Tag Archives: tablet

So Which is Better for Visitor Registration? The iPad or the Android…

Originally published by Greetly at https://www.greetly.com/blog/android-ipad-receptionist“.

iPad or Android — Which Should You Use for Your Visitor Registration App?

Posted by Greetly on October 30, 2018

Thinking about implementing a visitor registration app in your office? Prepare to be amazed by the efficiency. An Android or iPad receptionist does the work of several people, all for a fraction of the cost.

  • Receiving your guests in style
  • Real-time reception notifications via phone call, text message, email or Slack
  • Taking photos and printing visitor badges
  • Accepting packages
  • Event check-ins
  • Capturing NDA and waiver eSignatures
  • Creating a cloud-based visitor logbook

These are just a sampling of the features of the best visitor check-in apps. Keeping you on task while prioritizing your visitor’s time, a visitor registration app is the jack of all trades.

You might think something so sophisticated would be a headache to implement, but a visitor registration app can be set up for free, in just minutes, regardless of your tech skills. All that’s required is a tablet computer and a mount to secure it and make it highly visible when your guests arrive. Your visitor management system can be mounted on a desktop stand, floor stand kiosk, or even on the wall.

The question we are often asked is… Which tablet will work best for our Greetly visitor sign-in app? Here are some advantages of running your visitor registration app on Apple’s iPad devices versus Google’s Android operating system.

Digital Receptionist Feature Checklist

Advantages of an iPad Receptionist

  • Tech Leader: Apple continues to push the envelope with the iPad line; they are constantly releasing new technologies and advanced capabilities. It is one of the fastest tablets on the market, and even exceeds many laptops in performance ability. iPad offers high touch technology in a package that’s easy for the average person to use. Because of this, Apple is a tablet computing market leader, with over 350 million iPad tablets sold since 2010.
  • Highly Standardized: Those hundreds of millions of tablets sold are across a very small number of SKUs, shapes and device sizes. And they all run the same operating system, Apple’s iOS, which is built on the premise of a simple user interface. And buttons are in the same place from model to model. These make iPads familiar and easy to operate, even for those who generally do not use Apple products. As iOS is a closed operating system and with a closely controlled iTunes app store, there is less risk of viruses, malware, spyware or corruption on anything that you download.
  • More Check-In App Hardware Options: Thanks to the standardization, there are countless floor stand, desktop and wall mount hardware options to support your sign-in kiosk. You will surely find something perfect for your lobby environment. And they are generally lower priced to their Android counterparts. When you add the pieces and parts, an iPad-based hardware package may be cost competitive to an Android alternative. This is also important if you require multiple check-in kiosks due to a busy reception area or multiple visitor entry points or floors.
  • Resale Value: Apple’s appeal is only growing, making the iPad a strong investment. With options for resale, trade-in, or upgrade, they make it easy to scale your visitor management system. The Apple support team, both online and in-store, is a commodity that also adds value to your business, in that they keep your iPad, and thereby your visitor registration app, running smoothly.

 

Lady using an Android tablet visitor registration app

Advantages of an Android Reception Tablet

  • Supports Multiple Stores: While the iPad plays nicely with Apple devices, Androids play nicely with others too. The Android supports multiple app stores, such as GoogleAmazon, and Samsung, giving you more options for downloading and running your apps. Android is also more customizable, allowing you to get more creative and personalized to fit your organization and brand.
  • More App Availability and Connectivity: With Android’s more open operating system comes a wider array of options. Android screens are available in excess of 20″, for a highly visible visitor management app kiosk. Your visitor registration app will be prominently displayed, and legible to all your viewers. Unlike iPadAndroid is a general name for a multitude of devices, with different specs, sizes and colors from a variety of different manufacturers. This gives you more affordable options for running your visitor registration app.
  • Bigger Bang for the Buck: More hardware manufacturers building for Google’s Android platform means more competition. And that means a lower purchase price for most Android tablets. Although, as noted above, you also need a mount to secure your device. Make sure to compare the total cost of ownership.
  • Market Leader: While Apple gets a lot of the hype, Android currently holds more of the market share. More smartphones users own Android devices than iPhones, and PC Magazine recently ranked Amazon Fire tablets above the iPad for 2018, a trend that is gaining traction.

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Conclusion

Ultimately, you can’t go wrong. There are unique advantages to running your visitor registration app on Apple iPad – amazing technology, standardization, lots of affordable mounting options and resale value lowering the lifetime cost of ownership. Google’s Android operating system offers it’s own advantages – a lower upfront price point and more tablet devices to choose from.

