk software for lockdown, financial kiosks and more.
    • Internet Cafes –  sometimes a keyboard can’t be beat. These are one of the originals and helped educate the masses on using the Internet everywhere.  We used them all the time when we would visit London, England.
    • POS Terminals – includes customer facing POS terminals whether for entering loyalty number.
    • Food Order Kiosk – McDonalds kiosk is prime example. Order your own burger made to your preferences.
    • Gaming Kiosks –  the military uses these for letting the soldiers relax (and train) at the same time.
    • Parking kiosks – whether on the street or in the garage
    • Outdoor kiosks – all kinds.
    • Hoteling – this is where office workers work at same building but can sign up for any desk for the day.  Larger companies experiment with this and in this age of BYOD it is relevant.
    • Information Kiosks terminals – can be as simple as barcode lookup in grocery aisle or online “showrooming”.  AKA Interactive kiosk.
    • Interactive Digital Signage – a contradiction in terms but Digital Signage often is a large touchscreen and offers Content Management Services as well as Advertising. The touchscreen provides major ROI component.
    • Immigration and Security Kiosks – found at airports as well as Border Control.  These units typically utilize biometrics.
    • Registration kiosks for loyalty and membership.
    • Gift card kiosks such Coinstar Gift Card Exchange.
    • Retail kiosk – this can be many iterations. The latest ones are beginning to introduce Beacons and Facial Recognition for recording demographics and traffic patterns and customer flow.
    • Gift Registry kiosk – one of the originals and still going.  Our teeth were cut developing the Bridal Registry and Baby Registry kiosks for Target. Multi-generational marketing at its best (kids shop where Mom shopped)
    • Tablet kiosk – typically used for registration and quick lookup they have the advantage of being small and can be place at eye level.
    • Vending – these can add nutritional information mandated by the government. They can dispense sandwiches, coffee and a large range of merchandise (Zoom is a pioneer).
    • Pharmacy kiosk – medicine prescription dispensing kiosks are becoming more popular.
    • Lockers – picking up your merchandise from Amazon or Fedx or UPS.
    • Charging kiosks –  need to charge your mobile phone?  There are kiosks for doing that.
    • Coin KIosks – the most famous is Coinstar.
    • Music, Movie and Media download kiosks – get your DVD on USB now
    • DVD kiosks –  still going with Redbox and others.  Locations and demographics are important.
    • Hospitality – hotel check-in kiosks
    • Healthcare – patient check-in kiosks
    • Telemedicine and Telehealth –  whether at the supermarket or at corporate headquarters, remote healthcare structures are hybrid of RMUs.  These extend into home monitoring and follow up for post operative patients to maximize results (and government incentive rewards).
    • Marijuana & Cannabis – one of the emerging markets with its high use of cash, security and new multiple form factors such as edibles.
    • Photo Kiosk – still going strong and one of the original heavy hitters. Kodak at one point had over 60,000 in place.
    • Prison kiosk – video visitation and more
    • Social kiosks – interacting with your friends at wanna-be-seen locales becomes fodder for Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. The payback is demographics.
    • Kiosk Software – lockdown software or Windows Kiosk Mode software is very popular. PROVISIO and KioWare are prime providers but versions for thin clients, Chrome Kiosk, and more are available.
    • Survey Kiosks – can be as simple as a 4 button “How Was Your Experience?” device (we like those) or a tablet.  Surveys are better being short to improve response rate.
    • Wayfinding kiosk – despite GPS enabled mobiles navigating a large structure can require clear instructions whether consumer or corporate.
    • Wine Kiosks – As a recommendation and selector function these do quite well. Experiments in dispensing wine were plagued by being poorly regulated and operated.

So what might be the definition?  Here is one: 

A computer terminal used by public or employees for services.

We’ll continue to add details and more information in the future.

