Tag Archives: kiosk history

Kiosk History Browser – The Original WWW Browser Turns 30 years old

Editors Note: This article originally appeared on Gizmodo.  Read full article on Gizmodo

Travel Back to 1990 With the Original World Wide Web Browser

Screenshot: CERN / Gizmodo

The World Wide Web turns 30 this year, and to celebrate three decades of utter chaos and brilliance, CERN developers and designers have created a version of the original WorldWideWeb browser that can run inside a modern browser. What, you wonder, is it like to surf the original web? Well, give it a try here. It’s kind of a pain!

Honestly, surfing the web with yesteryear’s technology sorta sucks compared to using the fancy browser you probably have open right now. The software that powers this great communication tool is constantly evolving and improving, making it easy to forget that the earliest versions of online were dull grey boxes of text. The original proposal for the World Wide Web, published by CERN scientist Tim Berners-Lee in March 1989, would lay the groundwork for a rudimentary “web” of hypertext documents that could be viewed through a “browser.” The very first browser application, “WorldWideWeb,” was developed on a NeXT machine and launched in December 1990, a few months before the project went public. This is the browser you can test out for yourself, again, right here.

 

 

QSR Ordering Kiosks And Out-Of-Stock Shoes

From Pymnts.com article

QSR Ordering Kiosks Evolved From A 1980s Solution For Out-Of-Stock Shoes

QSR KioskAs a college student in the 1970s, Murray Lappe heard that his fellow students wanted to promote their organizations through a new medium. During a retreat, the students thought of having a traditional bulletin board, but Lappe had an alternate take: Why not digitize the concept?

“We kicked the idea around, and it got some interest,” Lappe told kioskindustry.org. “After the session, the Dean suggested I apply for a grant to see if we could make it happen.”

With just $2,500 in seed money for the project, Lappe went to work on an interface and an algorithm to power what would arguably become one of the first self-service kiosks. The device would come to have a plasma touchscreen, which was important since many people didn’t know how to use a computer at the time.

“I wanted to make it as simple as possible for people who had never used a computer before,” Lappe added. “I didn’t want it to look or feel like a computer.”

The kiosk, which was dubbed the PLATO Hotline, appeared in the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign’s student center only a few weeks before Lappe graduated. And it was a resounding success.

Kiosk Meets Retail

A few years after the introduction of Lappe’s kiosk, the Florsheim Shoe Company decided to bring self-service kiosks into its retail stores. Through the kiosks, customers could also view different styles on a video screen, while the machine would literally talk to customers and sell them on the features of different shoes.

Read the full story at Pymnts.com article

Kiosk Manufacturer Self Service