Category Archives: Interactive kiosk

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. Member

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. is one of our charter members of the Kiosk Industry Group. A short profile follows.

Frank Mayer and Interactive KiosksKiosk Frank Mayer

Interactive kiosks are the gateway to connecting with consumers at retail.  Kiosk experience includes online sales, product demonstrations, consumer behavior tracking, mobile applications, employment and much more.

Founded in 1931, Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. is a third generation, family-owned company based in Grafton, WI. Throughout the years, we have embraced transforming design concepts and ideas into a reality within the in-store merchandising industry.

Today, Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. is a leader in in-store merchandising and is recognized in the point-of-purchase industry for the company’s ability to meet and exceed clients’ expectations.


“In an ever changing marketplace, we are the constant that provides you with a creative, responsive and thorough approach to every in-store merchandising or interactive kiosk program. Our mission is to create an environment which focuses on turning targeted in-store merchandising initiatives into guaranteed results.”

– Michael Mayer, President


Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc
1975 Wisconsin Ave.
Grafton, WI 53024
P: 855-294-2875
F: 262-377-3449
info@frankmayer.com

Contact Frank Mayer

People – Ron Bowers Retires From Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. After 35 Years

Ron Bowers Retires From Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. After 35 Years

Senior Vice President of Retail Technology Business Development Ron Bowers will retire from Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. on July 31, 2018.

Ron Bowers Frank Mayer KiosksGRAFTON, WI – After 35 years as a member of Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.’s staff, Senior Vice President of Retail Technology Business Development Ron Bowers will retire at the end of July 2018.

Bowers began with Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. in December of 1983 as a sales coordinator and quickly moved into an account executive position the following August. His passion for retail, technology solutions and point of purchase displays helped him develop relationships with well-known companies like Allstate Insurance, Irving Oil, Eagle Foods, Kroger, Miller Brewing, KEO, MacGregor Golf, Arnold Palmer Golf, Nancy Lopez Golf, Nicklaus Golf and John Deere.

Bowers’ projects often earned gold Outstanding Merchandising Awards in the display industry, including a Display of the Year award from the POPAI organization in 1992 for his work with the John Deere shop-in-shop program.

In 2005, Bowers was promoted to Senior Vice President of Retail Technology Business Development and used his vast experience and superb relationship-building skills to generate new project opportunities for Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. His expertise concerning the point of purchase business has made him a well-known thought leader in the industry, and he’s been invited to serve on countless speaking panels and interviewed for numerous trade publications over the years.

“Ron’s professionalism, drive, loyalty, passion for sales and the  relationships built with clients and associates were the foundations for his success,” says Mike Mayer, President of Frank Mayer and Associates., Inc. “His infectious positive attitude should be an example for all of us to follow, and he’ll be missed by clients and associates alike.”

Bowers’ retirement plans consist of spending more time with his wife, children, and grandchildren as well as pursuing his hobbies of golf, reading and retail technology writing.

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. is a leader in the development of in-store merchandising displays, interactive kiosks, and store fixtures for brands and retailers nationwide. The company helps retailers and brands utilize the latest display solutions and technologies to create engaging customer experiences. Visit www.frankmayer.com for more information.

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CONTACT:
Cheryl Lesniak, Integrated Marketing Manager
Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.
1975 Wisconsin Ave., Grafton, WI 53024
(262) 834-1489 | cheryl.lesniak@frankmayer.com

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What is a Kiosk – Kiosk Definition aka Define Kiosk

The Definitive Kiosk Definition or How do we most often Define Kiosk

The kiosk originally began as the town square notice board for the community to post notices.  The usual reference in Wikipedia will call out Persia as the originating language for the word. What began as common ground notice posting location matured into RMUs (Remote Merchandising Units) that you see in malls or wherever.  With advent of common internet they took on their electronic iteration in the late 90s.

For the masses it started with airline check-in terminals and photo kiosks (from Kodak and Fujifilm) and also ATMs.

For sure:

    • They allow interaction usually with touchscreen
    • Usually customers/prospects oriented

      kiosk definition the Bfit
      Click for full size image
    • Many are employee oriented
    • Generally a touchscreen.
    • Either informational or transactional in nature.

Follow Craig’s board Design Kiosk on Pinterest.

Kiosks today are very much different than those. They are self service kiosks, usually electronic, and can be found in all walks of life.  The form factor ranges from a mobile device to a tablet to a larger enclosures (usually metal but also plastic and wood).

Here are some the main categories for the modern day kiosk.