 

 

Self-Service Association ADA Initiative

ADA Initiative

EASTLAKE, Colo., Oct. 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Self-Service Association ADA Initiative. The self-service and kiosk industry association forms AD

Source: www.prnewswire.com

EXCERPT:

EASTLAKE, Colo.Oct. 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Kiosk Industry Group Association has formed an ADA committee and an ADA working group.  And in November travel to Washington, DC to meet with the U.S. Access Board, the group responsible for writing ADA regulations.  The idea is to work with the Access Board on an ongoing basis to help them better define regulations.  We are also working with the ATMIA (www.atmia.com) as well and the ETA (www.electran.org) in this regard. Participation in the working group is open to all interested parties.

The ADA committee currently consists of Olea KiosksKiosk Information SystemsFrank Mayer and AssociatesKioWareTurnkey Kiosks and iPadKIosks.

October 2017 – Check In Kiosk

This report outlines the use of kiosks in hospital ambulatory and emergency departments as a way to improve efficiency and increase patient satisfaction. It describes the features and functions of kiosks, early results, the industry landscape, and provides some insights on best practices.

Source: check-in-kiosk.com

Research paper by CHF — Hospitals are deploying patient kiosks in two main settings: ambulatory departments and emergency departments. In the ambulatory setting, the most common uses of kiosks are for patient check-in, wayfinding assistance, collection of co-payments and outstanding balances, updating patient demographics, and to ask patients basic screening questions.

Faceoff: Kiosks vs. Tablets in HR and Healthcare

The choice between a tablet and a full-size kiosk comes down to the purpose for which it will be used.

From Olea Kiosks TheLab

Kiosks or Tablets in HR and Healthcare

Although kiosk technology is becoming commonplace in a variety of verticals, areas where it has had a particular impact include both human resources and health care.

On the human resources side, many companies are placing job application kiosks in retail stores or other highly trafficked areas, allowing them to recruit workers around the clock without having to staff a hiring booth. In addition, a kiosk in the break room or other employee area allows workers to check schedules and payroll information, request days off or make changes to their personnel file.

For health care providers, a waiting room kiosk allows patients to fill out forms or make payments on their account, taking some of the burden off the front desk staff. A kiosk in a pharmacy can perform functions ranging from blood pressure checks to telehealth consultations, while a kiosk in a hospital setting lets doctors easily check patient record, submit prescriptions for medications or schedule tests.

With the advent of tablet computers, the kiosk arena is becoming populated with units that feature a tablet at their core as well as units built from the ground up. When considering the addition of a kiosk network to supplement the HR department or modernize a health care facility, which is the better option? A full-fledged kiosk, or a tablet-based model?

Determining the need

Of course, like many things in the business world (and life in general) the answer is “it all depends.” Both have their advantages and drawbacks.

Factors to consider when choosing between a full-fledged kiosk and a tablet-based model is the function the unit is expected to perform, the space available and the number of people expected to use the device. One of the biggest factors to consider is the deployer’s budget.

tablet kiosk enclosure
tablet kiosk enclosure

“Tablets can be portable, very small, and placed nearly anywhere,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“The cost is low so placing multiple units becomes very easy,” Olea said. “Tablets can have one device hardwire-powered, and their built-in cameras can be coaxed into performing functions such as reading ID cards or barcodes.”

Verona kiosk
Click for full size

Olea Kiosks offers a complete line of tablet and full-size kiosks. Its tablet line can be mounted on a tabletop, a wall or on a freestanding mount, and units come with a card reader. On the full-size kiosk side, Olea offers several models specifically designed for the HR and health care spaces; its Verona model is the only pushbutton height-adjustable kiosk on the market. The units can be raised or lowered by 10 inches at the push of a button, making them easily accessible by a person of any height or ability.

The relative simplicity of a tablet can keep maintenance costs to a minimum. The ability to detach a tablet from its mount opens up additional opportunities, allowing a job applicant to take the device to their seat to fill out forms or giving doctors the ability to sit with patients and map out treatment plans.