Both tablet hardware options will successfully run the best visitor registration apps like Greetly. And given the amazing computing power of these devices, and the massive feature set of modern visitor sign-in apps, in comparison to the low cost, you will surely save money and increase productivity.

Originally published by Greetly at https://www.greetly.com/blog/android-ipad-receptionist“.

 

Feature – A Kiosk Helps Pave the Path to Scouting’s Highest Honor

tablet kiosk project
Click to zoom

An interactive tablet kiosk from the Kiosk Group serves as the centerpiece of a young man’s Eagle Scout Service Project.

By Richard Slawsky contributor

Alex Harrison, a 16-year-old in his junior year at Fairfax High School in Fairfax, Va., has been involved with the Boy Scouts since he was in the first grade. He’s worked his way through the ranks over the past 10 years and is nearing the realization of a dream held by nearly everyone involved in Scouting, becoming an Eagle Scout.

Although the process is a long one, the final stop on the path towards becoming an Eagle Scout is the completion of the Eagle Scout Service Project, an opportunity for a Scout to demonstrate leadership of others while doing something that benefits the community. Under Scouting rules, the project can’t be of a commercial nature or be solely a fundraising effort. In addition, it needs to be something that extends beyond the Scouting organization.

kiosk tablet projectThe project Harrison chose would benefit and enhance “Historic Blenheim,” a brick house in the Fairfax area dating back to 1859 that played a prominent role in the area during the Civil War. His idea was to create a 360-degree visual tour of areas of the parts of the house that are inaccessible to visitors and place it, along with still photos and other information, on a tablet kiosk in the Civil War Interpretive Center located adjacent to the house, allowing visitors to the site to experience its entire history.

To help complete his project and clear the path towards becoming an Eagle Scout, Harrison enlisted the assistance of the kiosk industry.

Reliving history

At the time the Civil War broke out in 1861, Historic Blenheim was owned by Albert and Mary Willcoxon. Albert voted for Virginia’s secession from the Union and provided goods from his property to the Confederate Army. The area was known as Fairfax Court House and was held by the Confederates until early March 1862. At this time it came under Union control for the remainder of the war. The Willcoxon farm was occupied by Union soldiers for camping and drilling; it was also used as part of a large field hospital system for sick soldiers.

Soldiers living in the house at the time spent some of their free time drawing games, notes and signatures on its walls using charcoal, graphite and artist’s crayon. Scholars have identified the signatures of 122 Union soldiers from three different time periods in 1862 and 1863. The “diary on walls” provides insight into the life of a Civil War soldier life along with the effect of the war on local residents—such as the Willcoxon family—and free and enslaved people of African descent.

Historic Blenheim was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. Also on the 12-acre site is the Civil War Interpretive Center, opened in 2008. The Center further interprets the site’s history and the Civil War in the greater Fairfax area and includes an illustrated timeline of Civil War events, artifacts that interpret the everyday soldier, biographies of several of the wall signers and temporary displays.

The house is part of the “Northern Virginia Civil War Graffiti Trail,” six sites in Northern Virginia that offer a unique insight into the lives of Civil War soldiers.

Much of the graffiti left on the first-floor walls of Historic Blenheim was covered over by paint and wallpaper over the years, with that covering later removed to reveal the writings underneath. Despite restoration efforts, those inscriptions aren’t very clear and can be difficult to read.

“However, the best graffiti is in the attic and was never covered over,” said Andrea Loewenwarter, historic resource specialist with the Office of Historic Resources in the City of Fairfax.

“The stairwell construction does not allow for tours, so we created a ‘replica attic’ in the shape of the actual attic in our gallery in the Civil War Interpretive Center, with life-size photographs of the names on the walls,” Loewenwarter said. “Unfortunately, it does not include a third room, due to lack of space.”

Kiosk Group comes through

The rank of Eagle Scout is the pinnacle of the Boy Scout hierarchy, and is achieved by only about 4 percent of Scouts. Becoming an Eagle Scout will put Harrison in the company of people such as Neal Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon; Gerald Ford, the 38th president of the United States; and filmmaker Steven Spielberg.

Attaining that rank isn’t an easy process. There are strict requirements for becoming an Eagle Scout, including displaying leadership qualities, displaying the Scout Spirit and earning at least 21 merit badges. Harrison’s project represents the culmination of his Scouting experience.

There was just one missing piece to Harrison’s plan: the kiosk itself.