    • In malls, events, tradeshows and other locations you have the RMU, which is a Remote Merchandising Unit.  Point of Purchase fixture iterations. Many current self service kiosk companies evolved from these units design and manufacture and continue to do a large business in these. Examples would be Frank Mayer Associates & Inc., Olea Kiosk and Ikoniq (main business being RMUs).
    • It is generally interactive but not always.
    • It most often provides a computer (such as Dell Optiplex) and has a 17 or 19″ 5:4 aspect touchscreen (between 7 and 84 inches).
    • Most often it is unattended.
    • It is a standalone enclosure in most common iteration.
    • Examples follow
    • Airline Check-In Kiosks – pioneered by Kinetics and others. Major vendors include NCR, SITA, and dwindling IBM. They have also moved into the baggage area.
    • ATM Machines – Historically it has been NCR, Fujitsu, Nautilus, Triton, IBM with Wincor Nixdorf and the ISOs (Independent service operators).
    • Electronic kiosks – this is the big category. It basically includes all categories which can be bill pay kiosks, kiosk software for lockdown, financial kiosks and more.
    • Internet Cafes –  sometimes a keyboard can’t be beat. These are one of the originals and helped educate the masses on using the Internet everywhere.  We used them all the time when we would visit London, England.
    • POS Terminals – includes customer facing POS terminals whether for entering loyalty number.
    • Food Order Kiosk – McDonalds kiosk is prime example. Order your own burger made to your preferences.
    • Gaming Kiosks –  the military uses these for letting the soldiers relax (and train) at the same time.
    • Parking kiosks – whether on the street or in the garage
    • Outdoor kiosks – all kinds.
    • Hoteling – this is where office workers work at same building but can sign up for any desk for the day.  Larger companies experiment with this and in this age of BYOD it is relevant.
    • Information Kiosks terminals – can be as simple as barcode lookup in grocery aisle or online “showrooming”.  AKA Interactive kiosk.
    • Interactive Digital Signage – a contradiction in terms but Digital Signage often is a large touchscreen and offers Content Management Services as well as Advertising. The touchscreen provides major ROI component.
    • Immigration and Security Kiosks – found at airports as well as Border Control.  These units typically utilize biometrics.
    • Registration kiosks for loyalty and membership.
    • Gift card kiosks such Coinstar Gift Card Exchange.
    • Retail kiosk – this can be many iterations. The latest ones are beginning to introduce Beacons and Facial Recognition for recording demographics and traffic patterns and customer flow.
    • Gift Registry kiosk – one of the originals and still going.  Our teeth were cut developing the Bridal Registry and Baby Registry kiosks for Target. Multi-generational marketing at its best (kids shop where Mom shopped)
    • Tablet kiosk – typically used for registration and quick lookup they have the advantage of being small and can be place at eye level.
    • Vending – these can add nutritional information mandated by the government. They can dispense sandwiches, coffee and a large range of merchandise (Zoom is a pioneer).
    • Pharmacy kiosk – medicine prescription dispensing kiosks are becoming more popular.
    • Lockers – picking up your merchandise from Amazon or Fedx or UPS.
    • Charging kiosks –  need to charge your mobile phone?  There are kiosks for doing that.
    • Coin KIosks – the most famous is Coinstar.
    • Music, Movie and Media download kiosks – get your DVD on USB now
    • DVD kiosks –  still going with Redbox and others.  Locations and demographics are important.
    • Hospitality – hotel check-in kiosks
    • Healthcare – patient check-in kiosks
    • Telemedicine and Telehealth –  whether at the supermarket or at corporate headquarters, remote healthcare structures are hybrid of RMUs.  These extend into home monitoring and follow up for post operative patients to maximize results (and government incentive rewards).
    • Marijuana & Cannabis – one of the emerging markets with its high use of cash, security and new multiple form factors such as edibles.
    • Photo Kiosk – still going strong and one of the original heavy hitters. Kodak at one point had over 60,000 in place.
    • Prison kiosk – video visitation and more
    • Social kiosks – interacting with your friends at wanna-be-seen locales becomes fodder for Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. The payback is demographics.
    • Kiosk Software – lockdown software or Windows Kiosk Mode software is very popular. PROVISIO and KioWare are prime providers but versions for thin clients, Chrome Kiosk, and more are available.
    • Survey Kiosks – can be as simple as a 4 button “How Was Your Experience?” device (we like those) or a tablet.  Surveys are better being short to improve response rate.
    • Wayfinding kiosk – despite GPS enabled mobiles navigating a large structure can require clear instructions whether consumer or corporate.
    • Wine Kiosks – As a recommendation and selector function these do quite well. Experiments in dispensing wine were plagued by being poorly regulated and operated.

So what might be the definition?  Here is one: 

A computer terminal used by public or employees for services.

We’ll continue to add details and more information in the future.

 

 

Feature – A Kiosk Helps Pave the Path to Scouting’s Highest Honor

tablet kiosk project
Click to zoom

An interactive tablet kiosk from the Kiosk Group serves as the centerpiece of a young man’s Eagle Scout Service Project.