On the down side, though, the ability to detach a tablet from its mount does create a greater risk of damage or theft. Some tablet management software systems leverage the unit’s GPS functionality to send an alert text or email if the device is taken outside a predefined area.

Full size kiosks, on the other hand, will cost more than a tablet kiosk but can do everything a tablet-based kiosk can do and more. Additional processing power can make it easier to implement advanced features such as telehealth services or one-on-one conferencing with the corporate HR department.

Although kiosks are certainly larger and take up a bit more space, the footprint of a freestanding tablet kiosk is only slightly smaller than a traditional kiosk, making space considerations a relatively minor concern.

“If you want to create more of a presence for your check-in area, a few full-sized kiosks lined up is often all that is required,” Olea said. “Also, a full-size kiosk can come equipped with more devices if needed like card scanners, barcode readers, printers and keyboards.”

Protecting privacy

One area of concern that can influence the choice of kiosk is compliance with privacy regulations in handling personal information. This can be particularly relevant in a health care facility, where running afoul of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) can result in fines running into the hundreds or thousands of dollars.

An advantage that a kiosk has over a tablet is that things like privacy filters can be embedded between the touch glass and the LCD screen, Olea said.

“On a tablet, anything you do would have to be on the screen surface itself and is very easily damaged and picked off,” he said. “Also, kiosks can feature printers with a retract function so if a patient does not take their print out the printer and retract the print and deposit it inside of the kiosk for safe disposal later.”

Still, there are privacy screens that can be incorporated into tablet kiosks to help protect user privacy.

Whichever route a deployer chooses, of critical importance will be compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. It’s in that area that full-size kiosks may have an edge. Full size kiosks can include headphone jacks with volume control and easily connect with external devices such as Braille keyboards or the Nav-Pad, a device that allows someone with impaired vision, restricted mobility or limited fine motor skills to use the kiosk through a series of highly tactile buttons and audio prompts.

The larger and brighter screens of a traditional kiosk also aid in the ADA compliance for self-service devices.

“ADA is becoming a major concern here in California and we suspect will become much more of an issue in other states as kiosks become more commonplace in the healthcare and HR fields,” Olea said.

“No longer can you get away with a kiosk just being ‘reachable’,” he said. “Most companies will say their product is ADA compliant, but they fail to mention they’ve only covered a very small spectrum of individuals with disabilities. Sure, someone in a wheelchair can reach the screen, but serving people with disabilities goes far beyond that.”

At the end of the day, the best way to provide a self-service solution that is accessible by all types of users, is compliant with privacy rules and helps improve operations for the deployer is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

Question For Day – Are kiosks installed prior to 2010 ADA regulations subject to 2010 regulations?

Question of the day – ADA Kiosk Compliance

ADA Kiosk ComplianceAre kiosks installed prior to 2010 ADA regulations subject to 2010 regulations?

Ok, I’ll take a shot at this. My name is Craig Keefner and I work for Olea Kiosks which is a highly skillled kiosk manufacturer and designer in ADA. Note that this is my personal opinion. The engineering design team never agrees with me 100%, usually for the better 🙂

“It depends…”.

What an answer eh…

The reason for that is that while there is no grandfather clause there is a “Safe Harbor” but it comes with conditions.

From the ADA National Network

The ADA does not have a provision to “grandfather” a facility but it does have a provision called “safe harbor” in the revised ADA regulations for businesses and state and local governments. A “safe harbor” means that you do not have to make modifications to elements in an existing building that comply with the 1991 Standards, even if the new 2010 Standards have different requirements for them. This provision is applied on an element-by-element basis.  However, if you choose to alter elements that were in compliance with the 1991 Standards, the safe harbor no longer applies so the altered elements must comply with the 2010 ADA Standards.