To raise money for the purchase of a tablet kiosk, Alex held fundraisers including a bake sale with his Boy Scout troop, raising about $580. In addition, the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution donated an additional $200. At that point, he began shopping around for the centerpiece of the project.

“We began looking for kiosks and our beneficiary Andrea (Loewenwarter) did some research and came across Kiosk Group,” Harrison said.

Kiosk Group, based in Frederick, Md., is a privately held company with more than 30 years’ experience in providing interactive kiosks for companies, organizations and government agencies.

“In order to get a kiosk that would fit our budget, we contacted (Kiosk Group CEO) Mike James, who gave us a pretty good price break,” Harrison said.

James provided Kiosk Group’s Standalone Kiosk for a Samsung Tab Pro S 12” tablet. The company also donated a large graphics panel to go with the kiosk and covered the shipping costs to get the components to Fairfax. Kiosk Group also had its in-house artist develop the graphic for the panel.

“This is such a unique way to provide access to parts of a historic building that aren’t otherwise open to visitors,” James said. “When we heard about Alex’s fundraising efforts, we wanted to help make his project a success.”

To round out the project, the IT staff at Fairfax’ Office of Historic Resources provided the tablet that would deliver the content for the project. In addition to providing image access to the portion of the attic that has not been replicated in the Civil War Interpretive Center, the kiosk has also served as a vehicle for long-term planning. Once it is up and running administrators plan to gradually add new material, including a PowerPoint where individual soldier’s signatures and other graffiti will be shown with descriptive information.

“We are so thrilled and grateful for the work that Alex has done to make this become a reality,” Loewenwarter said.

“I have been talking for a while about a virtual tour of the other part of the attic that is not represented in our gallery space,” she said. “This is so much more than we imagined.”

For Harrison, the project will serve as valuable experience and lay the groundwork for his goals of graduating high school and going on to college, possibly pursuing a degree in film production, design or animation.

First, though, he has another goal to complete.

“I just have to turn in my application and hopefully I will be an Eagle Scout by the end of the school year,” he said.


For more information and for assistance with your next Tablet project contact Mike James with Kiosk Group [mjames@kioskgroup.com]

 

Faceoff: Kiosks vs. Tablets in HR and Healthcare

The choice between a tablet and a full-size kiosk comes down to the purpose for which it will be used.

From Olea Kiosks TheLab

Kiosks or Tablets in HR and Healthcare

Although kiosk technology is becoming commonplace in a variety of verticals, areas where it has had a particular impact include both human resources and health care.

On the human resources side, many companies are placing job application kiosks in retail stores or other highly trafficked areas, allowing them to recruit workers around the clock without having to staff a hiring booth. In addition, a kiosk in the break room or other employee area allows workers to check schedules and payroll information, request days off or make changes to their personnel file.

For health care providers, a waiting room kiosk allows patients to fill out forms or make payments on their account, taking some of the burden off the front desk staff. A kiosk in a pharmacy can perform functions ranging from blood pressure checks to telehealth consultations, while a kiosk in a hospital setting lets doctors easily check patient record, submit prescriptions for medications or schedule tests.

With the advent of tablet computers, the kiosk arena is becoming populated with units that feature a tablet at their core as well as units built from the ground up. When considering the addition of a kiosk network to supplement the HR department or modernize a health care facility, which is the better option? A full-fledged kiosk, or a tablet-based model?

Determining the need

Of course, like many things in the business world (and life in general) the answer is “it all depends.” Both have their advantages and drawbacks.

Factors to consider when choosing between a full-fledged kiosk and a tablet-based model is the function the unit is expected to perform, the space available and the number of people expected to use the device. One of the biggest factors to consider is the deployer’s budget.

tablet kiosk enclosure
tablet kiosk enclosure

“Tablets can be portable, very small, and placed nearly anywhere,” said Frank Olea, CEO of Olea Kiosks.

“The cost is low so placing multiple units becomes very easy,” Olea said. “Tablets can have one device hardwire-powered, and their built-in cameras can be coaxed into performing functions such as reading ID cards or barcodes.”

Verona kiosk
Click for full size

Olea Kiosks offers a complete line of tablet and full-size kiosks. Its tablet line can be mounted on a tabletop, a wall or on a freestanding mount, and units come with a card reader. On the full-size kiosk side, Olea offers several models specifically designed for the HR and health care spaces; its Verona model is the only pushbutton height-adjustable kiosk on the market. The units can be raised or lowered by 10 inches at the push of a button, making them easily accessible by a person of any height or ability.