By Richard Slawsky contributor

Alex Harrison, a 16-year-old in his junior year at Fairfax High School in Fairfax, Va., has been involved with the Boy Scouts since he was in the first grade. He’s worked his way through the ranks over the past 10 years and is nearing the realization of a dream held by nearly everyone involved in Scouting, becoming an Eagle Scout.

Although the process is a long one, the final stop on the path towards becoming an Eagle Scout is the completion of the Eagle Scout Service Project, an opportunity for a Scout to demonstrate leadership of others while doing something that benefits the community. Under Scouting rules, the project can’t be of a commercial nature or be solely a fundraising effort. In addition, it needs to be something that extends beyond the Scouting organization.

kiosk tablet projectThe project Harrison chose would benefit and enhance “Historic Blenheim,” a brick house in the Fairfax area dating back to 1859 that played a prominent role in the area during the Civil War. His idea was to create a 360-degree visual tour of areas of the parts of the house that are inaccessible to visitors and place it, along with still photos and other information, on a tablet kiosk in the Civil War Interpretive Center located adjacent to the house, allowing visitors to the site to experience its entire history.

To help complete his project and clear the path towards becoming an Eagle Scout, Harrison enlisted the assistance of the kiosk industry.

Reliving history

At the time the Civil War broke out in 1861, Historic Blenheim was owned by Albert and Mary Willcoxon. Albert voted for Virginia’s secession from the Union and provided goods from his property to the Confederate Army. The area was known as Fairfax Court House and was held by the Confederates until early March 1862. At this time it came under Union control for the remainder of the war. The Willcoxon farm was occupied by Union soldiers for camping and drilling; it was also used as part of a large field hospital system for sick soldiers.

Soldiers living in the house at the time spent some of their free time drawing games, notes and signatures on its walls using charcoal, graphite and artist’s crayon. Scholars have identified the signatures of 122 Union soldiers from three different time periods in 1862 and 1863. The “diary on walls” provides insight into the life of a Civil War soldier life along with the effect of the war on local residents—such as the Willcoxon family—and free and enslaved people of African descent.

Historic Blenheim was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. Also on the 12-acre site is the Civil War Interpretive Center, opened in 2008. The Center further interprets the site’s history and the Civil War in the greater Fairfax area and includes an illustrated timeline of Civil War events, artifacts that interpret the everyday soldier, biographies of several of the wall signers and temporary displays.

The house is part of the “Northern Virginia Civil War Graffiti Trail,” six sites in Northern Virginia that offer a unique insight into the lives of Civil War soldiers.

Much of the graffiti left on the first-floor walls of Historic Blenheim was covered over by paint and wallpaper over the years, with that covering later removed to reveal the writings underneath. Despite restoration efforts, those inscriptions aren’t very clear and can be difficult to read.

“However, the best graffiti is in the attic and was never covered over,” said Andrea Loewenwarter, historic resource specialist with the Office of Historic Resources in the City of Fairfax.

“The stairwell construction does not allow for tours, so we created a ‘replica attic’ in the shape of the actual attic in our gallery in the Civil War Interpretive Center, with life-size photographs of the names on the walls,” Loewenwarter said. “Unfortunately, it does not include a third room, due to lack of space.”

Kiosk Group comes through

The rank of Eagle Scout is the pinnacle of the Boy Scout hierarchy, and is achieved by only about 4 percent of Scouts. Becoming an Eagle Scout will put Harrison in the company of people such as Neal Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon; Gerald Ford, the 38th president of the United States; and filmmaker Steven Spielberg.

Attaining that rank isn’t an easy process. There are strict requirements for becoming an Eagle Scout, including displaying leadership qualities, displaying the Scout Spirit and earning at least 21 merit badges. Harrison’s project represents the culmination of his Scouting experience.

There was just one missing piece to Harrison’s plan: the kiosk itself.

To raise money for the purchase of a tablet kiosk, Alex held fundraisers including a bake sale with his Boy Scout troop, raising about $580. In addition, the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution donated an additional $200. At that point, he began shopping around for the centerpiece of the project.

“We began looking for kiosks and our beneficiary Andrea (Loewenwarter) did some research and came across Kiosk Group,” Harrison said.

Kiosk Group, based in Frederick, Md., is a privately held company with more than 30 years’ experience in providing interactive kiosks for companies, organizations and government agencies.

“In order to get a kiosk that would fit our budget, we contacted (Kiosk Group CEO) Mike James, who gave us a pretty good price break,” Harrison said.

James provided Kiosk Group’s Standalone Kiosk for a Samsung Tab Pro S 12” tablet. The company also donated a large graphics panel to go with the kiosk and covered the shipping costs to get the components to Fairfax. Kiosk Group also had its in-house artist develop the graphic for the panel.