A “safe harbor” does not apply to elements that were NOT addressed in the original 1991 Standards but ARE addressed in the 2010 ADA Standards. These elements include recreation facilities such as swimming pools, play areas, exercise machines, miniature golf facilities, and bowling alleys. On or after March 15, 2012, public accommodations must remove architectural barriers to these elements listed above are subject to the new requirements in the 2010 Standards when it is readily achievable to do so.

Here is another take on it from Chain Store Age

Losing “Grandfather” Status: Between 2007 and 2014, the amount of ADA charges doubled from $54.5 million to $109.17 million, with 3,190 suits filed in 2007 compared to 5,347 suits in 2014. But some retailers may assume – incorrectly – they are already covered due to “grandfathering” rules.

Any development or remodeling completed using the previous 1991 ADA standards before the new changes became effective March 15, 2012 will be grandfathered as compliant with the ADA. However, if any element that meets the 1991 requirements is altered, it must then meet the newer standards, and the “safe harbor” no longer applies.

Complicating things here can be local and state laws (Unruh in California for example).

That’s why I will say, “it depends..”.

TO BE SURE — having said all that doesn’t mean people are not going to necessarily sue.  Some lawyers are more concerned with how much they can negotiate from you than whether it is right or wrong.

And if the units do not meet 2010 requirements, is it also “the better thing to do” to bring the units up to code, or at least mitigate in some way.  That could forestall  a frivolous suit which will cost thousands no matter what.

For more “opinion” like this on all types of subjects be sure and visit The Lab website which is run by Olea.  I’ll be doing a writeup on the kiosk market size and get into what exactly is a kiosk when we talk market size and units. Are ATMs a kiosk? Or POS checkouts?  Or are they there own singular purposed market which just so happens to incorporate some characteristics of a typical kiosk. If anything, I can gurantee you that am opinionated..

COMMENTS

On the article, the Safe harbor or even the ABA architectural barriers act according to the DOJ no building is supposed to  have to comply if built prior to the enactment of implementation 1992. However, lawsuit judgements have been altering that course even though the DOJ claims  Old construction vs. new construction. So grandfathering in is only a delay phase.
When Capitol Hill had to change things up.. Old building right. 🙂
I would add in  the ABA in your article. It mainly pertains to the Government buildings, but it slings over to the Accessibly through barriers in the ADA with no mention of safe harbor.
Steve Taylor with Taylor Stands and working head of ADA for ETA.
Resources
Credits
Steve Taylor with Taylor Stands
Mike James with iPadKiosks

More ADA News

KIOSK Information Systems Announces Bill Butler as New CEO

KIOSK, the Market Leader in Self-Service Solutions, announces new CEO. Bill Butler succeeds Tom Weaver, KIOSK’s CEO since 2012.

Owen Chen, CEO of Posiflex (KIOSK’s new parent company) also selected Bill Butler to help execute his vision of introducing new kiosk solutions to expand and diversify Posiflex’s point of sale product portfolio. Owen adds that “Bill will be very instrumental in our success as we introduce new self-service solutions into Posiflex’s Global Distribution channels.”

Bill is the successor to Tom Weaver, KIOSK’s CEO since 2012. Tom is transitioning into an Executive Consultant role, and will continue to actively guide the strategic direction of the company. Tom has been with KIOSK since 2003 in C-Level Sales and Management roles.

[Editors Note:  Here’s hoping to play a few rounds of golf with Tom now that he is clear]

Source: www.businesswire.com

Kiosk Setup – Metadefender Kiosk Unboxing and Set Up

OPSWAT – https://www.opswat.com Metadefender – https://www.opswat.com/products/metadefender In this video we show how to set up a new Metadefender kios

Source: www.youtube.com

Nice video on kiosk unbox and start up. The kiosk is designed and made by Olea.

UCP has Ingenico iUC285 Beta units

iUC285 Ingenico EMV Reader for Unattended Self Service

Unattended Card Payments Inc. Begins Shipping the iUC285 in the U.S. As main Ingenico VAR for unattended hardware, UCP Inc. announces they have received first shipment of iUC285 beta units.