The relative simplicity of a tablet can keep maintenance costs to a minimum. The ability to detach a tablet from its mount opens up additional opportunities, allowing a job applicant to take the device to their seat to fill out forms or giving doctors the ability to sit with patients and map out treatment plans.

On the down side, though, the ability to detach a tablet from its mount does create a greater risk of damage or theft. Some tablet management software systems leverage the unit’s GPS functionality to send an alert text or email if the device is taken outside a predefined area.

Full size kiosks, on the other hand, will cost more than a tablet kiosk but can do everything a tablet-based kiosk can do and more. Additional processing power can make it easier to implement advanced features such as telehealth services or one-on-one conferencing with the corporate HR department.

Although kiosks are certainly larger and take up a bit more space, the footprint of a freestanding tablet kiosk is only slightly smaller than a traditional kiosk, making space considerations a relatively minor concern.

“If you want to create more of a presence for your check-in area, a few full-sized kiosks lined up is often all that is required,” Olea said. “Also, a full-size kiosk can come equipped with more devices if needed like card scanners, barcode readers, printers and keyboards.”

Protecting privacy

One area of concern that can influence the choice of kiosk is compliance with privacy regulations in handling personal information. This can be particularly relevant in a health care facility, where running afoul of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) can result in fines running into the hundreds or thousands of dollars.

An advantage that a kiosk has over a tablet is that things like privacy filters can be embedded between the touch glass and the LCD screen, Olea said.

“On a tablet, anything you do would have to be on the screen surface itself and is very easily damaged and picked off,” he said. “Also, kiosks can feature printers with a retract function so if a patient does not take their print out the printer and retract the print and deposit it inside of the kiosk for safe disposal later.”

Still, there are privacy screens that can be incorporated into tablet kiosks to help protect user privacy.

Whichever route a deployer chooses, of critical importance will be compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. It’s in that area that full-size kiosks may have an edge. Full size kiosks can include headphone jacks with volume control and easily connect with external devices such as Braille keyboards or the Nav-Pad, a device that allows someone with impaired vision, restricted mobility or limited fine motor skills to use the kiosk through a series of highly tactile buttons and audio prompts.

The larger and brighter screens of a traditional kiosk also aid in the ADA compliance for self-service devices.

“ADA is becoming a major concern here in California and we suspect will become much more of an issue in other states as kiosks become more commonplace in the healthcare and HR fields,” Olea said.

“No longer can you get away with a kiosk just being ‘reachable’,” he said. “Most companies will say their product is ADA compliant, but they fail to mention they’ve only covered a very small spectrum of individuals with disabilities. Sure, someone in a wheelchair can reach the screen, but serving people with disabilities goes far beyond that.”

At the end of the day, the best way to provide a self-service solution that is accessible by all types of users, is compliant with privacy rules and helps improve operations for the deployer is to work with an experienced kiosk vendor who is well-versed in the ever-changing regulatory environment. Olea Kiosks stands ready to help.

Kiosk Software – New KioWare for Android Update 3.7

Kiosk SoftwareKiosk Software KioWare for Android

Version 3.7 of KioWare for Android is now available. The latest release of KioWare for Android continues to support EMV certified mobile payments via Credit Call’s newest release of the mPOS CardEaseMobile framework (1.11).  KioWare for Android now also supports devices providing detection of user presence.

Analytical Design Solutions Inc. (ADSI) has released a new version of their KioWare for Android software products.

All KioWare products can be used to secure mobile devices such as tablets, desktops, and smartphones running Android or Windows Operating Systems. KioWare kiosk software products lock down your device into kiosk mode, which secures the overall operating system, home screen and usage of applications.

Version 3.7 of KioWare for Android (Lite, Basic, & Full with Server) has added a new simple attract screen looper to allow customers to easily add attract screens via the configuration tool. The attract screen is also now available in Single App Mode. The configuration tool now also enables user to set the battery indicator display to on or off.

The latest version of KioWare Basic for Android and KioWare Full for Android has also updated support for EMV certified via Credit Call’s mPOS CardEaseMobile framework to version 1.11. Using Miura PINPads and KioWare for Android, a complete end-to-end, EMV compliant and P2PE enabled payment solution is available. For a full device list, visit our website.

Users of KioWare for Android should update their version of KioWare to version 3.7. Current support is required in order to update.

All of these products are available as a free trial with nag screen. Existing clients have the ability to upgrade.

KioWare has been providing OS, desktop, and browser lockdown security for the kiosk and self-service industry since 2001. You can easily download the fully functioning free trial directly from Google Play.