“This is such a unique way to provide access to parts of a historic building that aren’t otherwise open to visitors,” James said. “When we heard about Alex’s fundraising efforts, we wanted to help make his project a success.”

To round out the project, the IT staff at Fairfax’ Office of Historic Resources provided the tablet that would deliver the content for the project. In addition to providing image access to the portion of the attic that has not been replicated in the Civil War Interpretive Center, the kiosk has also served as a vehicle for long-term planning. Once it is up and running administrators plan to gradually add new material, including a PowerPoint where individual soldier’s signatures and other graffiti will be shown with descriptive information.

“We are so thrilled and grateful for the work that Alex has done to make this become a reality,” Loewenwarter said.

“I have been talking for a while about a virtual tour of the other part of the attic that is not represented in our gallery space,” she said. “This is so much more than we imagined.”

For Harrison, the project will serve as valuable experience and lay the groundwork for his goals of graduating high school and going on to college, possibly pursuing a degree in film production, design or animation.

First, though, he has another goal to complete.

“I just have to turn in my application and hopefully I will be an Eagle Scout by the end of the school year,” he said.


For more information and for assistance with your next Tablet project contact Mike James with Kiosk Group [mjames@kioskgroup.com]

 

Interactive Kiosk – Dave & Busters “ticket-less” kiosk for Gaming

interactive kiosk
Click to see full size image.. Cool!

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. has a new interactive kiosk program within the family entertainment gaming industry.

Dave & Buster’s is building on their ability to offer “ticket-less” rewards points directly to the gamer’s card by re-designing their loyalty kiosks. Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. designed and produced both the Loyalty Reward Kiosk and POWER CARD® Kiosk for use in Dave & Buster’s locations nationwide.

The press release is linked below, titled “Dave & Buster’s powers up their family entertainment loyalty program with re-designed interactive kiosks”.  Click on the image to get a better view. Cool kiosk design!

The Dave & Buster’s Loyalty Rewards Gaming Kiosks program page can be found: http://www.frankmayer.com/interactive-kiosk-solutions/dave-busters-loyalty-rewards-kiosks/.  The press release can also be found: http://www.frankmayer.com/about-fma/frank-mayer-news/

Download now the FMA_Dave&Busters press release

The Dave & Buster’s multi-kiosk program is responsive to customers’ changing needs, along with Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.’s ability to design successful interactive kiosk programs thoroughly and efficiently.

Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. is an industry leader in the creative design and manufacturing of branded in-store merchandising displays, interactive kiosks and store fixtures for leading consumer product companies and retailers. Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.’s headquarters are based in Grafton, Wisconsin with offices nationwide.

Contact:

Cheryl Lesniak
Digital Media Marketing Manager
Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.
P: 262-377-4700
Cheryl.lesniak@frankmayer.com
www.frankmayer.com

Interactive Kiosks for card games by Frank Mayer

Interactive Kiosks for Card Games by Frank Mayer

Source: Frank Mayer

April 5, 2016 – Embed displays interactive solutions for family gaming fun.

frankmayer embed kioskEmbed, part of the multinational entertainment group Helix Leisure, partners with Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. to produce interactive game card kiosks for the gaming and family entertainment market.

Embed is a worldwide provider of solutions for the gaming, entertainment, amusement and leisure industries. Their interactive game card kiosk provides customers with a quick and easy way to purchase or recharge a game card used to activate amusement games. It also allows reward card personalization, balance check and loyalty information for every active card.

The self-service kiosk is the cornerstone of an efficient ticketless game and amusement business model which provides operators up-to-the-minute revenue information.

– See more at: http://www.frankmayer.com/about-fma/frank-mayer-news/#sthash.8EKCqk2y.dpuf

NRF 2016 Retail Kiosk Gallery

NRF 2016 Retail Kiosk Gallery

Pictures of units that we took as we toured NRF in NY for 2016. The coolest demo was Diebold actually.


Interactive kiosks at Syracuse

Interactive kiosks at Syracuse

It’s hard to miss the high tech, interactive Syracuse visitors’ guides that have popped up around Syracuse jammed full of information and it’s not just for people outside the area.

Source: www.localsyr.com

Syracuse (WSYR-TV) – It’s hard to miss the high tech, interactive Syracuse visitors’ guides that have popped up around Syracuse jammed full of information and it’s not just for people outside the area.

The first 11 are funded by the Connective Corridor and Syracuse University.

Tap your way through the touch screen kiosk and you’re connected to places and events all over Central New York.

David Holder, President of Visit Syracuse, tells NewsChannel 9, “The visitors will get used to seeing this platform so they’ll go into another location go, ‘I’ve seen this before – it’s really easy to use let me pull up the next place I want to go on the screen.’ They can also start planning the current trip then but the future trips as well.”

They are strategically placed around the area like the Convention Center, The MOST and Landmark Theater but they’re also moveable for special events.

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