Source: www.ucp-inc.com

These units are designed for unattended and are being certified with multiple processors as we speak.

Here is spec sheet.

iUC280 product info

Connected Technology Solutions Takes Innovation Award for UV-C Disinfecting Light for Kiosks

Antibacterial Kiosk

Source: www.latestsharenews.com

MENOMONEE FALLS, WI – 11 May, 2016 – Connected Technology Solutions, a Menomonee Falls, Wis., based manufacturer of kiosks and related self-service technology, has been named a winner of the 2016 I.Q. Innovation Awards for CleanTouch™, its ultra-effective UV-C light surface sanitizing solution.

CleanTouch™ is available on the company’s Patient Passport Express®, which is marketed as part of the CTS Healthcare Services® division. The PPE is a robust kiosk that provides check-in, bill-pay and other patient-facing functions at many of the country’s leading healthcare facilities, such as Cleveland

Antibacterial kiosk
Click for full image

Clinic, Ohio State University Health Systems and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

By employing a continuous bath of UV-C light across the kiosk’s touch surfaces, CleanTouch™ rapidly kills up to 99.9-percent of bacteria and viruses, leaving the screen clean for subsequent users. After each transaction, when the user steps away, a quick 30-second wash of light disinfects the screen, making it clean and ready for the next patient.IQ Award 01

The award ceremony was held in Milwaukee the week of May 17th.  Sharing the stage with CTS were such nationally known companies as Astronautics Corp. of America, Briggs & Stratton and Fiserv Inc.  Accepting the award for CTS & Sandra Nix CEO were Jared Timm and Craig Keefner.

Note –  Another very cool company there in speaking role was Scanalytics which does floor sensors for measuring footfall.  Impressive stuff.

Transit App Now Offers Bike Chattanooga Unlock And Pay Feature

This new feature gives casual riders the option to purchase day passes directly from their mobile device rather than through the Bike Chattanooga rental kiosk.

Source: www.chattanoogan.com

The app doubles as digital wayfinding for visitors as well. Nice use of app. Bluetooth operated locking mechanism I presume. See http://www.bikechattanooga.com/news.

SlabbKiosks Exhibits at HIMSS16

Look for SlabbKiosks at booth # 8477 on the HIMSS16 exhibition floor in Las Vegas, Nevada. Las Vegas, Nevada (PRWEB) February 28, 2016

SlabbKiosks will showcase two (2) of its healthcare kiosks on the exhibit floor for the 2016 HIMSS Conference & Exhibition at the Sands Expo and Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada from Feb. 29 – March 4, 2016. More than 40,000 healthcare industry professionals are expected at the conference, where they will learn about and discuss health IT issues, and on the exhibit floor, view innovative solutions designed to transform healthcare.

As an exhibitor, SlabbKiosks will launch a first-of-its-kind medical self-service and payment kiosk. They will also highlight the work they do in the healthcare industry with some of their partners including Crane Payment Innovations (CPI), PatientWay and PayEase.

“We are very excited to be a part of one of the largest healthcare tradeshows and thought it would be fitting to launch our new medical self-service and payment kiosk in an arena that brings so many healthcare professionals together. As with the many other industries we work in, we are always looking to provide solutions that facilitate more efficient and effective systems that ultimately enhance customer service”, stated President of SlabbKiosks, Peter te Lintel Hekkert.

Source: www.pressreleaserocket.net

X2 Kiosk by Slabbkiosk
Click to expand – X2 Kiosk by Slabbkiosk
Click to Expand - freestanding unit is our new X11 – a medical self-service and payment kiosk which was launched at the show.
Click to Expand – freestanding unit is our new X11 – a medical self-service and payment kiosk which was launched at the show.

Show Pictures including Crane with new payment devices

Click on the images to expand.